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Endeavour

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OPINION
October 16, 2012
Re "Shuttle crawls obstacle course," Oct. 14 Thank you for your coverage of the space shuttle Endeavour's final journey. The photos were inspiring, and you can see that the shuttle is a bit scarred from its travels but handsome just the same. She deserves the attention after her service to our country. Thanks to Los Angeles for providing a home for this veteran. Christine Chamness Appleton, Wis. I was among the thousands who attended the Endeavour ceremony at the Forum in Inglewood, and was at the corner of Crenshaw and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards to witness this historic mission.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Angel Jennings
In the name of civic progress, the Crenshaw corridor has lost a lot of trees. First, to clear the way for the space shuttle Endeavour's trek to the California Science Center, 71 mature magnolias and pines were chopped down in 2012 along an almost two-mile stretch in South Los Angeles. Now, with the construction of the Crenshaw/LAX subway line, residents are bracing for more. About 175 trees - a third of those remaining - are expected to be cut down along Crenshaw Boulevard during the light-rail project, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
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NATIONAL
July 16, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2013 | By Kate Mather
The space shuttle Endeavour arrived at the California Science Center nearly one year ago, and the Exposition Park museum is throwing its crown jewel quite the anniversary party. Saturday marks the second day of "Endeavour Fest," a three-day event featuring astronaut presentations, film screenings and other displays related to science and engineering. The museum will also have on display the SpaceX Dragon -- the first commercial spacecraft to make a successful delivery to the International Space Station -- and the capsule and pressurized suit Felix Baumgartner used when making his recent record-breaking leap from the stratosphere.
OPINION
September 25, 2012
Re "The last dance," Sept. 22 I have been struck by the outpouring of positive emotion over Endeavour's final flight. I wish the space shuttle could have flown over every major American city, sparking patriotism for some peaceful national goal that supersedes politics. People of all political stripes are sick of all the negative energy and want to believe in what has made our country the envy of the world. We need another national goal to re-dedicate our imagination to the evolution of mankind.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Mark K. Matthews, Orlando Sentinel
President Obama plans to attend the April 29 launch of space shuttle Endeavour, adding even more star power to NASA's second-to-last shuttle launch, according to a White House official. The president will bring his wife, Michelle, and two daughters, Sasha and Malia, to the launch, now scheduled at 3:47 p.m. a week from Friday Sources close to the discussion said several factors played into his decision to attend. For one, Obama already plans to be in Florida that day for a commencement address at Miami Dade College . Secondly, the Endeavour launch carries major significance -- beyond the emotion expected to accompany the sunset of the 30-year shuttle program.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
Spare parts were collecting dust in warehouses in Bell, Downey and Palmdale when the urgent call came from NASA: the nation needed another space shuttle. It was the unusual beginning of the orbiter Endeavour, which will streak across the California coastline at hypersonic velocity one last time Wednesday, carrying its six astronauts and two decades of the nation's human space flight history. When it was christened in Palmdale in 1991, it was the newest and most capable of the fleet, fawned over by astronauts for its advanced flight electronics, sinuous skins and, eventually, the first toilet that actually worked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2012 | By Deirdre Edgar
Staff in The Times' downtown Los Angeles office had a prime viewing spot as the space shuttle Endeavour flew over Southern California for the last time. Other staff were around the region to report on the shuttle's final journey . Some of their comments from the historic flyby ... [ View the story "Times staff plays #SpottheShuttle" on Storify ]   readers.representative@latimes.com Follow the Readers' Rep on Twitter and Google+  
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
NASA space shuttle Endeavour's departure for Los Angeles has been delayed another day, officials at Kennedy Space Center said Monday. A low-pressure front in the northern Gulf of Mexico is generating stormy weather along Endeavour's flight path, grounding the orbiter until Wednesday. Endeavour, mounted onto a specially modified 747 carrier aircraft, was originally set to be ferried to its final hom e in the California Science Center at sunrise Monday. Managers are considering their options, NASA spokesman Mike Curie said.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
Well, they were no Mercury or Apollo missions, but that's the point. The space shuttles were supposed to make the dramatic and heroic single-warrior space mission into something routine, to make it possible for humans to inhabit space with as much regularity and comfort as they might have on a camping trip, if you could go camping in zero gravity. After a victory lap over California on Friday, Endeavour comes to its new L.A. home ferried by piggyback, the way the shuttles used to be delivered from their landing places back to their home base in Florida.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
Tens of thousands of spectators crowded sidewalks and rooftops last October as the space shuttle Endeavour crawled across the streets of Los Angeles and Inglewood, an overwhelming welcome home for the retired spacecraft. Two weeks later, when the California Science Center opened the shuttle to public view, attendance at the Exposition Park museum surged. In just a few months, more than 1 million people visited the Science Center, which had averaged roughly 1.6 million visitors per year prior to the shuttle's arrival.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
The gig: Richard Plump is chief executive of Plump Engineering Inc., an Anaheim architectural engineering firm with 38 employees. Plump helped oversee the transportation of the space shuttle Endeavour from Los Angeles International Airport to the California Science Center in Exposition Park last year. He made sure the spacecraft did not damage streets or underground pipes as it wound through a 12-mile stretch of Inglewood and Los Angeles. He had previously overseen the movement of the huge rock that's now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Troubled childhood: Plump, 51, overcame a difficult childhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Having last year put a toe in the water with an exploratory pilot and found it fine, "Endeavour" returns to the PBS series "Masterpiece Mystery" Sunday with four new episodes. They are excellent company, even if they sometimes feel too coincidental, complicated, clever or corpse-strewn to be true. The series is a prequel to the beloved "Inspector Morse" (1987-2000), which starred the late John Thaw as an Oxford-based police detective. (The character's first name provides the new show's title.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
L.A. Times TV critic Robert Lloyd highlights the week's television: "Drunk History" (Comedy Central, Tuesdays) . A great and terrible idea that yields hilarity pretty consistently: Heavily intoxicated narrators (comics, comic actors) retell episodes from history as accurately as they can manage; other comic actors (and assorted ringers), costumed and bewigged, mouth the speaker's words as dialogue in what might be called ahistorical reenactments. Offering actual drunkenness rather than play-drunkenness as something to laugh at feels a little fraught, morally, and, indeed, there will be those for whom the whole enterprise (originally created by Derek Waters, who hosts, for the website Funny or Die)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
More than 1 million people have visited the California Science Center since space shuttle Endeavour made its debut just over four months ago, far surpassing officials' expectations for the Exposition Park museum. Science Center President Jeffrey Rudolph initially guessed about 2 million people would see the retired orbiter in its first year at the free museum, which averages about 1.6 million visitors per year. Now, he estimates at least 2.5 million people will pass through its turnstiles - a record.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON--The last of the retired space shuttles is headed for its final landing. Atlantis was making its 9.8-mile journey Friday from Florida's Kennedy Space Center to its permanent new home at the nearby visitors complex. "Godspeed Atlantis, on your next mission of inspiration and motivation," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. VIDEO: Timelapse journey of Endeavour "It's now NASA's honor to permanently house this magnificent spacecraft right here where she rose to the skies 33 times carrying 156 men and women," said Bolden, a former astronaut who flew on Atlantis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2012 | By Deirdre Edgar
In a post on The Times' Framework blog, staff photographer Gary Friedman weighs in on the discussion about his photo of the space shuttle Endeavour passing the Hollywood sign: "As part of a team of more than 20 Times photographers, my position was on the helipad of downtown's 73-story U.S. Bank Tower, the tallest building west of the Mississippi. "I had a 360-degree view of the city. A photographer from the Reuters news agency and a video crew from NASA were also on the building to document the event.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Space shuttle Endeavour soared into space early today in a rare nighttime launch. Endeavour's seven crew members will deliver a storage compartment for a Japanese lab to the International Space Station -- the first of three lab installments -- as well as a Canadian robot designed to help with outside maintenance. The lab -- called Kibo, or Hope -- is so big that it will require three shuttle flights to get everything up. The storage compartment is loaded aboard Endeavour; the lab itself will fly on the next mission in May. This is scheduled to be NASA's longest space station mission at 16 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2012 | Kate Mather
For more than two decades, officials at the California Science Center dreamed of showcasing a space shuttle at the Exposition Park museum. It took a nationwide competition, a three-day cross-country flight and a harrowing 12-mile trek through the streets of Los Angeles, but on Tuesday, that dream will come true. The free, state-run museum will open its doors to the display pavilion housing the retired orbiter Endeavour, which arrived at the Science Center about two weeks ago. The 18,000-square-foot building will showcase the museum's prized exhibit until a new air and space wing is built.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2012 | By Richard Simon
Granted, moving Atlantis, the last of the retired space shuttles, won't be as difficult as Endeavour's recent, and tortuous, trip through Los Angeles. That journey required the chopping down of hundreds of trees - and Endeavour arrived 16 hours behind schedule Still, moving Atlantis 9.8 miles will be no piece of cake. “You're talking about 165,000 pounds, a national treasure, a priceless artifact.... No pressure," said Tim Macy, director of project development and construction for Delaware North Cos., which operates the Kennedy Space Center visitors complex in Florida.
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