Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEndeavour Space Shuttle
IN THE NEWS

Endeavour Space Shuttle

NEWS
December 1, 1998 | Associated Press
NASA began the countdown Monday for a shuttle launch that will put the first American piece of the international space station into orbit. Endeavour is scheduled to blast off Thursday on the long-delayed mission. During the flight, two spacewalking astronauts will fasten together the U.S. piece and a component that was launched by the Russians nearly two weeks ago. It is expected to take a total of 45 U.S. and Russian launches over the next five years to haul up pieces of the space station.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 24, 1998 | From Associated Press
The gap between Mir and Endeavour narrowed orbit by orbit Friday as the shuttle chased the space station some 240 miles above Earth for one last astronaut swap. The shuttle is scheduled to rendezvous with Mir this afternoon to deliver the last American to stay aboard the space station. Astronaut Andrew Thomas couldn't wait to get to Mir, and Mir's David Wolf couldn't wait to see him. Wolf has been living on the Russian space station since late September; Thomas will stay until early June.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Bad weather threatens to delay Thursday's scheduled launch of the space shuttle Endeavour on a mission to Russia's Mir space station, Air Force meteorologists said. The shuttle and its crew of seven have only a 40% chance of making the 9:28 p.m. EST launch time, said an official at Kennedy Space Center.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Astronauts aboard the space shuttle Endeavour powered up their massive radar arrays on the first of nine days after launching from the Kennedy Space Center. They will collect images for a three-dimensional map of the Earth's surface. NASA has said the map will be 30 times better than existing maps, but most of it will remain classified for use by U.S. defense and intelligence agencies.
NEWS
February 2, 2000 | From Reuters
NASA said on Tuesday it will delay the launch of the space shuttle Endeavour until at least Feb. 9 so that a malfunctioning electronics system aboard the orbiter can be replaced. Bad weather caused the scrub of Endeavour's launch Monday on an Earth-mapping mission. Skies cleared on Tuesday, but engineers are still scratching their heads over a technical problem that cropped up during the countdown.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
The space shuttle Endeavour roared off the launch pad Friday at the start of a long-delayed mission that is aimed at producing the best-ever three-dimensional images of Earth's surface. The six astronauts on board will spend 11 days in space bouncing radar signals off cities, fields, mountains, forests and other features that shape the planet between its polar regions.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | From Reuters
Astronauts aboard the space shuttle Endeavour ended their ambitious Earth-mapping work Monday after some anxious moments closing a hatch. Bad weather forced them to consider landing at a seldom used strip in New Mexico. Following a final mapping pass over Australia, the astronauts began to stow their equipment for today's scheduled landing, but there was trouble with the 20-story radar mast deployed just hours after their Feb. 11 liftoff.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
Space shuttle Endeavour and its crew of six returned to Earth on Tuesday with more than a week's worth of radar images that will be transformed into the finest maps of the planet. Commander Kevin Kregel guided the shuttle down through a clear sky moments after sunset. Gusty winds at the runway had forced him to make an extra swing around Earth, delaying the homecoming by 1 1/2 hours.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Computer trouble and bad weather forced NASA on Monday to delay the launch of space shuttle Endeavour on a quest to create the most accurate map of Earth ever produced. Launch managers said they would try again today, but only if the computer problem can be solved quickly. Liftoff time would be 12:44 p.m. Program manager Ron Dittemore said the launch would have to be delayed a week to replace the computerized unit, called a master events controller. It is a critical component.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
After 2 1/2 days of exhaustive work, NASA came up with a plan Wednesday for space shuttle Endeavour's astronauts to tighten a slack solar wing on the international space station. Joe Tanner and Carlos Noriega will attempt the tricky repair during a spacewalk today. Mission Control warned Tanner and Noriega it may take them several tries to get two loose tension cables back on their pulleys and reels.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|