Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEndeavour Space Station
IN THE NEWS

Endeavour Space Station

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
November 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
Space shuttle Endeavour streaked into orbit Saturday night after weeks of delay, carrying a new set of residents and another massive building block for the international space station. NASA had feared storms in Spain might postpone the flight for the second day. But in the end, the rain held off at one of the two overseas emergency landing strips and managers cleared Endeavour and its crew of seven for takeoff.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 29, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Space shuttle Endeavour and its crew of seven departed the International Space Station on Friday, ending a 12-day visit that left the orbiting complex with more modern living quarters for bigger crews. Endeavour pulled away as the two spacecraft soared 220 miles above the Pacific, just east of Taiwan. "Thanks for the incredible makeover and leaving the station in fantastic shape," space station skipper Mike Fincke radioed the shuttle crew. Endeavour backed up and completed a lap around the space station, for picture-taking.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
March 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Space shuttle Endeavour pulled up to the International Space Station and docked Wednesday, kicking off almost two weeks of demanding construction work. Before the late-night linkup, Endeavour's commander, Dominic Gorie, guided the shuttle through a 360-degree back flip to allow for full photographic surveillance. It's one of the many safety-related procedures put in place after the Columbia disaster in 2003.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
Space shuttle Endeavour streaked into orbit Saturday night after weeks of delay, carrying a new set of residents and another massive building block for the international space station. NASA had feared storms in Spain might postpone the flight for the second day. But in the end, the rain held off at one of the two overseas emergency landing strips and managers cleared Endeavour and its crew of seven for takeoff.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Endeavour's astronauts overcame their first hurdle Saturday in building the international space station: hoisting the 25,000-pound Unity chamber from the shuttle cargo bay, with only an inch of clearance on either side. An even tougher job awaits them today, when they attempt to pluck a much larger Russian station component from orbit and attach it to the U.S. piece without a direct line of sight.
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
Endeavour's astronauts connected the first two building blocks of the international space station Sunday, creating a seven-story tower in the shuttle cargo bay. It was the first time that the Russian-built Zarya control module and the U.S.-made Unity chamber had ever touched. It looked to be a perfect and, hopefully, long-lasting fit. "We have capture of Zarya," commander Robert Cabana announced the moment the two pieces came together.
SCIENCE
September 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA is delaying next month's shuttle launch to the Hubble Space Telescope because of problems stemming from Hurricane Ike and replacement parts for the observatory. Space shuttle Atlantis is now set to blast off late at night on Oct. 14 for the last visit to the orbiting telescope, officials said this week. Liftoff had been scheduled for Oct. 10. Endeavour's space station mission has been delayed until Nov. 16.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA pressed ahead with the first spacewalk of shuttle Endeavour's space station mission despite a problem getting power to a giant robot that needs to be assembled by astronauts. The trouble cropped up earlier in the day and had engineers scrambling for a solution. LeRoy Cain, chairman of the mission management team at Cape Canaveral, said the nighttime spacewalk would go off as planned and stressed that the power loss would not affect astronauts' work to attach the robot's hands to its 11-foot arms.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
With astronauts at the controls, the international space station's new 58-foot robot arm took its first baby step Monday, lifting one hand and putting it down 24 feet away. "Congratulations. You've just added a new part of the station," radioed Mission Control. "We've got a lot of excited people up here," replied space station astronaut Susan Helms.
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
Endeavour's astronauts connected the first two building blocks of the international space station Sunday, creating a seven-story tower in the shuttle cargo bay. It was the first time that the Russian-built Zarya control module and the U.S.-made Unity chamber had ever touched. It looked to be a perfect and, hopefully, long-lasting fit. "We have capture of Zarya," commander Robert Cabana announced the moment the two pieces came together.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Endeavour's astronauts overcame their first hurdle Saturday in building the international space station: hoisting the 25,000-pound Unity chamber from the shuttle cargo bay, with only an inch of clearance on either side. An even tougher job awaits them today, when they attempt to pluck a much larger Russian station component from orbit and attach it to the U.S. piece without a direct line of sight.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|