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Endeavour

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
It wouldn't be a trip to Southern California without a visit to Disneyland. The Anaheim park is one of several Los Angeles-area landmarks that space shuttle Endeavour will fly over before landing Friday morning at Los Angeles International Airport, according to NASA. Also on deck: the Getty Center, Griffith Observatory and the California Science Center, the retired orbiter's new permanent home. The Los Angeles flyover will mark the end of Endeavour's farewell aerial tour which is slated to begin at dawn Wednesday when it departs Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2012 | Jason Song
One leg of the space shuttle Endeavour's final journey has been delayed because of bad weather, but the craft will still arrive in Los Angeles on schedule Thursday, NASA announced Sunday. Endeavour was to travel from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., to Houston on Monday but the flight was pushed back one day because of storms. Despite the delay, the shuttle -- mounted on a Boeing 747 aircraft -- will still do low-level flyovers in Florida, Texas, New Mexico and Northern and Southern California before touching down in L.A. After arriving, Endeavour will spend several weeks in the United Airlines hangar at Los Angeles International Airport undergoing preparations for a two-day, 12-mile journey on Oct. 12 and 13 via surface streets to the California Science Center in Exposition Park.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
NASA space shuttle Endeavour's departure for Los Angeles has been delayed another day, officials at Kennedy Space Center said Monday. A low-pressure front in the northern Gulf of Mexico is generating stormy weather along Endeavour's flight path, grounding the orbiter until Wednesday. Endeavour, mounted onto a specially modified 747 carrier aircraft, was originally set to be ferried to its final hom e in the California Science Center at sunrise Monday. Managers are considering their options, NASA spokesman Mike Curie said.
SCIENCE
September 16, 2012 | By Amina Khan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
NASA has delayed the space shuttle Endeavour's departure for Los Angeles by 24 hours because of a threat of stormy weather along its flight path, officials announced Sunday. Endeavour, which is scheduled to arrive in Los Angeles on Thursday, will now take off around sunrise Tuesday. It will still arrive in L.A. on schedule - its pit stop in Houston will be shortened to a day. Once it arrives, it will be driven through the streets of Los Angeles to its final destination, the California Science Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
A diva requires special handling and an entourage. Whatever the stage, the space shuttle Endeavour gets both. A constellation of engineers and assembly line workers designed and built the shuttle in Southern California. A universe of scientists hurled it into space on 25 missions. And in the coming weeks, after Endeavour is flown from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to Los Angeles, a cast of hundreds of engineers, police officers and utility and construction workers will ferry the shuttle over city streets to the California Science Center, where it will be permanently displayed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2012 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Before the space shuttle Endeavour glides into retirement at the California Science Center, the spacecraft will take one last spin in the air, flying over a good chunk of California. NASA released new details Friday of low-level photo-op flyovers Endeavour will make before its scheduled Sept. 20 landing at Los Angeles International Airport. That morning, Endeavour will leave Edwards Air Force Base atop its 747 transport aircraft and head north to the Bay Area. There, the shuttle will fly as low as 1,500 feet near NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field and unspecified landmarks in multiple cities, including San Francisco and Sacramento.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Sorry, Houston, you didn't get a space shuttle, but at least you'll get a glimpse of the last one to fly -- on its way to L.A. NASA's plans for delivering the retired shuttle Endeavour to its permanent home in California call for the orbiter to fly on the back of a Boeing 747 over parts of Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and New Mexico, as well as landmarks in San Francisco and Sacramento, before landing at Los Angeles International...
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- The countdown has begun for delivery of the retired space shuttle Endeavour to Los Angeles, the last orbiter that will fly out of Kennedy Space Center in Florida atop a jet. L.A.'s welcome of the Endeavour is shaping up as splashier than Kennedy Space Center's farewell. L.A. is promising a marching band, among other fanfare, fitting for the spectacle of a space shuttle traveling through the city streets ; the program at Kennedy Space Center (expect speeches) is still being put together.
OPINION
September 6, 2012
There are times when we can hug trees with the best of them. But let's face it: Most of the 400 or so specimens that will be uprooted to ease the final path for the space shuttle Endeavour aren't worth all that passionate an embrace. The California Science Center has aroused deeply rooted sentiment against its plans for shuttling the retired shuttle from Los Angeles International Airport along surface streets in Inglewood and Los Angeles to the museum in Exposition Park. The controversy arose because the move will involve cutting down hundreds of trees along major thoroughfares.
OPINION
September 6, 2012
Re "A shuttle trip's ground control," Sept. 4 As I read the article detailing the destruction of 400 beautiful shade trees in South Los Angeles so that the space shuttle Endeavour will be able to make its way from LAX to the California Science Center, I wept - for the trees, for the residents of the affected neighborhoods and for the shortsighted city officials who approved this fiasco. But mostly I wept for the collective heartlessness I see on display. Not one mature tree being destroyed was worth having the shuttle anywhere in this city.
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