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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1989 | Compiled from staff and wire reports
An addiction to opiates produced by the brain while dieting may be the cause of anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder in which patients starve themselves, sometimes to death, Michigan researchers said last week. The scientists say their research, presented at the 40th annual meeting of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, suggested anorexics may have "abnormal biological responses" to diet-triggered opiates.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
February 4, 2008 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Later this month, kisses will be exchanged on cards, in boxes of candy -- and, of course, on the lips. Scientists know how humans kiss and what happens to the body during a kiss, but why people began puckering up in the first place remains unknown. A romantic kiss, blandly stated, involves movement of the lower jaw (the sole movable bone in the head) and contraction of 34 muscles in the face, neck and head -- principally the orbicularis orbis, which surrounds the mouth and allows the lips to pucker.
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NEWS
November 9, 1996
Hans W. Kosterlitz, 93, biochemist whose discovery of opiate-like substances fostered research on painkillers. In 1975, Kosterlitz and his former student John Hughes discovered enkephalins, naturally occurring substances in the brain. They continued to study brain substances, which as a group are called endorphins. The breakthrough paved the way for major research into new kinds of nonaddictive painkillers. Kosterlitz, Hughes and American researcher Solomon H.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | CHRIS ERSKINE
Our two most recent presidents have been joggers. They run to purge the Oval Office air from their lungs and the political poisons from their brains. Two powerful men, both runners, both setting an example for the nation. But I don't let that deter me. "You're running this morning?" my wife asks. "Uh-huh," I say. "Good luck," she says. She's seen me run--strong, powerful strides, arms flopping every which way. Like someone playing tennis without a racket. Like someone dodging bottle rockets.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | CHRIS ERSKINE
Our two most recent presidents have been joggers. They run to purge the Oval Office air from their lungs and the political poisons from their brains. Two powerful men, both runners, both setting an example for the nation. But I don't let that deter me. "You're running this morning?" my wife asks. "Uh-huh," I say. "Good luck," she says. She's seen me run--strong, powerful strides, arms flopping every which way. Like someone playing tennis without a racket. Like someone dodging bottle rockets.
HEALTH
December 29, 2008 | Jay Blahnik, Blahnik is a Laguna Beach- based personal trainer and IDEA Health & Fitness Assn. spokesman. A freelancer, he has appeared in more than 25 videos and is the author of "Full-Body Flexibility."
When I do cardio, I seem to sweat more than most people. I notice that some people do not seem to sweat at all, even when working out hard. Am I burning more calories, or just not as fit as I should be? Peter Ventura The more you contract your muscles during exercise, the more heat you produce. Sweat is necessary to cool the body while exercising because it prevents you from overheating. However, your environment, exercise intensity, fitness level, gender and genetics all play a role in how easily and how much you sweat.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | Lee Dembart
It isn't often I get a book that makes me laugh. Gorman tells us "that the purpose of science is to provide us with something to talk about when art and poetry and music lose their appeal."
HEALTH
February 4, 2008 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Later this month, kisses will be exchanged on cards, in boxes of candy -- and, of course, on the lips. Scientists know how humans kiss and what happens to the body during a kiss, but why people began puckering up in the first place remains unknown. A romantic kiss, blandly stated, involves movement of the lower jaw (the sole movable bone in the head) and contraction of 34 muscles in the face, neck and head -- principally the orbicularis orbis, which surrounds the mouth and allows the lips to pucker.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Just beneath the pale softness of her Botticelli face some vague hint of trepidation shows as Suzanne Farrell floats into the lobby of the Chateau Marmont. Her uneasiness, masked perhaps by the calm and quietude that surrounds the hotel, is almost palpable. But nothing is different. Farrell has always made her aura palpable.
HEALTH
January 17, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise Twenty-seven-year-old Aron Ralston ( James Franco) is a mechanical engineer and thrill-seeker. He is in Utah's Blue John Canyon when he falls down a narrow canyon, and his arm is pinned by a large chalkstone boulder. He watches as his fingers turn blue and gray from insufficient blood flow (ischemia). Though he doesn't appear to be in pain, he is unable to free himself. He has very little food and water, and finally, as he grows dehydrated, he drinks his own urine.
NEWS
November 9, 1996
Hans W. Kosterlitz, 93, biochemist whose discovery of opiate-like substances fostered research on painkillers. In 1975, Kosterlitz and his former student John Hughes discovered enkephalins, naturally occurring substances in the brain. They continued to study brain substances, which as a group are called endorphins. The breakthrough paved the way for major research into new kinds of nonaddictive painkillers. Kosterlitz, Hughes and American researcher Solomon H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1989 | Compiled from staff and wire reports
An addiction to opiates produced by the brain while dieting may be the cause of anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder in which patients starve themselves, sometimes to death, Michigan researchers said last week. The scientists say their research, presented at the 40th annual meeting of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, suggested anorexics may have "abnormal biological responses" to diet-triggered opiates.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | Lee Dembart
It isn't often I get a book that makes me laugh. Gorman tells us "that the purpose of science is to provide us with something to talk about when art and poetry and music lose their appeal."
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Does the sight of a spider paralyze you with fear? If so, Stanford University wants you for a study on how fear affects brain chemistry--and they may be able to rid you of your terror in the bargain. Stanford researchers need 20 to 30 volunteers who are frozen with fear at the very thought of a spider. "It should be handicapping," said Dr. K. Gunnar Gotestam, a visiting professor from Norway who heads the study.
SCIENCE
January 24, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Acupuncture prevents headaches and migraines but faked treatments when needles are incorrectly inserted appear to work nearly as well, German researchers said Wednesday. Their findings suggest the benefits of acupuncture may stem more from belief in the technique, said Klaus Linde, a researcher at the Technical University in Munich, who led the analysis published in the Cochrane Review journal. Studies have shown that acupressure and acupuncture may stimulate the release of endorphins, which can relieve stress, pain and nausea.
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