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BUSINESS
August 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
EPA Inaugurates New Offshore Air Pollution Limits: Oil and gas platforms, drilling-rig ships and other energy development operations in California and Alaska will be subject to new regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The rules, covering pollution sources 25 miles from land or less, will bring offshore facilities in line with pollution limits on the nearby shore.
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NEWS
October 11, 2001 | From Reuters
Cleanup workers will likely spend much of the winter digging up frozen, contaminated soil and chopping down oil-coated trees at the site where crude oil sprayed out of a bullet hole in the trans-Alaska pipeline, officials said Wednesday. Workers may have to clear-cut the spruce and birch forest site affected by the spill, then plant new trees and bushes next spring, said Tim Woolston, a spokesman for Alyeska Pipeline Service Co., the consortium that operates the pipeline system.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to move more oil out of Alaska to offset supplies lost due to the Persian Gulf crisis are being complicated by state and federal investigations into charges that workers on the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline falsified inspections of corrosion problems. The investigations center on allegations made by a former employee of a pipeline subcontractor that workers ignored potential cracks and corrosion, were poorly trained and used drugs and alcohol on the job.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1992 | From Reuters
When Gov. Walter Hickel meets President Bush today, he is expected to press for an end to what Alaskans consider an unfair ban on the export of North Slope crude oil, a Hickel spokesman said Sunday. "It's my understanding that they're going to discuss it," said Hickel's press secretary, John Manly. It would take a presidential order to lift the ban, and state officials are hopeful that one is on the way--even though Bush renewed the ban Sept. 30. "Obviously, we'd really like to see that happen.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1992 | From Reuters
When Gov. Walter Hickel meets President Bush today, he is expected to press for an end to what Alaskans consider an unfair ban on the export of North Slope crude oil, a Hickel spokesman said Sunday. "It's my understanding that they're going to discuss it," said Hickel's press secretary, John Manly. It would take a presidential order to lift the ban, and state officials are hopeful that one is on the way--even though Bush renewed the ban Sept. 30. "Obviously, we'd really like to see that happen.
NEWS
October 11, 2001 | From Reuters
Cleanup workers will likely spend much of the winter digging up frozen, contaminated soil and chopping down oil-coated trees at the site where crude oil sprayed out of a bullet hole in the trans-Alaska pipeline, officials said Wednesday. Workers may have to clear-cut the spruce and birch forest site affected by the spill, then plant new trees and bushes next spring, said Tim Woolston, a spokesman for Alyeska Pipeline Service Co., the consortium that operates the pipeline system.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1990 | From Reuters
Crude oil output by nations outside OPEC eased 1.1% in the third quarter despite soaring oil prices and efforts to fill a gap in OPEC production, a Reuters survey completed Friday shows. The 360,000 barrel-per-day drop from the second quarter to 32.39 million barrels per day reflects slumping output in the United States and Soviet Union and maintenance work in Britain and Norway.
OPINION
September 29, 1991
The general tone of the series ("America's Energy Frontier--Alaska, Oil and the Environment," Part A, Sept. 15-16) painted a bleak picture of oil development in the Arctic, but in reality the oil industry has a good and improving environmental record on the North Slope. The industry has given considerable attention to regional ecological concerns and strict environmental standards apply to oil field operations. The Department of the Interior and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game believe that new, state-of-the-art development in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)
NATIONAL
September 9, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
SEATTLE -- A potential new energy frontier opened early Sunday in the U.S. Arctic, as Royal Dutch Shell plumbed a drill bit into the bed of the Chukchi Sea, 70 miles off the coast of northwest Alaska. The oil company that has spent six years and $4.5 billion trying to launch America's first offshore oil production in the Arctic announced that its Noble Discoverer had anchored northwest of Alaska's North Slope and begun drilling the “top hole” of an exploration well. The work was the first step toward drilling a pilot hole that will go about 1,300 feet deep.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Even as the first offshore drilling in the Arctic in nearly two decades is poised to get underway, Obama administration officials said Tuesday they are preparing to open additional areas of the Arctic Ocean to oil and gas exploration. Such exploration will be part of a “targeted leasing” strategy that will place a few of the most sensitive areas - including prized wildlife habitat just north of Barrow, Alaska - off-limits but will allow new leasing in 2016 in the Chukchi Sea and 2017 in the Beaufort Sea. The full scope of the offshore-leasing program in the Arctic for 2012-17 will not be released for another several days, but U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar made it clear that the U.S. plans to expand the march of drilling rigs into the Arctic after Shell's initial exploratory drilling program this summer.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
EPA Inaugurates New Offshore Air Pollution Limits: Oil and gas platforms, drilling-rig ships and other energy development operations in California and Alaska will be subject to new regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The rules, covering pollution sources 25 miles from land or less, will bring offshore facilities in line with pollution limits on the nearby shore.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to move more oil out of Alaska to offset supplies lost due to the Persian Gulf crisis are being complicated by state and federal investigations into charges that workers on the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline falsified inspections of corrosion problems. The investigations center on allegations made by a former employee of a pipeline subcontractor that workers ignored potential cracks and corrosion, were poorly trained and used drugs and alcohol on the job.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect George W. Bush named Alcoa Chairman Paul H. O'Neill as Treasury secretary Wednesday and signaled his intention to move aggressively to head off what he fears may be an economic downturn. In a separate announcement later in the day, Bush nominated three other Cabinet members: business executive and longtime associate Don Evans for Commerce secretary, former California agriculture director Ann M.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN and TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's energy plan, unveiled Thursday, helped spark a broad rally across the energy sector and among firms that stand to benefit by selling equipment and services to oil and natural gas companies. Yet Wall Street has been taking a cautious stance toward energy shares in recent months, and Thursday's rally doesn't change much, some analysts and money managers say.
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