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NEWS
February 16, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this shivering, snowy, blockaded city, people do their complaining with humor and by candlelight. Question: What's the best kind of birth control in Armenia? Answer: Who needs birth control when we all live in overcoats? Armenia was once considered among the most promising of all the former Soviet republics. Now, in this newborn nation it is simply too cold to undress. People sleep in their clothes and fantasize about a hot bath. The politics of this debacle are not simple.
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NEWS
February 16, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this shivering, snowy, blockaded city, people do their complaining with humor and by candlelight. Question: What's the best kind of birth control in Armenia? Answer: Who needs birth control when we all live in overcoats? Armenia was once considered among the most promising of all the former Soviet republics. Now, in this newborn nation it is simply too cold to undress. People sleep in their clothes and fantasize about a hot bath. The politics of this debacle are not simple.
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NEWS
December 25, 1992 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Armen Grigorian, a 32-year-old presidential adviser, tramped home on an icy pavement. The unlit street beside him was almost bereft of traffic because there is no fuel here. He bought his supper from a stand because most shops suffer shortages; a bottle of vodka in his pocket cost almost as much as the president's monthly wage.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the third winter of a crippling wartime blockade, this energy-starved city has no fuel to heat its central maternity hospital. Women in labor are wheeled into delivery rooms swaddled in sweaters and scarves. Nurses tuck hot water bottles into incubators to keep premature infants from freezing. Fuel is too precious to waste on such luxuries as laundry. Hospital workers wash sheets and diapers--3,000 a day--in icy water by hand.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the third winter of a crippling wartime blockade, this energy-starved city has no fuel to heat its central maternity hospital. Women in labor are wheeled into delivery rooms swaddled in sweaters and scarves. Nurses tuck hot water bottles into incubators to keep premature infants from freezing. Fuel is too precious to waste on such luxuries as laundry. Hospital workers wash sheets and diapers--3,000 a day--in icy water by hand.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | Associated Press
Natural gas began flowing Friday to energy-starved Armenia after the country's sabotaged pipeline was patched for the fourth time since January, the Interfax news agency said.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Armenia's Oil, Gas Reserves to Be Assessed: Announcing a potential new foreign market for California energy technology, Armenia, the U.S. and California have agreed to conduct a resource assessment of the new democracy's energy potential. Part of the agreement gives preference to U.S. companies to provide personnel and equipment for exploration and production.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1993
1993 may be a busy year for Turkey. If the Serbs move against Muslim Albanians in Kosovo or Macedonia, drawing Albania into the Balkans war, the Turks have promised to intervene in what was once a part of the Turkish Empire. If the Greek Cypriots move against the Turkish Cypriots when, as seems likely, the U.N. forces leave Cyprus next July, Turkey may intervene there too.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Armen Grigorian, a 32-year-old presidential adviser, tramped home on an icy pavement. The unlit street beside him was almost bereft of traffic because there is no fuel here. He bought his supper from a stand because most shops suffer shortages; a bottle of vodka in his pocket cost almost as much as the president's monthly wage.
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