Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEnergy California
IN THE NEWS

Energy California

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 11, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California may be facing a persistent, escalating glut of electricity as a result of its buying too much power through long-term contracts, according to energy experts and a Los Angeles Times analysis. The surplus, projected to peak in 2004, could pose a costly burden to ratepayers unless electricity demand rises substantially, according to The Times' analysis, which reviewed the state's power purchases and projections for demand over the next several years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
RAWLINS, Wyo. - A relentless wind howls day after day across this high desert, pouring through a low gap on the Continental Divide. "This is one of the windiest places in the nation," screams Bill Miller above the din of gusting air. Miller, a wiry man who spent much of his career in the oil and gas business, is in charge of building a massive wind farm on a cattle ranch owned by Anschutz Corp., better known in Los Angeles as co-owner of...
Advertisement
NEWS
January 24, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Round-the-clock demand on the state's energy grid has hampered the ability of Pacific Gas & Electric's largest hydroelectric plant to operate, forcing temporary shutdowns and limiting output of the massive Helms powerhouse to well below its 1,200-megawatt capacity. During the spring snowmelt in the Sierra Nevada, Helms can light up much, if not all, of San Francisco. It generates almost 10 times as much power as PG&E's next-largest hydroelectric plant.
OPINION
December 5, 2012
California can't stop global warming on its own. Its environmental regulations won't save the whole world, and its energy policies won't wean the nation off fossil fuels What it can do is set an example, and it has approved radical laws and programs to achieve that - such as a renewable portfolio standard that sets a course for the state to get 33% of its power from renewable sources by 2020, a cap-and-trade system for greenhouse gases and...
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's Environmental Protection Agency ruling that probably will require the use of ethanol in California's reformulated gasoline could give a huge boost to several projects in the state that seek to produce the fuel additive from crops such as sugar cane and corn, and agricultural waste such as rice straw, forest thinnings and orchard prunings.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2001 | Associated Press
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by Houston-based Duke Energy against Gov. Gray Davis over energy contracts that California seized earlier this year from Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas & Electric. U.S. District Judge Terry Hatter ruled that Davis has immunity under the 11th Amendment, which prevents residents of one state from suing the government of another state in federal court. Duke filed suit on Feb.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All the signs of human activity are still there. Papers and manuals litter tables and desks. Handwritten charts cover some of the walls. Signs warn that "Ear Protection Is Required" to protect workers from the deafening noise. Everything is there--except the people. Echoing through the silent building are the footsteps of Glen Gordon, last manager of the state Department of Water Resources' Bottle Rock Geothermal Power Plant before it was shut down in 1990. Disappointment is etched in his face.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1992 | CHRIS KRAUL and MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Magma Power--an alternative energy company here that makes a solid profit generating geothermal power in the Imperial Valley--will find out early next month what the future of its industry will be in California. A ruling expected from the state Public Utilities Commission is expected to lay out how much of the future power capacity of the state's investor-owned utilities--Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric Co. and Pacific Gas & Electric Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chained to the electric oxygen machine that keeps her alive, Patricia Roy was breathing easier Thursday at news that California may be edging toward solving the electricity crisis. The Santa Monica emphysema patient was among thousands jarred last week when Southern California Edison Co. warned that it could not guarantee uninterrupted power--although her doctor said she will die if her air supply is cut off for more than an hour or so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has all the trappings of a parochial, not-in-my-backyard brouhaha: anxiety over property values, the environment and local business. But the subject of this particular debate--a proposed $270-million electricity transmission line starting in this scrubby outpost of chicken wire, strip mall churches and tumbleweeds--has ominous implications for all of California. Effectively using California's energy crisis as ammunition, San Diego Gas & Electric Co.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
That ray of light you see peeking through all the clouds darkening California's future? That's the sun. More specifically, solar power, in which California is the hands-down national leader. The state's installed solar generating capacity of about 1.2 gigawatts - the equivalent of two big conventional power plants and enough to fill the electrical demand from nearly 200,000 homes for a year - easily outstrips the next 10 highest-ranked states. It's also the fastest-growing solar market in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2002 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California will drop its lawsuits and demands for refunds from Williams Cos. under a settlement announced Friday by the troubled energy trading company. Without releasing details, Williams said it had reached an agreement in principle to rework its $3.8 billion worth of long-term electricity contracts with California. In return, Williams would get relief from the state's demand that it give back profits earned during the electricity crisis of 2000 and 2001. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California could again experience blackouts and runaway power costs unless federal regulators extend temporary price limits on electricity imposed throughout the West last year, state officials warned Congress Thursday. Gov. Gray Davis initially had given a cool reception to the flexible price limits set by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, saying that they fell short of his call for direct price-setting.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a mile beneath the Imperial Valley, heat from magma boils a mixture of water, salt and minerals into a briny soup. Steel piping drilled into the desert floor taps this reservoir. The superheated liquid flashes into steam, spinning electric turbines that generate a small portion of the power that zips across Southern California Edison's massive transmission grid. The steam condenses into water and is injected back below the surface, allowing the cycle to start again. CalEnergy Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new state public power authority held its first meeting Friday and was quickly confronted with questions about whether it is still needed. A new state report issued Thursday suggested that California's electricity crisis is waning, causing critics to ask whether a large new government program is a good idea. But despite a cool summer without blackouts and a forecast of growing electricity surpluses, authority Chairman S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California is so rapidly reversing its electricity shortfall that blackouts are unlikely next summer and supplies will far outstrip demand by 2004, according to a new state energy supply forecast. The outlook is so rosy that some officials say it calls into question the need for a new state power agency to be launched today. At the same time, the report offers good news for Gov.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mood was grim, funereal. Captains of the nation's wind energy industry had gathered in San Francisco for their 1987 annual convention, but no one was having much fun. No wonder. The American wind industry, hatched in a climate of giddy optimism in the early 1980s, had taken a frightful tumble. Lucrative federal and state tax credits, which prompted rows of windmills to sprout like wildflowers in California's gusty passes, had expired, dramatically slowing new installations.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wholesale energy prices on the California Power Exchange continued to soar in August, pushing the state's utilities more than $3 billion into a financial hole and adding to calls for dismantling the state's deregulated power market. The chairman of Sempra Energy, parent of San Diego Gas & Electric, called on federal regulators Friday to scrap the power exchange as unworkable and suggested a new system of price controls, generation incentives and mandatory metering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chairman S. David Freeman gavels the new state Public Power Authority into session today, he will launch an agency that is the centerpiece of California's plan to tame its volatile electricity market. Conceived during the winter energy crisis, the five-member California Consumer Power and Conservation Financing Authority has emerged with broad powers and the authority to spend $5 billion to ensure that the exorbitant price spikes and blackouts of last winter and spring never occur again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
An ordinance giving Los Angeles residents a temporary break on their natural gas bills was signed Wednesday by City Councilman and acting Mayor Mark Ridley-Thomas, who said it will mean a typical savings of about $2 a month. The measure, previously approved by the City Council to cushion the impact of rising gas prices, will reduce the city utility users tax on natural gas from 10% to 6% for December through March.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|