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NEWS
May 24, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-five stories beneath the frozen lakes and black-spruce scrub of northern Quebec, in chambers blasted out of 3-billion-year-old granite, the "emancipation" of Canada's Francophone province is under way. There are no secessionist cries ringing in the dank air down here, no banners borne aloft, no clamoring throngs--just a lot of French-speaking hard hats making their way up and down metal stairways, in command of welding torches and cranes.
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NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush met Thursday with his Mexican counterpart, Vicente Fox, to discuss temporary visas for Mexican workers and plans for long-range energy development among Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. The meeting was the third for the pair, who talked at the Summit of the Americas in Canada last month and met in Mexico in February. Fox said they discussed long-range plans for the U.S. to import energy from Mexico and Canada, which have large reserves of oil and natural gas.
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NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush met Thursday with his Mexican counterpart, Vicente Fox, to discuss temporary visas for Mexican workers and plans for long-range energy development among Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. The meeting was the third for the pair, who talked at the Summit of the Americas in Canada last month and met in Mexico in February. Fox said they discussed long-range plans for the U.S. to import energy from Mexico and Canada, which have large reserves of oil and natural gas.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-five stories beneath the frozen lakes and black-spruce scrub of northern Quebec, in chambers blasted out of 3-billion-year-old granite, the "emancipation" of Canada's Francophone province is under way. There are no secessionist cries ringing in the dank air down here, no banners borne aloft, no clamoring throngs--just a lot of French-speaking hard hats making their way up and down metal stairways, in command of welding torches and cranes.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1989 | BILL DIETRICH, Special to The Times and Dietrich writes for the Seattle Times
Each summer as demand for energy rises in California to power air conditioners, it falls in British Columbia as heaters switch off. At the same time, the Canadian rivers that can turn electric turbines are gushing with snowmelt. The potential symmetry of this has not been lost on West Coast energy planners, who increasingly talk about the possibility of a unified power line grid stretching from the Yukon to the Mexican border. The rewards are clear.
WORLD
May 28, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
An aging nuclear reactor that produces a third of the world's medical isotope supply is expected to be out of operation for at least three months, officials said. Crews have found the source of a heavy water leak at the Chalk River reactor in eastern Ontario, but more inspections will be needed before a repair plan can be worked out, Atomic Energy of Canada said.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1998 | Dow Jones
Fluor Corp.'s Fluor Daniel unit received a contract valued at about $14 million from Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. to design and build a medical isotopes processing facility near Toronto. Fluor Daniel said Monday that the project's total installed cost is about $98 million.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
Daewoo Group Chairman Kim Woo Choong and two other South Korean industrialists were indicted over the weekend on bribery charges, prosecutors said. The others are Dong-A Construction Group Chairman Choi Won Suk and Samsung Engineering & Construction Chairman Park Ki Suk. They weren't detained physically. Prosecutors said Chung Hun Mok, former chairman of Hyundai Engineering & Construction, will be investigated on the same charge when he returns from his stay in the United States.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1989 | BILL DIETRICH, Special to The Times and Dietrich writes for the Seattle Times
Each summer as demand for energy rises in California to power air conditioners, it falls in British Columbia as heaters switch off. At the same time, the Canadian rivers that can turn electric turbines are gushing with snowmelt. The potential symmetry of this has not been lost on West Coast energy planners, who increasingly talk about the possibility of a unified power line grid stretching from the Yukon to the Mexican border. The rewards are clear.
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