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BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Shan Li
The energy industry scored a big win Tuesday when a federal judge tossed out a Securities and Exchange Commission rule that  required oil and mining companies to disclose payments to foreign governments. Deeming the regulation arbitrary and capricious, U.S. District Judge John Bates in Washington noted that the SEC failed to include exemptions in cases in which foreign governments explicitly ban public disclosures, according to Fuel Fix, a website reporting the industry. The regulation was issued under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010, intended to bring financial reforms following the Great Recession.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 2014 | By Shan Li
Texas billionaire T. Boone Pickens thinks his long bet on natural gas is finally paying off. The legendary oilman has long declared it his mission to wean America off its addiction to foreign oil. He co-founded an Orange County company that builds natural gas stations around the country and sank billions into wind turbines. Pickens' gambles have not always paid off. He lost an estimated $150 million of his personal fortune in wind farming, and admits that he was a couple of decades early into natural gas. But he thinks the time has come for natural gas to shake up the energy industry.
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OPINION
November 9, 2012 | By Bill McKibben
It's not just Sandy. Sandy was off-the-charts terrible, a storm that broke every record in the books: for storm surge, for barometric pressure, for sheer size. But it also blew in toward the end of what will be the warmest year in U.S. history. It was a year that already had seen a summer-in-March heat wave described by meteorologists as the most statistically freakish weather event in the continent's history, an epic drought that raised grain prices 40% around the world and a record-setting melt of Arctic ice. It was a year in which scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, who couldn't take the subway to their Manhattan offices in the days following Sandy, calculated that the 1-degree rise in global temperature we've already seen has raised the chance of extreme heat events by an order of magnitude.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
In the first case of its kind, a large energy company has pleaded guilty to killing birds at its large wind turbine farms in Wyoming and has agreed to pay $1 million as punishment. Duke Energy Renewables -- a subsidiary of the Fortune 250 Duke Energy Corp. -- admitted to violating the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act in connection with the deaths of more than 160 birds, including 14 golden eagles, according to court documents.  The deaths took place between 2009 and 2013 at two Duke sites in Wyoming that have 176 wind turbines, according to court documents.
OPINION
September 30, 2002
Re "Energy Dealings Ruled Illegal," Sept. 24: Now that we have proof that the energy companies manipulated the market, all Californians should demand an apology from Vice President Dick Cheney for his idiotic, self-righteous remarks last year blaming us for the crisis. Alex Magdaleno Camarillo
BUSINESS
May 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Bolivia's leftist President Evo Morales decreed a takeover of leading Bolivian telephone company Entel after accusing the company of failing to meet commitments to expand phone network coverage. He also announced a $6.3-million deal with Spanish oil company Repsol, which will cede control of its Andina subsidiary to the government. The government will pay more than $37 million to acquire controlling stakes in three other energy companies.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2006 | From Reuters
Energy companies will avoid paying billions of dollars in U.S. royalties normally owed on oil and natural gas drilled in the Gulf of Mexico because of language left out of the leasing contracts by mistake, the Interior Department told Congress on Wednesday.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- A coalition of energy companies, environmentalists and Pennsylvania-based philanthropies announced Wednesday the creation of a center that would provide more stringent standards for fracking and natural gas development in the Eastern United States. The Marcellus Shale formation, which extends from central New York to eastern Kentucky, is the site of a vast gas boom, most of it centered in Pennsylvania. But the production method of fracking, high-volume hydraulic fracturing that has tapped the gas deposits, has touched off concerns about the impact of such wide-scale industrial development on air and water quality.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1998 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staking a claim to part of the state's phone business, Southern California Edison Co. this week became the first major energy company in California to seek approval to become a wholesale phone service provider.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2003 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
California agencies and utilities today will urge federal regulators to reconsider a March 26 decision on how much energy companies should refund the state for overcharges during the electricity crisis, contending that the decision failed to take into account key evidence of misconduct. In a request for a new hearing before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the California parties will argue that the new evidence of market manipulation they submitted this year was ignored by FERC.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
The gig: Lyndon Rive, 36, chief executive of SolarCity Corp., a company co-founded in 2006 with his older brother, Peter, that helped popularize a new direction in residential solar power development. The San Mateo, Calif., company installs solar panels for homes, businesses and government entities. But instead of selling the panels to the customer, SolarCity usually retains ownership of them and sells the electricity to the client. That cuts out much of the upfront cost involved with going solar.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2013 | By Shan Li
Bolstered by the success of new technology, U.S. oil reserves surged by 15% in 2011 to the highest level recorded since 1985, a report said. Proved oil reserves jumped by a record 3.8 billion barrels to 29 billion barrels, the third annual increase, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. About 3.6 billion barrels of that comes from so-called "tight" oil plays, which often require the kind of new technology that has unlocked previously inaccessible reserves. Adam Sieminski, administrator at the energy agency, said horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, known as fracking, has "continued to increase oil and natural gas reserves.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Shan Li
The energy industry scored a big win Tuesday when a federal judge tossed out a Securities and Exchange Commission rule that  required oil and mining companies to disclose payments to foreign governments. Deeming the regulation arbitrary and capricious, U.S. District Judge John Bates in Washington noted that the SEC failed to include exemptions in cases in which foreign governments explicitly ban public disclosures, according to Fuel Fix, a website reporting the industry. The regulation was issued under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010, intended to bring financial reforms following the Great Recession.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
California needs to strengthen regulation of hydraulic fracturing, according to a UC Berkeley Law School report that identified a number of shortcomings in state oversight of the controversial practice.    Known as fracking, the technique involves the high-pressure injection of chemical-laced fluids into the ground to crack rock formations and extract oil and gas. Although not new to California, the practice has come under increasing scrutiny recently...
NATIONAL
March 20, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- A coalition of energy companies, environmentalists and Pennsylvania-based philanthropies announced Wednesday the creation of a center that would provide more stringent standards for fracking and natural gas development in the Eastern United States. The Marcellus Shale formation, which extends from central New York to eastern Kentucky, is the site of a vast gas boom, most of it centered in Pennsylvania. But the production method of fracking, high-volume hydraulic fracturing that has tapped the gas deposits, has touched off concerns about the impact of such wide-scale industrial development on air and water quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2012 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Under pressure from state lawmakers and environmentalists, Gov. Jerry Brown's administration released draft regulations for hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," the controversial drilling process driving the nation's oil and gas boom. The proposed rules, released Tuesday, would require energy companies to disclose for the first time the chemicals they inject deep into the ground to break apart rock and release oil. They also would have to reveal the location of the wells where they use the procedure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2002 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SACRAMENTO -- Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer accused four energy companies Tuesday of gouging Californians and demanded at least $2 billion in penalties. Lockyer filed four lawsuits in state court alleging violation of California's business and professions code. The suits are the latest in a series of actions by Lockyer to recoup money Californians paid for electricity in 2001. They won't be the last, he said.
OPINION
November 18, 2012
Re “Cut their power,” Opinion, Nov. 9 The largest oil and gas companies are already “energy” companies, as author Bill McKibben defines it. Chevron, for instance, is the largest geothermal power producer in the world. Instead of proposing to “break the power of the fossil fuel industry” to reduce global warming, as McKibben suggests, we should try a more realistic approach: Show them that embracing renewable technology makes good economic sense. The Department of Energy needs oil and gas companies to partner with geothermal companies to “co-produce” electricity from the waste heat inherent in oil and gas production.
OPINION
November 18, 2012
Re “Cut their power,” Opinion, Nov. 9 The largest oil and gas companies are already “energy” companies, as author Bill McKibben defines it. Chevron, for instance, is the largest geothermal power producer in the world. Instead of proposing to “break the power of the fossil fuel industry” to reduce global warming, as McKibben suggests, we should try a more realistic approach: Show them that embracing renewable technology makes good economic sense. The Department of Energy needs oil and gas companies to partner with geothermal companies to “co-produce” electricity from the waste heat inherent in oil and gas production.
OPINION
November 9, 2012 | By Bill McKibben
It's not just Sandy. Sandy was off-the-charts terrible, a storm that broke every record in the books: for storm surge, for barometric pressure, for sheer size. But it also blew in toward the end of what will be the warmest year in U.S. history. It was a year that already had seen a summer-in-March heat wave described by meteorologists as the most statistically freakish weather event in the continent's history, an epic drought that raised grain prices 40% around the world and a record-setting melt of Arctic ice. It was a year in which scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, who couldn't take the subway to their Manhattan offices in the days following Sandy, calculated that the 1-degree rise in global temperature we've already seen has raised the chance of extreme heat events by an order of magnitude.
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