Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEnergy Cuba
IN THE NEWS

Energy Cuba

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This village in the steamy Sierra Maestra of poor, eastern Cuba lacks paved roads. But it does have street lights, a dozen of them, lining the hamlet's central dirt path. None of the shanties here has an indoor bathroom. But each boasts the same lawn decoration: a pole with two solar panels and a storage battery. Along with the dozen solar panels that power the village water pump, the lights and poles are a $35,000 solar-power gift from the government of India.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This village in the steamy Sierra Maestra of poor, eastern Cuba lacks paved roads. But it does have street lights, a dozen of them, lining the hamlet's central dirt path. None of the shanties here has an indoor bathroom. But each boasts the same lawn decoration: a pole with two solar panels and a storage battery. Along with the dozen solar panels that power the village water pump, the lights and poles are a $35,000 solar-power gift from the government of India.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuba announced Friday that it is closing many factories and curtailing public transportation, street lighting and television programming because of uncertainty over fuel supplies once guaranteed by the Soviet Union. The drastic energy-saving measures are expected to throw hundreds of thousands of Cubans out of work.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuba announced Friday that it is closing many factories and curtailing public transportation, street lighting and television programming because of uncertainty over fuel supplies once guaranteed by the Soviet Union. The drastic energy-saving measures are expected to throw hundreds of thousands of Cubans out of work.
MAGAZINE
November 20, 2005 | GIL GARCETTI
They are at opposite ends of the "artistic" spectrum but equally passionate, creative in the face of adversity and overwhelmingly talented, and they launched my second career as a photographer. The first were the ironworkers at Walt Disney Concert Hall, whom I began photographing shortly after leaving office as Los Angeles County district attorney. Their athleticism and skill on a project that seemed impossible astounded me.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In a world where the United States is trading with Vietnam, considering an end to the embargo of North Korea and arranging food aid to Libya and Iran, Cuba stands like a relic of history. The island nation and its giant neighbor seem stuck in a time warp, with the U.S. policy toward Cuba still centered on the trade embargo first imposed by President John F. Kennedy in 1962. Yet rational experts say that life in Cuba has become too complex to simply open the door to U.S. investment.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The bearded man in the hard hat, waiting at a bus stop for a ride up the crimson mountain to the nickel mine just outside town, says he pays little heed to global politics. But this forklift operator does know that in the two years since Canadians began investing in the mine here, his life has grown better. "They have improved our wages and increased our productivity," he said of the outsiders.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|