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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | TED CILWICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here in the heart of potato country, where the swift-flowing Snake River generates cheap electricity, people were both amused and scornful as they brushed aside Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn's recent proposal to channel river water to parched Southern California. Among themselves, though, Idahoans bicker fiercely over use of the Snake, which was named for its meandering 1,038-mile course.
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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | TED CILWICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here in the heart of potato country, where the swift-flowing Snake River generates cheap electricity, people were both amused and scornful as they brushed aside Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn's recent proposal to channel river water to parched Southern California. Among themselves, though, Idahoans bicker fiercely over use of the Snake, which was named for its meandering 1,038-mile course.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 1988
Richard T. French has been named president of Kaiser Engineers Hanford Co. to replace Alex L. Lindsay, who is being reassigned to the Oakland headquarters. The appointment will be effective in mid-February. Kaiser Engineers Hanford is the engineer-constructor at the U.S. Department of Energy's, Richland, Wash., operations office. French is currently operations manager, performance assurance and technical support for EG&G Idaho Inc. at the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS
Members of North Hollywood High School's Science Bowl team were honored Friday at City Hall for their second place finish in the national science competition last month. The five students--four seniors and a junior--beat out some 8,000 others to advance to the final round of the event, in which competitors race to answer questions about astronomy, chemistry, computer science and other subjects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tired of spending $200 million or more per mile on a subway? Shop at the Kmart of public transit, where a futuristic rail system can be had for a bargain-basement price of $2 million to $4 million per mile. So say the promoters of the CyberTran (for Cybernetic Transportation), who exhibited one of the rail cars Thursday at the Burbank offices of Calstart, the public-private consortium developing transportation technology. The event kicked off an effort to secure $20 million in public and private funds for construction of a 10-mile CyberTran demonstration track at an undetermined site in California.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Environmental Protection Agency should draft water pollution standards aimed at protecting wildlife refuges and the birds and animals using them, congressional investigators said Monday. A report from the General Accounting Office also called on Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel to seek changes in the Clean Water Act if he finds any more refuges contaminated by a single source of agricultural runoff water like the Kesterson refuge in the San Joaquin Valley of California.
OPINION
October 8, 2007 | Duncan B. Hollis, Duncan B. Hollis is an associate professor of law at Temple University and a contributor to the international law blog Opinio Juris.
Estonia claimed to be under attack last spring, but not by guns or bombs. This assault came in the form of data requests from more than a million computers. It overwhelmed the Baltic nation's computer networks, crashing e-mail for its parliament, taking down emergency phone lines and freezing online services of government offices, banks, universities and hospitals. Estonia accused Russia of conducting a cyberwar in retaliation for a decision to move a Soviet-era war memorial.
OPINION
October 14, 2009 | James D. Zirin, James D. Zirin is a New York lawyer and member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He co-hosts the cable talk show "Digital Age."
In May, President Obama completed his long-awaited "cyberspace policy review," concluding that cyberspace is a strategic asset that must be safeguarded from attack as a national security priority. He recalled how hackers had gotten into his own campaign servers, and he worried that crucial infrastructure, public and private, was vulnerable to hackers, cyber terrorists and even other governments. The president promised to appoint a permanent "cyber czar" who would coordinate the work of federal agencies charged with protecting us. But since "acting cyber-security czar" Melissa Hathaway resigned in August, the post has been unfilled.
NEWS
October 19, 2008 | Tom Pelton, Baltimore Sun
The century-old dam on the Susquehanna River doesn't look like an energy source of the future. Weeds sprout out of cracks in the weathered Holtwood Hydroelectric Dam, 12 miles upriver from Maryland. Inside the generating building, antique brass volt meters look like something from Dr. Frankenstein's lab. Water snakes slither across the floor. Despite the decrepit appearance, a Pennsylvania power company is planning to spend $350 million to build water-powered turbines next to the dam. The first new hydroelectric power plant in the East in 20 years, it would double the dam's electrical output, providing another 100,000 homes with pollution-free electricity, the company said.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Energy is studying the possibility of shipping bomb-grade uranium fuel from foreign research nuclear reactors through the Port of Long Beach to government facilities in other states. The study, which includes other U.S. ports as well, is still in the preliminary stages and a final decision on where to import the spent nuclear fuel rods is months away, said Energy Department spokesman Brad Bugger.
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