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BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enlightened bureaucrats at Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry set worthy national goals and then marshal the country's resources to reach the goals. If you think that is how Japan Inc. works, you might want to take a look at the nation's energy policy.
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WORLD
March 25, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Japanese officials are considering introducing daylight saving time to help cope with severe power shortages that likely will last for months. Japan has resisted daylight saving time for nearly 60 years, dumping the practice after the U.S. occupation ended. While Japanese politicians have attempted to bring back daylight saving time in recent years, skeptics have feared it would just keep workers in their offices longer. But according to Kyodo News agency, Japanese industry minister Banri Kaieda said bringing back daylight saving time may help avoid major blackouts in the summer, when energy consumption peaks because of scorching temperatures.
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NEWS
April 19, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some 60 aging coal miners lace up their boots, snap on headlamps and raise their fists three times in the air with shouts of "Yosh!" in a pledge to complete their shifts without an accident. Then the mostly middle-aged men head toward the mouth of the No. 2 Incline Shaft, lights bobbing, to begin the 40-minute trip into this damp, dusty world 2,000 feet beneath the sea.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some 60 aging coal miners lace up their boots, snap on headlamps and raise their fists three times in the air with shouts of "Yosh!" in a pledge to complete their shifts without an accident. Then the mostly middle-aged men head toward the mouth of the No. 2 Incline Shaft, lights bobbing, to begin the 40-minute trip into this damp, dusty world 2,000 feet beneath the sea.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The multimillion-dollar artworks snapped up by Japanese collectors at highly publicized auctions are only "a tiny, tiny portion of the iceberg" in the Japanese art market, Ikkan Sanada told his audience at the 1989 Artnews World Art Market Conference. A two-day meeting this week at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan offered about 300 participants a tightly packed program on market-related topics ranging from business tips for dealers to "untapped potentials" for collectors. "Inside the Japanese Art Market" was the subject addressed late Thursday afternoon by Sanada, director of Ikkan Art International Inc., a Japanese art advisory service in Manhattan.
WORLD
March 25, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Japanese officials are considering introducing daylight saving time to help cope with severe power shortages that likely will last for months. Japan has resisted daylight saving time for nearly 60 years, dumping the practice after the U.S. occupation ended. While Japanese politicians have attempted to bring back daylight saving time in recent years, skeptics have feared it would just keep workers in their offices longer. But according to Kyodo News agency, Japanese industry minister Banri Kaieda said bringing back daylight saving time may help avoid major blackouts in the summer, when energy consumption peaks because of scorching temperatures.
WORLD
December 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea may slow the disabling of its nuclear facilities, blaming a delay in the delivery of energy aid. Japan's Kyodo News agency quoted a North Korean Foreign Ministry official as saying his country had no choice but to adjust its actions to the delay. North Korea agreed to shut down its nuclear facilities and declare the extent of its nuclear activities by year's end in return for fuel and diplomatic incentives.
SCIENCE
March 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists in energy-poor Japan say they have found a new source of gasoline -- cattle dung. Sakae Shibusawa of the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology said his team had successfully extracted 0.042 ounce of gasoline from every 3.5 ounces of cow dung by applying high pressure and heat. "The new technology will be a boon for livestock breeders" to reduce the burden of disposing of large amounts of waste, Shibusawa said.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2008 | Ken Bensinger, Times Staff Writer
Mitsubishi Motors Corp. will bring electric cars to the U.S. starting this fall in test programs announced Thursday with Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and Southern California Edison. The Japanese automaker will deliver fewer than a dozen of its tiny i-MiEV electric cars to the utilities, but the company said it planned to use the programs to determine whether the U.S. was a viable mass market for such vehicles.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enlightened bureaucrats at Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry set worthy national goals and then marshal the country's resources to reach the goals. If you think that is how Japan Inc. works, you might want to take a look at the nation's energy policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The multimillion-dollar artworks snapped up by Japanese collectors at highly publicized auctions are only "a tiny, tiny portion of the iceberg" in the Japanese art market, Ikkan Sanada told his audience at the 1989 Artnews World Art Market Conference. A two-day meeting this week at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan offered about 300 participants a tightly packed program on market-related topics ranging from business tips for dealers to "untapped potentials" for collectors. "Inside the Japanese Art Market" was the subject addressed late Thursday afternoon by Sanada, director of Ikkan Art International Inc., a Japanese art advisory service in Manhattan.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1999 | Reuters
Mazda Motor Corp. appointed Mark Fields, a 38-year-old American as president in a move seen as breathing fresh energy into Japan's fifth-largest auto maker and Ford Motor Co. affiliate. Fields, who joined Mazda in 1998 after 10 years at Ford, becomes the youngest president of a Japanese car maker and replaces James Miller, who retired after two years at the helm.
WORLD
January 10, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner faces a stiff challenge this week as he tries to convince China, Japan and South Korea to reduce their dependency on Iranian oil and natural gas. The Obama administration is pressing those countries to help squeeze Iran financially, hoping to compel the Middle Eastern nation to abandon what Washington and allies say is a plan to develop nuclear weapons. China has so far rebuffed the overtures, arguing there should be no link between trade with Iran and its nuclear program.
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