Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEnergy Resources
IN THE NEWS

Energy Resources

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 14, 2014 | By Corey Johnson and Tim Boersma
The European Union and the United States recognize that there are ways they could play constructive roles in resolving the Ukraine crisis. But some of the suggestions revolving around natural gas and oil being floated suggest a profound misunderstanding of the politics, economics and geography of energy in the region. The notion that Europe and Ukraine could somehow become independent of Russian energy resources is utterly unrealistic. Russia is a resource economy, a Saudi Arabia with lots of imperial baggage.
Advertisement
OPINION
December 19, 2001
Your Dec. 16 editorial, "Reality Test for Energy Plan," was on target, particularly in regard to the "flimflam" promise of opening up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. However, in order to overcome Republican opposition and enact the needed measures on intensified conservation and alternative energy resources, it might be worth supporting the opening of ANWR as part of a legislative package. It would only be appropriate to name it in honor of the man most responsible--the Ralph Nader National Oil Reserve.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
ETNA,  Ohio -- Mitt Romney highlighted his energy policy as he campaigned in this coal-producing state, pledging Friday to increase domestic production and get the continent on track to energy independence. “We're going to make sure, No. 1, we take full advantage of the energy resources in this  country -- our coal, our oil, our gas, our renewables. We're going to review our regulations as they relate to coal to make sure that burning coal is done in a clean way, but we're not going to kill the industry like you see the EPA doing under this administration,” Romney told more than 2,000 supporters at a mining equipment factory.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Conoco, Canadian Firms Offer Natural Gas Plan to Mexico: The groundbreaking proposal was made by Conoco Inc. and Calgary-based companies Nova Corp. and Noranda Inc.'s Canadian Hunter Exploration Ltd. to develop a natural gas field in northern Mexico. But the proposal, given to state-owned Petroleos Mexicanos several months ago, is still in "preliminary" stages of discussion and awaiting action by Mexico, Conoco spokeswoman Sondra Fowler said. The proposal calls for Conoco, a unit of DuPont Co.
OPINION
June 14, 2008
Re "Oil inflames U.S.-Saudi ties," June 8 Contrary to popular belief, Saudi Arabia and OPEC are not responsible for America's energy crisis. The vast increase in oil demand from China and India notwithstanding, far-left environmentalists, judicial activists and Democrat-dominated government are the obstructionists. Indeed, if it were not for the self-righteous delusionists and nature's la-la-landers preventing the development of domestic energy resources from protected areas (which few can even visit)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hans Landsberg, 88, economist who pioneered the collection of data on energy resources and costs, died Sunday in Washington, D.C., of complications of Parkinson's disease. A native of East Prussia who grew up in Berlin, Landsberg fled the Nazis in 1933 and earned a degree at the London School of Economics. After receiving a master's degree at Columbia University in New York, he served as an intelligence officer in Italy with the U.S. Office of Strategic Services.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
ETNA,  Ohio -- Mitt Romney highlighted his energy policy as he campaigned in this coal-producing state, pledging Friday to increase domestic production and get the continent on track to energy independence. “We're going to make sure, No. 1, we take full advantage of the energy resources in this  country -- our coal, our oil, our gas, our renewables. We're going to review our regulations as they relate to coal to make sure that burning coal is done in a clean way, but we're not going to kill the industry like you see the EPA doing under this administration,” Romney told more than 2,000 supporters at a mining equipment factory.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Mitt Romney will unveil an energy plan Thursday that he says will allow North America to be energy independent by 2020 and decrease costs to consumers by increasing domestic production. The plan, released to reporters Wednesday, includes approving the Keystone XL pipeline bringing oil from Canada to Texas - President Obama has put off a decision until after the election - and increasing domestic production to spur job growth. Romney outlined a handful of specifics to accomplish his goals, among them streamlining existing environmental laws and "aggressively" opening new offshore areas for drilling, starting with Virginia and the Carolinas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989
Bruce Barnbaum's column ("A New Endangered Species Blooms in Gorman: Beauty Itself," Op-Ed Page, March 15) opposing the proposed Gorman wind farm seemed to be a sincere and thoughtful discussion of the problem from one environmentalist's point of view. However, as a fellow environmentalist representing the wind energy industry, I must take issue with Barnbaum on a few points. First, his description of a wind farm as "concrete pads with . . . tall towers and noisy propellers" is "loaded" with words aimed at producing a negative reaction.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Maeve Reston
As a Wisconsin crowd chanted "Four more days," former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney offered the "closing argument" of his presidential campaign Friday, framing the choice in Tuesday's election as a vote for "more of the same" or "real change. " President Obama offered his own closer to audiences in Ohio, telling them the election offered a choice between "you're on your own" economics advocated by Romney and a continuation of Democratic policies that brought prosperity during the administration of President Clinton.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Mitt Romney will unveil an energy plan Thursday that he says will allow North America to be energy independent by 2020 and decrease costs to consumers by increasing domestic production. The plan, released to reporters Wednesday, includes approving the Keystone XL pipeline bringing oil from Canada to Texas - President Obama has put off a decision until after the election - and increasing domestic production to spur job growth. Romney outlined a handful of specifics to accomplish his goals, among them streamlining existing environmental laws and "aggressively" opening new offshore areas for drilling, starting with Virginia and the Carolinas.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
President Obama will open Alaska's national petroleum reserve to new drilling, as part of a broad plan aimed at blunting criticism that he is not doing enough to address rising energy prices. The plan, unveiled in Obama's weekly radio address Saturday, also would fast-track environmental assessment of petroleum exploration in some portions of the Atlantic and extend the leases of oil companies whose work in the Gulf of Mexico and the Arctic Ocean was interrupted by the drilling moratorium after last year's BP oil spill.
WORLD
July 10, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
For four long years, Reni Sualeha has lived in the shadow of a monster, a menacing chemical flow of fetid gray mud that belches unchecked from the bowels of the earth near her home. Known as the Lusi mud volcano, its spread is so relentless — burping noxious gas, swallowing communities, killing 14 people and forcing the evacuations of 60,000 — that some say it could star in its own sci-fi thriller. Those in the United States who are wondering just how long the ruptured oil well in the Gulf of Mexico could possibly keep gushing should listen to Sualeha's cautionary tale.
OPINION
June 14, 2008
Re "Oil inflames U.S.-Saudi ties," June 8 Contrary to popular belief, Saudi Arabia and OPEC are not responsible for America's energy crisis. The vast increase in oil demand from China and India notwithstanding, far-left environmentalists, judicial activists and Democrat-dominated government are the obstructionists. Indeed, if it were not for the self-righteous delusionists and nature's la-la-landers preventing the development of domestic energy resources from protected areas (which few can even visit)
WORLD
February 12, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Finance ministers from the Group of 8 industrialized nations, warning that "high and volatile energy prices" pose a threat to global economic growth, called Saturday for stepped-up efforts to ensure a stable worldwide energy supply. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin was host to the G-8 officials, who issued a communique calling for greater cooperation between oil-producing and -consuming nations and private industry.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
In North Dakota, a $100-million oil refinery is planned on the Three Affiliated Tribes reservation. In Washington state, the Tulalip Tribes are looking at building a plant that would produce electricity from cattle waste. And in Colorado, the Southern Ute tribe will pay each tribal elder $55,000 this year, largely from the money it makes from gas drilling. From the Northern Plains to the Pacific, tribes are increasingly getting into the energy business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2001
Re "When Life Gets Messy In A Model Home," April 7. Southern California is quickly turning into one massive suburban corridor, which will soon stretch from Bakersfield to San Diego. Writers like [Karima] Haynes could do far more to educate the public if they looked past the subjects of barbecues and lizards, and instead looked at how we Southern Californians are contributing to the demise of the very dream we hope to enjoy. Consider the breakneck pace of developer-driven construction in our few remaining desert / ranch areas north of Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
From his perch behind the wheel of a heavy-hauler truck 23 feet above ground, Lucas Crisby peers out over a seemingly limitless moonscape of black, sticky sand. Oil has been good to Crisby. With his $62,000 annual salary, he recently sold a starter home and purchased a $338,000, four-bedroom house a few doors from where he grew up. That's a significant achievement for a 20-year-old without a college degree and only a few years of work experience.
WORLD
December 4, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan -- The Cold War may be over, but U.S. and Russian soldiers are expanding outposts in this mountainous former Soviet republic about 3,200 miles east of NATO headquarters in Brussels and nearly 2,000 miles from Moscow. The U.S. opened its base three years ago as a launching pad for troops and cargo heading into Afghanistan. Two years later, with the Americans showing no signs of leaving, Russia opened its own base.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|