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NEWS
February 5, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it got too hot in Galina Borovitskaya's apartment the other day, she opened the door to the balcony to let in the frigid winter air--then forgot about it and went out shopping. When she got back, the 40-year-old housewife berated herself for the absent-mindedness that had killed some of her windowsill plants. But at least she had no need to worry about the effect on her heating bill. She pays 10 cents a month. And even if she took a monthlong hot shower, she would still only pay 10 cents.
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WORLD
December 22, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
The previously unknown firm that made the winning bid for beleaguered Yukos Oil Co.'s core production facility will probably make it available to the state-controlled Gazprom natural gas company, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin indicated Tuesday. Speaking at a news conference in Germany, Putin endorsed the forced auction.
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NEWS
February 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A weeks-long energy crisis that has left tens of thousands of Russians freezing in their homes claimed the first political scalps of President Vladimir V. Putin's year-old administration. Energy Minister Alexander Gavrin resigned after Putin signed an unusually blunt decree accusing him of a "chronic inability to solve the sector's problems."
BUSINESS
December 6, 2001 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prices for crude oil and gasoline on U.S. commodities markets initially were lifted Wednesday by Russia's announcement, but ultimately both closed lower on the day. And analysts said they don't foresee Russia's action causing a significant jump in prices over the next couple of months. That's because U.S. stockpiles of oil and gasoline continue to bulge, according to government and industry statistics released this week. The economic recession, together with the slump in travel after Sept.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing Russia a step nearer to the world economy, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday ordered domestic prices for oil and oil products nearly doubled. To protect his country's already exasperated consumers, Yeltsin unexpectedly incorporated a novel mechanism in his decree that will penalize refiners who try to gouge the public: Above a certain government-mandated level, higher prices for petroleum and its byproducts will now automatically trigger much higher taxes.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | Reuters
Russia more than doubled gas prices for industrial and household users Monday, raising the cost of living another notch for millions struggling to make ends meet. Gas producers say the higher prices are still only a tiny fraction of the average export price and are essential if they are to cover the increased costs of maintaining production and investing in development.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin flexed his expanding political muscle on Thursday by taking over control of his vast republic's government and nationalizing all energy facilities on Russian territory. With his decree making the Russian Council of Ministers subordinate to the presidency, Yeltsin put into law the broad powers conferred on him by the crumbling Soviet leadership since he defied a Communist coup attempt and spared the country another era of hard-line rule.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1994 | BETH KNOBEL
ISSUE: Russia, the world's largest energy exporter, is turning up the heat on countries that won't pay their power bills. Russia's cash-strapped neighbors in the Baltics and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) are the worst offenders: Ukraine owes Russia nearly $3.5 billion for energy, including $900 million for natural gas; Belarus owes $240 million and tiny Latvia owes $23 million for Russian natural gas.
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years after the world's worst nuclear accident halted atomic power development throughout the Soviet Union, Russia unveiled an ambitious but controversial plan Friday to ease its growing energy shortage by resuming construction of nuclear power reactors. The plan aims to nearly double Russia's output of nuclear energy, which now generates 5% of its electricity, by building 31 new reactors before the year 2010. It was signed without publicity Dec.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And you thought electricity deregulation in California was a rough game. The brash young reformer running Russia's powerful electricity monopoly was the target of an attempt by Soviet-era holdovers to oust him on Wednesday. He survived--but it was a boardroom clash for control some regard as a sign of this country's increasing economic stability and by others as evidence of its shakiness.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vladimir V. Putin has said that he wants to reform Russia's two biggest monopolies, the gas producer Gazprom and the electric power giant UES, both infamous for inefficiency and for allegedly enriching top management at the expense of shareholders and the public. But critics say recent signals by Putin's government indicate the opposite.
NEWS
February 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A weeks-long energy crisis that has left tens of thousands of Russians freezing in their homes claimed the first political scalps of President Vladimir V. Putin's year-old administration. Energy Minister Alexander Gavrin resigned after Putin signed an unusually blunt decree accusing him of a "chronic inability to solve the sector's problems."
BUSINESS
January 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And you thought electricity deregulation in California was a rough game. The brash young reformer running Russia's powerful electricity monopoly was the target of an attempt by Soviet-era holdovers to oust him on Wednesday. He survived--but it was a boardroom clash for control some regard as a sign of this country's increasing economic stability and by others as evidence of its shakiness.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1994 | BETH KNOBEL
ISSUE: Russia, the world's largest energy exporter, is turning up the heat on countries that won't pay their power bills. Russia's cash-strapped neighbors in the Baltics and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) are the worst offenders: Ukraine owes Russia nearly $3.5 billion for energy, including $900 million for natural gas; Belarus owes $240 million and tiny Latvia owes $23 million for Russian natural gas.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it got too hot in Galina Borovitskaya's apartment the other day, she opened the door to the balcony to let in the frigid winter air--then forgot about it and went out shopping. When she got back, the 40-year-old housewife berated herself for the absent-mindedness that had killed some of her windowsill plants. But at least she had no need to worry about the effect on her heating bill. She pays 10 cents a month. And even if she took a monthlong hot shower, she would still only pay 10 cents.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | Reuters
Russia more than doubled gas prices for industrial and household users Monday, raising the cost of living another notch for millions struggling to make ends meet. Gas producers say the higher prices are still only a tiny fraction of the average export price and are essential if they are to cover the increased costs of maintaining production and investing in development.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vladimir V. Putin has said that he wants to reform Russia's two biggest monopolies, the gas producer Gazprom and the electric power giant UES, both infamous for inefficiency and for allegedly enriching top management at the expense of shareholders and the public. But critics say recent signals by Putin's government indicate the opposite.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2001 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prices for crude oil and gasoline on U.S. commodities markets initially were lifted Wednesday by Russia's announcement, but ultimately both closed lower on the day. And analysts said they don't foresee Russia's action causing a significant jump in prices over the next couple of months. That's because U.S. stockpiles of oil and gasoline continue to bulge, according to government and industry statistics released this week. The economic recession, together with the slump in travel after Sept.
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years after the world's worst nuclear accident halted atomic power development throughout the Soviet Union, Russia unveiled an ambitious but controversial plan Friday to ease its growing energy shortage by resuming construction of nuclear power reactors. The plan aims to nearly double Russia's output of nuclear energy, which now generates 5% of its electricity, by building 31 new reactors before the year 2010. It was signed without publicity Dec.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing Russia a step nearer to the world economy, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday ordered domestic prices for oil and oil products nearly doubled. To protect his country's already exasperated consumers, Yeltsin unexpectedly incorporated a novel mechanism in his decree that will penalize refiners who try to gouge the public: Above a certain government-mandated level, higher prices for petroleum and its byproducts will now automatically trigger much higher taxes.
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