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Energy Shortages Yugoslavia

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NEWS
September 16, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milan Panic, the Orange County businessman who is now Yugoslavia's prime minister, expressed satisfaction Tuesday with results of a visit here despite his apparent failure to win any concrete promises of assistance from China. Speaking at a news conference in the Great Hall of the People, Panic said that in a meeting Monday with Chinese Premier Li Peng, he requested "humanitarian" oil shipments from China "for heating for our hospitals, for our children, for our homes."
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NEWS
April 12, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Czech beer and Italian handbags and luxurious foreign vacations are still readily available here at bargain-basement prices. While U.N. sanctions imposed 10 months ago have worsened the longstanding economic crisis for what remains of Yugoslavia, they have failed in their objective of breaking Yugoslav Serbs' support for Serbian rebellions in nearby countries by isolating and depriving the Serbs.
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NEWS
September 16, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milan Panic, the Southern California businessman who is now Yugoslavia's prime minister, expressed satisfaction Tuesday with results of a visit here despite his apparent failure to win any concrete promises of assistance from China. Speaking at a news conference in the Great Hall of the People, Panic said that in a meeting Monday with Chinese Premier Li Peng, he requested "humanitarian" oil shipments from China "for heating for our hospitals, for our children, for our homes."
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milan Panic, the Orange County businessman who is now Yugoslavia's prime minister, expressed satisfaction Tuesday with results of a visit here despite his apparent failure to win any concrete promises of assistance from China. Speaking at a news conference in the Great Hall of the People, Panic said that in a meeting Monday with Chinese Premier Li Peng, he requested "humanitarian" oil shipments from China "for heating for our hospitals, for our children, for our homes."
NEWS
April 12, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Czech beer and Italian handbags and luxurious foreign vacations are still readily available here at bargain-basement prices. While U.N. sanctions imposed 10 months ago have worsened the longstanding economic crisis for what remains of Yugoslavia, they have failed in their objective of breaking Yugoslav Serbs' support for Serbian rebellions in nearby countries by isolating and depriving the Serbs.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milan Panic, the Southern California businessman who is now Yugoslavia's prime minister, expressed satisfaction Tuesday with results of a visit here despite his apparent failure to win any concrete promises of assistance from China. Speaking at a news conference in the Great Hall of the People, Panic said that in a meeting Monday with Chinese Premier Li Peng, he requested "humanitarian" oil shipments from China "for heating for our hospitals, for our children, for our homes."
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