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BUSINESS
February 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Two former Enron Corp. traders accused of driving up energy prices during California's power crisis were each sentenced Wednesday to two years of court-supervised release. Timothy Belden, the former head of trading in Enron's Portland, Ore., office, was sentenced in federal court after pleading guilty in October 2002 to one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud. His plea was the first prosecution of anyone related to the West's energy crisis in 2000 and 2001.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 2006 | From Reuters
A federal jury in Houston found two former energy traders guilty of wire fraud in connection with the transmission of natural gas prices to industry newsletters but did not convict the pair on conspiracy and other false-reporting charges, the Justice Department said. Former Dynegy Inc. gas trader Michelle Valencia was convicted of seven counts of wire fraud. Former El Paso Corp. trader Greg Singelton was convicted of one count of wire fraud.
WORLD
July 28, 2006 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
As the Israeli military blockade of Lebanese ports enters its third week, officials here say they are running critically short of fuel for power plants. "All our power generation depends on fuel oil," Public Works and Transportation Minister Mohammed Safadi said Thursday. "We are five days away from running out."
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for the California attorney general's office and others mounted a last-ditch effort Thursday to alter a nearly $1.8-billion settlement with Sempra Energy over allegations that it conspired to restrict natural gassupplies and raise prices during the state's energy crisis. San Diego Superior Court Judge Ronald Prager had given the pact his blessing in a tentative ruling issued late Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. electricity supplies this summer will be tighter than last summer as demand for power has grown more quickly than new generation, and parts of California and Connecticut will be at risk of blackouts under extreme conditions, an industry group said Monday. Generating capacity in the U.S. and Canada will be 17% higher than overall peak demand, down from 17.5% during last year's peak, according to the North American Electric Reliability Council. Power supplies will have increased by 1.
WORLD
January 28, 2006 | From Associated Press
Suffering through its worst energy crisis in years, Georgia struck a deal with Iran for emergency natural gas supplies Friday. Dawn-to-dusk lines for kerosene and firewood persisted here in the capital for a second day, as desperate Georgians lined up for fuel to heat their homes amid the former Soviet republic's heaviest snowfall in years. "It's an energy blockade.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2006 | From Reuters
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday issued rules to prevent a repeat of the kind of massive market manipulation by Enron Corp. and others during the 2000-01 energy crisis that ravaged California and other Western states. The rules, which Congress authorized FERC to issue as part of a $14.5-billion energy bill passed last year, ban "any manipulative or deceptive device or contrivance" in the U.S. wholesale natural gas and electricity markets.
WORLD
January 1, 2006 | Doug Smith, Times Staff Writer
Much of Iraq ushered in the new year under a near blackout today as a week-old power crunch worsened across huge sections of the northern and central parts of the country. Baghdad's already sporadic electrical power supply was cut to about an hour Saturday, causing a legion of private generators to roar steadily and dampening the spirits of millions of Iraqis preparing for New Year's Eve, traditionally a joyous time of fireworks, family gatherings and public outings.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2005 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The bankruptcy filing by the state's largest independent electricity generator, Calpine Corp., could lead to higher monthly bills for many ratepayers but is unlikely to result in blackouts next summer, energy regulators and analysts said Wednesday.
WORLD
December 7, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Widespread power failures blacked out much of President Robert Mugabe's state of the nation address in which he promised to address Zimbabwe's chronic electricity shortages. Downtown Harare lost power minutes before state-run radio and television were scheduled to broadcast Mugabe's speech. The television station ran cartoons until power was restored about half an hour into the speech.
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