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NEWS
June 9, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea does not have an energy crisis, insists the Korea Electric Power Corp., or KEPCO. Nevertheless, employees at the company--which supplies electricity nationwide to what is now the world's 12th-largest economy--are bracing themselves for another summer without air conditioning in their own headquarters. Last year, the government-run company set a policy of keeping the temperature in its offices at 79 degrees during the summer.
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NEWS
June 9, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea does not have an energy crisis, insists the Korea Electric Power Corp., or KEPCO. Nevertheless, employees at the company--which supplies electricity nationwide to what is now the world's 12th-largest economy--are bracing themselves for another summer without air conditioning in their own headquarters. Last year, the government-run company set a policy of keeping the temperature in its offices at 79 degrees during the summer.
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WORLD
July 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
United Nations inspectors have verified that North Korea has shut down its nuclear reactor, the chief of the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency said. "Our inspectors are there. They verified the shutting down of the reactor yesterday," said Mohamed ElBaradei, chief of the International Atomic Energy Agency. South Korea sent more oil to the North today to reward its compliance with an agreement to stop making nuclear weapons.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon, Mitsubishi to Study Pipeline: The largest U.S. oil company said it will join with Japan's Mitsubishi Corp. and a Chinese firm to study the possibility of building the world's longest natural gas pipeline. The group will examine whether a pipeline can be built from the gas-rich republics in central Asia, such as Turkmenistan, across some of the most rugged terrain in the world to China and eventually to energy-starved South Korea and Japan.
WORLD
May 18, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL - Perhaps it is merely basic human desire to keep up with the neighbors, but an increasing number of South Koreans are saying that they want nuclear weapons too. Even in Japan, a country still traumatized by the legacy of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there is a debate about the once-taboo topic of nuclear weapons. The mere fact that the bomb is being discussed as a policy option shows how North Korea's nuclear program could trigger a new arms race in East Asia, unraveling decades of nonproliferation efforts.
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