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NEWS
December 20, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His country jilted in recent days by two powerful blocs of nations, Turkish Prime Minister Mesut Yilmaz on Friday ended a whirlwind visit here with assurances of stronger U.S. ties. After a day of hectic diplomacy in which Yilmaz met President Clinton, Vice President Al Gore and four Cabinet members, senior U.S. officials said Washington and Ankara had agreed to strengthen relations in various areas, including trade and regional cooperation. The agreement includes high-level visits by U.S.
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NEWS
December 20, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His country jilted in recent days by two powerful blocs of nations, Turkish Prime Minister Mesut Yilmaz on Friday ended a whirlwind visit here with assurances of stronger U.S. ties. After a day of hectic diplomacy in which Yilmaz met President Clinton, Vice President Al Gore and four Cabinet members, senior U.S. officials said Washington and Ankara had agreed to strengthen relations in various areas, including trade and regional cooperation. The agreement includes high-level visits by U.S.
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NEWS
July 27, 1997 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sending political signals to both Turkey and Iran, the White House has decided not to oppose construction of a $1.6-billion pipeline that would carry natural gas from Central Asia through Iran to Turkey, Clinton administration officials said Saturday, even though the project could be deemed a violation of U.S. economic sanctions against Tehran.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sending political signals to both Turkey and Iran, the White House has decided not to oppose construction of a $1.6-billion pipeline that would carry natural gas from Central Asia through Iran to Turkey, Clinton administration officials said Saturday, even though the project could be deemed a violation of U.S. economic sanctions against Tehran.
WORLD
December 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
President Vladimir V. Putin made the first official visit by a Russian leader to Turkey, hoping to strengthen an economic relationship that is turning the former foes into robust trading partners. His two-day visit will include a business forum and is expected to produce cooperation agreements on defense, finance and energy. Turkey and Russia have a history of animosity.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1997
Unocal Corp. said it signed a letter of intent with Istanbul-based Koc Holdings to create Turkey's first private distributor and marketer of natural gas. El Segundo-based Unocal said the new company will buy, sell and transport natural gas to customers in Turkey. It would also evaluate whether to build a pipeline to accommodate the privatization of Turkey's energy industry. Turkey, which produces 2.8% of its natural gas consumption, expects natural gas demand to triple by 2010.
SPORTS
September 21, 1998
Ram players held two players-only meetings recently to air grievances about Coach Dick Vermeil's grueling practices. Linebacker Mike Jones said that the long practices every day are one reason the Rams trailed, 14-0, after the first quarter of both of their first two games. So Vermeil listened to the players and gave in to some of their demands. Beginning last Wednesday, he made the following adjustments to practice: * Players could report at 9 a.m., rather than 8.
OPINION
December 16, 2004 | Elif Shafak, Elif Shafak, a professor of Near Eastern studies at the University of Arizona, is of Turkish descent. Her first novel in English, "The Saint of Incipient Insanities," was just published by Farrar, Straus, Giroux.
"You be the Turk and I'll be Storm Trooper X-G," shrieked my friend's 13-year-old son, Sinan, just as I was bringing in another tray full of food to the room where he and his buddy had been camped out since early morning. "You take the cannonball, I'll get the Galaxy Gun." "I want the Galaxy Gun too," objected Reinaldo, his skinny friend with the very long reddish hair. "The Turk wants technology too!" Mesmerized, I froze in the doorway.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four-year-old Maysik Shakhbazian was lying in bed with his grandmother one night and looking up at the bright full moon. As usual, there was no heat or light in the Yerevan apartment where he lives. "See how pretty the moon is," his grandmother said. Suddenly, Maysik had an inspiration. "Grandmother," he asked, "isn't there some way we could lay an electricity line to it?" Maysik was not just fantasizing.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Azerbaijan and a Western-led group of oil companies agreed Monday to export some of their Caspian Sea oil through Georgia, breaking Russia's near-monopoly on the flow of energy from one of the world's most-promising reserves. The decision was a milestone in the Clinton Administration's campaign to diminish Moscow's influence over the former Soviet states in the Caspian Basin, which energy specialists expect to become the leading oil and gas producer after the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly everyone in Istanbul, one of the world's fastest-growing and most unruly cities, will tell you that Recep Tayyip Erdogan is doing a better job of managing the chaos than they ever thought possible. Thanks to the 44-year-old mayor, they say, the city is cleaner and greener. Garbage is picked up regularly, trees are being planted, and hard coal has replaced the lignite that once fueled a choking smog. New dams and pipes channel more water to people's homes.
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