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NEWS
January 16, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin swept away a major obstacle to strategic disarmament, announcing Friday that Russia has agreed to place Ukraine under the protection of its atomic umbrella. "Russia guarantees it will maintain and safeguard Ukraine's integrity and protect its borders from a possible nuclear attack," Yeltsin said.
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NEWS
February 14, 1996 | From Reuters
This nation of 52 million people went on emergency footing Tuesday, shutting down factories throughout the country to cope with energy shortages after Russia uncoupled it from a joint power grid. Engineers scrambled to keep vital industries open by redistributing power supplies, already hit by unusually cold weather and a 2-week-old strike by coal miners. Rotating power cuts kept homes unlighted for hours at a time.
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NEWS
November 21, 1992 | CHRYSTYNA LAPYCHAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A severe fuel shortage has crippled the provision of basic goods and services throughout Ukraine as the government of this fledgling country grapples with erratic deliveries of oil from its neighbor and sole supplier, Russia. About 40,000 Kiev residents could not buy bread earlier this week after the city's transport service failed to deliver 11 1/2 tons of bread to stores because of the fuel shortage.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ukraine's Parliament, more worried about energy shortages than environmental safety, voted Thursday to keep the infamous Chernobyl nuclear power plant working and to resume the country's stalled atomic energy program. The Soviet-built Chernobyl plant, which spewed radiation across Europe after a 1986 explosion and fire, was to have shut down by the end of this year.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | From Reuters
This nation of 52 million people went on emergency footing Tuesday, shutting down factories throughout the country to cope with energy shortages after Russia uncoupled it from a joint power grid. Engineers scrambled to keep vital industries open by redistributing power supplies, already hit by unusually cold weather and a 2-week-old strike by coal miners. Rotating power cuts kept homes unlighted for hours at a time.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ukraine's Parliament, more worried about energy shortages than environmental safety, voted Thursday to keep the infamous Chernobyl nuclear power plant working and to resume the country's stalled atomic energy program. The Soviet-built Chernobyl plant, which spewed radiation across Europe after a 1986 explosion and fire, was to have shut down by the end of this year.
NEWS
June 27, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ukrainians voted in large numbers Sunday in a presidential election that boiled down to a referendum on whether post-Soviet Europe's most disastrous peacetime economy should remain at arm's length from its former masters in Moscow. Pre-election polls indicated that President Leonid Kravchuk, who led Ukraine to independence 2 1/2 years ago, is ahead in the seven-man field but will get fewer than half the votes.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1994 | BETH KNOBEL
ISSUE: Russia, the world's largest energy exporter, is turning up the heat on countries that won't pay their power bills. Russia's cash-strapped neighbors in the Baltics and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) are the worst offenders: Ukraine owes Russia nearly $3.5 billion for energy, including $900 million for natural gas; Belarus owes $240 million and tiny Latvia owes $23 million for Russian natural gas.
WORLD
November 25, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Over the last five years, Russia has watched as its once-powerful hold over Eastern Europe and Central Asia gave way to bewitching new alliances with the West. Government leaders in Serbia and Georgia stopped calling the Kremlin for advice and turned increasingly to Washington. Much of Eastern Europe, including the three former Soviet republics in the Baltics, joined NATO. Russia grumbled, but acquiesced. But these nations were not Ukraine.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | DAVE CARPENTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The ghosts of history's worst nuclear accident lurk everywhere in the pine forests and overgrown farmland that surround Chernobyl. Dozens of evacuated villages lie frozen in panic, house doors flung open. Vast fields serve as open graves for endless rows of radioactive trucks, tanks and helicopters used in the deadly cleanup 10 years ago.
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin swept away a major obstacle to strategic disarmament, announcing Friday that Russia has agreed to place Ukraine under the protection of its atomic umbrella. "Russia guarantees it will maintain and safeguard Ukraine's integrity and protect its borders from a possible nuclear attack," Yeltsin said.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | CHRYSTYNA LAPYCHAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A severe fuel shortage has crippled the provision of basic goods and services throughout Ukraine as the government of this fledgling country grapples with erratic deliveries of oil from its neighbor and sole supplier, Russia. About 40,000 Kiev residents could not buy bread earlier this week after the city's transport service failed to deliver 11 1/2 tons of bread to stores because of the fuel shortage.
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