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NEWS
June 12, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
In the flat scrublands of western Utah, the mighty city of Los Angeles--which already draws water 300 miles from the High Sierra--has begun to collect the bounty of its latest foray into the distant West in search of natural resources. This time the prize is not plentiful water. It is electric power, enough to light a third of the city's homes, produced without adding any smog in the Los Angeles Basin.
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NEWS
June 12, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
In the flat scrublands of western Utah, the mighty city of Los Angeles--which already draws water 300 miles from the High Sierra--has begun to collect the bounty of its latest foray into the distant West in search of natural resources. This time the prize is not plentiful water. It is electric power, enough to light a third of the city's homes, produced without adding any smog in the Los Angeles Basin.
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NEWS
October 16, 1988 | DAVE JOHNSON
--A happy, squirming Jessica McClure unveiled a bronze plaque in Midland, Tex., that commemorates her dramatic rescue one year ago from an abandoned well where she had been stuck for 58 hours. About 150 people crowded in to see artist Mary Griffith's 4-by-6-foot bas relief at a community center. The work depicts Baby Jessica, now 2 1/2, and the smiling, dusty faces of rescue workers at the moment she was pulled from the well.
SPORTS
January 19, 2008 | Jonathan Abrams, Times Staff Writer
SALT LAKE CITY -- So much for the momentum push. It pushed back. Hard. The Clippers followed arguably their best win of the season with arguably one of their worst losses, a 106-88 thrashing from the Utah Jazz on Friday at EnergySolutions Arena. The uninspiring game ended the way so many between these teams have before here, with the Jazz celebrating a victory and confetti lightly streaming from the rafters, and the Clippers losing and searching for warmer weather.
SPORTS
February 5, 2000 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's panic time! The slump is worsening. The tension is overwhelming. It's bad, bad, bad and it's obvious that desperate measures are necessary. But enough about John Stockton, Karl Malone and the Utah Jazz, who on Friday showed the Lakers a thing or two about lackluster energy, fruitless basketball and troubled expressions.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2005 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court in Denver has dismissed, on technical grounds, an appeal filed by environmental groups challenging the legality of a settlement between Utah and the U.S. Interior Department that nullified wilderness protection for millions of acres and limited the ability of the Interior Department to protect other areas in the future. The ruling means that the case will go back to the same federal district court judge who approved the settlement.
SPORTS
August 27, 2002 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were times during the regular season that Tamecka Dixon looked as if she wanted to be anywhere but on a basketball court. There were spasms of turnovers and bad shots. She was a non-factor in late-season losses to Seattle and Houston. Coach Michael Cooper put her on the WNBA Western Conference All-Star team, but her scoring average, 10.6, had taken a dip from the 11.7 points she'd averaged in 2001. More telling was the shooting percentage, down to .391 from .417.
NEWS
November 9, 2004 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
After the election, photographers and hunters can still bait Alaskan black bears with sweets and grease, loggers can chop two Oregon forests, Coloradans will get more power from renewable energy and Utah voters won't gain more open space. In a national election won by conservatives, the results show that traditional powers in the West -- sportsmen, extractive industries and sagebrush rebels -- continue to wield clout at the ballot box, though environmentalists moved some of their agenda forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
The recent fight over electric rates in Los Angeles exacted a political toll on Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and executives with the Department of Water and Power, eroding their influence in the wake of their feud with the City Council. Although both sides have taken steps to make amends, the dispute could have a lasting effect on one of the mayor's original 2005 campaign promises: securing at least 20% of the city's electricity from renewable fuel sources by Dec. 31. Despite his demand for an immediate rate hike, Villaraigosa had to settle for one that is both smaller and takes effect three months later than he wanted.
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