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Enfish Technology

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BUSINESS
October 4, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enfish Technology co-founder and Chief Executive Louise J. Wannier is an accidental entrepreneur. As an astronomy student at Caltech in the 1970s, she seemed headed toward a scientific career. But a summer spent probing the isotope variation of the element samarium ended that. She obtained an MBA from UCLA and went on to Ernst & Young, where she worked as a consultant for six years.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enfish Technology co-founder and Chief Executive Louise J. Wannier is an accidental entrepreneur. As an astronomy student at Caltech in the 1970s, she seemed headed toward a scientific career. But a summer spent probing the isotope variation of the element samarium ended that. She obtained an MBA from UCLA and went on to Ernst & Young, where she worked as a consultant for six years.
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BUSINESS
October 11, 2000 | A Times Staff Writer
The annual awards luncheon for Women at Work, a nonprofit career resource center, is scheduled for Oct. 19 at the Doubletree Hotel in Pasadena. Keynote speaker Louise Wannier, Enfish Technology chief executive, will talk about "humanizing" technology. For further details, go to http://www.womenatwork1.org.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1999 | DEBORA VRANA, Investment Banking Reporter
Enfish in the Chips: Pasadena software maker Enfish Technology is expected to announce today that it has received an $8-million venture capital investment from a group that includes tech giant Intel Corp. Other investors are Black Diamond Ventures, a new Los Angeles venture capital fund, and New York-based firm Spencer Trask. The investment, the company's second round of capital raising, will help it develop software designed to make information on computers easier to use.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, larry.magid@latimes.com
Like you, I get a lot of e-mail. Much of it is junk mail, but some contains important messages from readers, colleagues and companies I write about. I glance at all my incoming mail, but sometimes a message arrives that I want to deal with later. So I just leave it in my in-box and go about my business. Trouble is, when I look for that message a few days later, it's like looking for a needle in a haystack. It's lost among all the other messages I received.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to building high-tech companies, Southern California firms can find most of the necessary ingredients. Creativity abounds in the region known for spawning Mickey Mouse and the Mars rover. Entrepreneurs stand ready to play the risky game of turning ideas into companies. Even venture capital is more readily available for start-ups. Still, one key ingredient is missing: workers. Southland universities can't turn out engineers and software designers fast enough to keep up with demand.
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