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March 11, 2013 | By Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Time. It's a topic that doesn't much affect Roger Federer. The owner of 17 major titles and the defending champion of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells never wastes time. He certainly didn't on Monday, taking only 61 minutes to defeat Ivan Dodig of Croatia, 6-3, 6-1, in the third round at Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Federer doesn't fiddle with his clothing or walk in dizzying circles after a tense point. Whether he hits a swift winning shot after a short rally or mishits a losing shot after running and running during a long point, Federer just moves ahead.
August 30, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Michele Wein Layne decided on a career change 17 years ago when she was at her office at 10 p.m. poring over a mind-numbing legal document. Layne was an up-and-coming corporate litigation lawyer at a big Los Angeles law firm. But the grueling hours and unrewarding work left her miserable. She wanted something more meaningful, and soon after joined the Securities and Exchange Commission's local office as a lawyer fighting investment fraud and insider trading. After a series of promotions, she was chosen last month to lead the 150-person office.
November 11, 1995
This ordinance simply deals with what's already in place. We have home-based occupations. What we need to do is regulate and control them. In the long run, there are many benefits. First, it legalizes what is already being done. It generates money for the city that will help with the tax base. It provides for better licensing control and regulation because we will now have a clear definition of who can and who cannot operate in residences. And, of course, it allows people to operate legally the kind of businesses that should be conducted from home, which by the way are often constitutionally protected--a writer for example.
June 8, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Andrew Blankstein and Marisa Gerber
The gunman accused of killing four people in a Santa Monica shooting rampage Friday was apparently angry over his parents' divorce and had some mental health issues in the past, a law enforcement source told The Times. The suspect was identified by five law enforcement sources in Washington and Los Angeles as John Zawahri, in his 20s. Other sources with knowledge of the investigation said detectives believe the shooting was sparked by a family dispute of some kind but emphasized that the investigation was still in its early stages.
April 17, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano and Ken Dilanian
Two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing have been singled out in surveillance videos of the scene, sources told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday. U.S. counter-terrorism and law enforcement officials told The Times that the suspects in the Boston bombings were seen in a department store video that caught images of a man leaving a backpack near the finish line. A second federal official said he has been briefed that authorities believe a second video or photo showed "two men with two backpacks.
April 23, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Melanie Mason and Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
BOSTON - Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told investigators that he and his older brother planned the Boston Marathon bombings only a week or so before the race, that they were operating alone, and that they received no training or support from outside terrorist groups, officials said Tuesday. His comments appear to support investigators' theory that the attack was hastily conceived by two siblings who were self-radicalized. Writing answers from his hospital bed because he was shot in the throat, the 19-year-old accused bomber also said that his slain older brother, Tamerlan, was "upset" by the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and that anger was the motivation to plant two crude homemade bombs along the crowded race route.
February 3, 1990
The last thing we need is more "dog parks." Because of irresponsible dog owners and virtually non-existent law enforcement, everywhere they go becomes "dog toilets." The rest of us are sick of it and them! SUSU LEVY Encino
September 22, 1993
On behalf of California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, I would like to respond to the Aug. 28 letter from Molly Joel Coye, director of the Department of Health Services, regarding our 1992 report card on nursing homes. Our report did not link the number of deficiencies issued against facilities with inadequate enforcement. In fact, the report card specifically criticized three areas of enforcement: the collection of fines, failure to respond to complaints and inconsistency in enforcement.
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