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NATIONAL
May 17, 2012 | Bloomberg News
A New York federal judge temporarily blocked enforcement of a provision in the National Defense Authorization Act that opponents contend could subject them to indefinite military detention for political activism, news reporting or other 1st Amendment activities. U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest in Manhattan ruled Wednesday in favor of a group of writers and activists who sued President Obama, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and the Defense Department. Obama signed the bill into law Dec. 31. The complaint was filed Jan. 13 by a group including former New York Times reporter Christopher Hedges.
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SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | By Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Time. It's a topic that doesn't much affect Roger Federer. The owner of 17 major titles and the defending champion of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells never wastes time. He certainly didn't on Monday, taking only 61 minutes to defeat Ivan Dodig of Croatia, 6-3, 6-1, in the third round at Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Federer doesn't fiddle with his clothing or walk in dizzying circles after a tense point. Whether he hits a swift winning shot after a short rally or mishits a losing shot after running and running during a long point, Federer just moves ahead.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Michele Wein Layne decided on a career change 17 years ago when she was at her office at 10 p.m. poring over a mind-numbing legal document. Layne was an up-and-coming corporate litigation lawyer at a big Los Angeles law firm. But the grueling hours and unrewarding work left her miserable. She wanted something more meaningful, and soon after joined the Securities and Exchange Commission's local office as a lawyer fighting investment fraud and insider trading. After a series of promotions, she was chosen last month to lead the 150-person office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1995
This ordinance simply deals with what's already in place. We have home-based occupations. What we need to do is regulate and control them. In the long run, there are many benefits. First, it legalizes what is already being done. It generates money for the city that will help with the tax base. It provides for better licensing control and regulation because we will now have a clear definition of who can and who cannot operate in residences. And, of course, it allows people to operate legally the kind of businesses that should be conducted from home, which by the way are often constitutionally protected--a writer for example.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano and Brian Bennett
Investigators believe at least one of the two bombs in Boston was made with a pressure cooker, according to law enforcement and intelligence officials.  Rich DesLauriers, FBI special agent in charge in Boston, said at an afternoon news conference that investigators found pieces of black nylon from two backpacks and possible pressure cooker metal fragments. He said all were being sent to the FBI laboratory in Quantico, Va.   A federal law enforcement official who asked not be named because he was not authorized to speak publicly said evidence recovered at the scene of the marathon explosion suggests the ingredients for one of the two bombs was hidden in a metal pressure cooker stuffed inside a backpack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990
The last thing we need is more "dog parks." Because of irresponsible dog owners and virtually non-existent law enforcement, everywhere they go becomes "dog toilets." The rest of us are sick of it and them! SUSU LEVY Encino
NATIONAL
April 17, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal
BOSTON -- No one has been arrested in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings, local police and federal authorities said Wednesday after a spate of media reports indicated that someone was in custody and headed to court. As several hundred bystanders, reporters, police and U.S. marshals gathered outside Boston's federal courthouse in anticipation of an arrest, law enforcement officials began escorting people from the building. "We are evacuating the building," members of the Boston Police Department told the crowd outside the John Joseph Moakley Federal Courthouse, shortly after 3 p.m. There was no immediate word of why they took the action.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano and Ken Dilanian
Two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing have been singled out in surveillance videos of the scene, sources told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday. U.S. counter-terrorism and law enforcement officials told The Times that the suspects in the Boston bombings were seen in a department store video that caught images of a man leaving a backpack near the finish line. A second federal official said he has been briefed that authorities believe a second video or photo showed "two men with two backpacks.
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