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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
- Glenn McGovern joined the Air Force fresh out of high school and was plunged into a world of threats and intrigue. Assigned to protect U.S. bases worldwide, he studied the tactics of Germany's Red Army Faction, the attack style favored by Hezbollah and the IRA's pattern of bombings. He became enamored of the "Art of War," an ancient Chinese military treatise that counsels to know thyself, know thy enemy . But it was after a civilian policing career, when McGovern joined the Santa Clara County district attorney's office as an investigator, that he found his passion - one that would turn him into an expert on attacks against law enforcement.
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SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | By Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Time. It's a topic that doesn't much affect Roger Federer. The owner of 17 major titles and the defending champion of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells never wastes time. He certainly didn't on Monday, taking only 61 minutes to defeat Ivan Dodig of Croatia, 6-3, 6-1, in the third round at Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Federer doesn't fiddle with his clothing or walk in dizzying circles after a tense point. Whether he hits a swift winning shot after a short rally or mishits a losing shot after running and running during a long point, Federer just moves ahead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1995
This ordinance simply deals with what's already in place. We have home-based occupations. What we need to do is regulate and control them. In the long run, there are many benefits. First, it legalizes what is already being done. It generates money for the city that will help with the tax base. It provides for better licensing control and regulation because we will now have a clear definition of who can and who cannot operate in residences. And, of course, it allows people to operate legally the kind of businesses that should be conducted from home, which by the way are often constitutionally protected--a writer for example.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Melanie Mason and Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
BOSTON - Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told investigators that he and his older brother planned the Boston Marathon bombings only a week or so before the race, that they were operating alone, and that they received no training or support from outside terrorist groups, officials said Tuesday. His comments appear to support investigators' theory that the attack was hastily conceived by two siblings who were self-radicalized. Writing answers from his hospital bed because he was shot in the throat, the 19-year-old accused bomber also said that his slain older brother, Tamerlan, was "upset" by the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and that anger was the motivation to plant two crude homemade bombs along the crowded race route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Andrew Blankstein and Marisa Gerber
The gunman accused of killing four people in a Santa Monica shooting rampage Friday was apparently angry over his parents' divorce and had some mental health issues in the past, a law enforcement source told The Times. The suspect was identified by five law enforcement sources in Washington and Los Angeles as John Zawahri, in his 20s. Other sources with knowledge of the investigation said detectives believe the shooting was sparked by a family dispute of some kind but emphasized that the investigation was still in its early stages.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
In movies and television shows, undercover cops running prostitution stings bring out the handcuffs as soon as there's an agreement to exchange money for a sex act. They don't usually wait to receive the service. But police in Hawaii have said they need the flexibility to have sex with prostitutes and have fought to save a state law that has allowed them to do so. Civil rights groups and victims' advocates called that position ridiculous. “We are near certain that no other state in the nation allows for this type of 'interpersonal' and highly problematic 'investigative tool' to facilitate prostitution arrests,”  the Pacific Alliance to Stop Slavery wrote to lawmakers this week ahead of a Senate committee hearing regarding the law Friday.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Kim Murphy and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The FBI has found female DNA on at least one of the two homemade bombs detonated during the Boston Marathon on April 15, complicating the task of identifying how and where the deadly devices were constructed. The presence of genetic material does not necessarily mean a woman helped build the pressure-cooker bombs that killed three people and injured more than 260 others, said a law enforcement official, who discussed the discovery on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Ken Dilanian and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The Tsarnaev brothers were armed with at least three firearms and several improvised bombs - including a pressure-cooker explosive - during confrontations with police, an arsenal that will be traced to determine whether someone outside the U.S. helped the Boston bombing suspects obtain and build the weaponry, a law enforcement official said Saturday. Meanwhile, some investigators said the Boston Marathon bombing did not appear to have been orchestrated by Al Qaeda, several U.S. officials said Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990
The last thing we need is more "dog parks." Because of irresponsible dog owners and virtually non-existent law enforcement, everywhere they go becomes "dog toilets." The rest of us are sick of it and them! SUSU LEVY Encino
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