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BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Michele Wein Layne decided on a career change 17 years ago when she was at her office at 10 p.m. poring over a mind-numbing legal document. Layne was an up-and-coming corporate litigation lawyer at a big Los Angeles law firm. But the grueling hours and unrewarding work left her miserable. She wanted something more meaningful, and soon after joined the Securities and Exchange Commission's local office as a lawyer fighting investment fraud and insider trading. After a series of promotions, she was chosen last month to lead the 150-person office.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
- Glenn McGovern joined the Air Force fresh out of high school and was plunged into a world of threats and intrigue. Assigned to protect U.S. bases worldwide, he studied the tactics of Germany's Red Army Faction, the attack style favored by Hezbollah and the IRA's pattern of bombings. He became enamored of the "Art of War," an ancient Chinese military treatise that counsels to know thyself, know thy enemy . But it was after a civilian policing career, when McGovern joined the Santa Clara County district attorney's office as an investigator, that he found his passion - one that would turn him into an expert on attacks against law enforcement.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2012 | Bloomberg News
A New York federal judge temporarily blocked enforcement of a provision in the National Defense Authorization Act that opponents contend could subject them to indefinite military detention for political activism, news reporting or other 1st Amendment activities. U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest in Manhattan ruled Wednesday in favor of a group of writers and activists who sued President Obama, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and the Defense Department. Obama signed the bill into law Dec. 31. The complaint was filed Jan. 13 by a group including former New York Times reporter Christopher Hedges.
SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | By Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Time. It's a topic that doesn't much affect Roger Federer. The owner of 17 major titles and the defending champion of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells never wastes time. He certainly didn't on Monday, taking only 61 minutes to defeat Ivan Dodig of Croatia, 6-3, 6-1, in the third round at Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Federer doesn't fiddle with his clothing or walk in dizzying circles after a tense point. Whether he hits a swift winning shot after a short rally or mishits a losing shot after running and running during a long point, Federer just moves ahead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1995
This ordinance simply deals with what's already in place. We have home-based occupations. What we need to do is regulate and control them. In the long run, there are many benefits. First, it legalizes what is already being done. It generates money for the city that will help with the tax base. It provides for better licensing control and regulation because we will now have a clear definition of who can and who cannot operate in residences. And, of course, it allows people to operate legally the kind of businesses that should be conducted from home, which by the way are often constitutionally protected--a writer for example.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | By Lee Romney
OAKLAND - This city's beleaguered Police Department entered 2013 in full defensive mode. The crime rate had soared. Staffing was off sharply. And memories of the heavy-handed police response to Occupy protests 14 months earlier - and the lawsuits it generated - remained fresh. Scrambling for a turnaround, elected leaders hired out-of-state consultants to overhaul policing strategy and launched the first new police academies in years to beef up the force. The federal judge overseeing a settlement agreement over racial profiling and the beating and framing of suspects named a compliance director, giving him near-total control over the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2013 | By Jason Song
Joey Bebolla spread his wares on the sidewalk of Beach Street in Watts: some plastic aquarium plants, a few used tape players, an ancient BlackBerry. A woman walks by and picks up an old toy cash register, which Bebolla had cleaned up after finding it in the trash. "Give me $2," he said. "Fine, give me $1. " The woman passed on the quick discount, and put the item down. "Selling used to be embarrassing, at first," Bebolla said. "But I had to do it to survive, and now I'm used to it. " Hawking fruit at freeway offramps or old clothing on driveways and lawns is a Los Angeles tradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
After stepping down as Los Angeles County sheriff in January, Lee Baca largely has avoided the spotlight. Former aides don't know how to reach him. Reporters looking to interview him have been rebuffed. His last tweet was a link to his farewell address. But this week, Baca took center stage once again - this time as a guest speaker at a Loyola Marymount lecture hall where he offered a contemplative, and at times, self-critical view of his 15-year tenure. Speaking to a group of undergraduates Tuesday night, Baca said his biggest regret as sheriff was spending too much of his time at public events instead of managing his department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990
The last thing we need is more "dog parks." Because of irresponsible dog owners and virtually non-existent law enforcement, everywhere they go becomes "dog toilets." The rest of us are sick of it and them! SUSU LEVY Encino
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