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Enforcement

NATIONAL
May 17, 2012 | Bloomberg News
A New York federal judge temporarily blocked enforcement of a provision in the National Defense Authorization Act that opponents contend could subject them to indefinite military detention for political activism, news reporting or other 1st Amendment activities. U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest in Manhattan ruled Wednesday in favor of a group of writers and activists who sued President Obama, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and the Defense Department. Obama signed the bill into law Dec. 31. The complaint was filed Jan. 13 by a group including former New York Times reporter Christopher Hedges.
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SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | By Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Time. It's a topic that doesn't much affect Roger Federer. The owner of 17 major titles and the defending champion of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells never wastes time. He certainly didn't on Monday, taking only 61 minutes to defeat Ivan Dodig of Croatia, 6-3, 6-1, in the third round at Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Federer doesn't fiddle with his clothing or walk in dizzying circles after a tense point. Whether he hits a swift winning shot after a short rally or mishits a losing shot after running and running during a long point, Federer just moves ahead.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
In movies and television shows, undercover cops running prostitution stings bring out the handcuffs as soon as there's an agreement to exchange money for a sex act. They don't usually wait to receive the service. But police in Hawaii have said they need the flexibility to have sex with prostitutes and have fought to save a state law that has allowed them to do so. Civil rights groups and victims' advocates called that position ridiculous. “We are near certain that no other state in the nation allows for this type of 'interpersonal' and highly problematic 'investigative tool' to facilitate prostitution arrests,”  the Pacific Alliance to Stop Slavery wrote to lawmakers this week ahead of a Senate committee hearing regarding the law Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1995
This ordinance simply deals with what's already in place. We have home-based occupations. What we need to do is regulate and control them. In the long run, there are many benefits. First, it legalizes what is already being done. It generates money for the city that will help with the tax base. It provides for better licensing control and regulation because we will now have a clear definition of who can and who cannot operate in residences. And, of course, it allows people to operate legally the kind of businesses that should be conducted from home, which by the way are often constitutionally protected--a writer for example.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California's labor commissioner has sued real estate brokerage ZipRealty Inc. for nearly $18 million, including back pay, in her department's largest minimum-wage enforcement action. The complaint, filed Monday in Alameda County Superior Court, accused the Emeryville, Calif., firm of failing to pay minimum wages and overtime to hundreds of agents throughout the state. ZipRealty markets homes statewide and nationally through the Internet but relies on employee agents to respond to online queries and shepherd deals to closing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - The family of BART Det. Sgt. Tommy Smith, who was accidentally shot and killed by a fellow officer during a probation search Tuesday, expressed compassion for the shooter and his family in an interview with a local television station. Smith, a 23-year veteran of the Bay Area Rapid Transit force who led the detective unit, was killed accidentally by a partner during what was to be a routine search of the Dublin, Calif., apartment of a robbery suspect already in custody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Andrew Blankstein and Marisa Gerber
The gunman accused of killing four people in a Santa Monica shooting rampage Friday was apparently angry over his parents' divorce and had some mental health issues in the past, a law enforcement source told The Times. The suspect was identified by five law enforcement sources in Washington and Los Angeles as John Zawahri, in his 20s. Other sources with knowledge of the investigation said detectives believe the shooting was sparked by a family dispute of some kind but emphasized that the investigation was still in its early stages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2013 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
OAKLAND - It was a quiet evening by this city's standards, and still the police emergency lines were lighting up. As screams rang out behind her, a caller said her neighbor was being beaten. A woman reported that a front door down the street had been bashed in by a possible intruder. Another said a family member with a knife and supply of methamphetamine was threatening to kill herself. By 7:30 p.m. there were 40 calls requiring squad cars on the eastern half of town but no officers available to respond.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court, already poised to decide one hot-button political issue during an election year, may also tackle the Obama administration's challenge to Arizona's law requiring its police to check the immigration status of people who are stopped. At issue is not only who can enforce immigration laws but also what the policy should be for the millions of illegal immigrants living and working in the country. President Obama's team has targeted for deportation illegal immigrants who are criminals, smugglers and repeat border crossers, not those who obey the criminal laws.
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