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Enforcement

SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | By Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times
Time. It's a topic that doesn't much affect Roger Federer. The owner of 17 major titles and the defending champion of the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells never wastes time. He certainly didn't on Monday, taking only 61 minutes to defeat Ivan Dodig of Croatia, 6-3, 6-1, in the third round at Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Federer doesn't fiddle with his clothing or walk in dizzying circles after a tense point. Whether he hits a swift winning shot after a short rally or mishits a losing shot after running and running during a long point, Federer just moves ahead.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Michele Wein Layne decided on a career change 17 years ago when she was at her office at 10 p.m. poring over a mind-numbing legal document. Layne was an up-and-coming corporate litigation lawyer at a big Los Angeles law firm. But the grueling hours and unrewarding work left her miserable. She wanted something more meaningful, and soon after joined the Securities and Exchange Commission's local office as a lawyer fighting investment fraud and insider trading. After a series of promotions, she was chosen last month to lead the 150-person office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1995
This ordinance simply deals with what's already in place. We have home-based occupations. What we need to do is regulate and control them. In the long run, there are many benefits. First, it legalizes what is already being done. It generates money for the city that will help with the tax base. It provides for better licensing control and regulation because we will now have a clear definition of who can and who cannot operate in residences. And, of course, it allows people to operate legally the kind of businesses that should be conducted from home, which by the way are often constitutionally protected--a writer for example.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Andrew Blankstein and Marisa Gerber
The gunman accused of killing four people in a Santa Monica shooting rampage Friday was apparently angry over his parents' divorce and had some mental health issues in the past, a law enforcement source told The Times. The suspect was identified by five law enforcement sources in Washington and Los Angeles as John Zawahri, in his 20s. Other sources with knowledge of the investigation said detectives believe the shooting was sparked by a family dispute of some kind but emphasized that the investigation was still in its early stages.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Melanie Mason and Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
BOSTON - Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told investigators that he and his older brother planned the Boston Marathon bombings only a week or so before the race, that they were operating alone, and that they received no training or support from outside terrorist groups, officials said Tuesday. His comments appear to support investigators' theory that the attack was hastily conceived by two siblings who were self-radicalized. Writing answers from his hospital bed because he was shot in the throat, the 19-year-old accused bomber also said that his slain older brother, Tamerlan, was "upset" by the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and that anger was the motivation to plant two crude homemade bombs along the crowded race route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | By Lee Romney
OAKLAND - This city's beleaguered Police Department entered 2013 in full defensive mode. The crime rate had soared. Staffing was off sharply. And memories of the heavy-handed police response to Occupy protests 14 months earlier - and the lawsuits it generated - remained fresh. Scrambling for a turnaround, elected leaders hired out-of-state consultants to overhaul policing strategy and launched the first new police academies in years to beef up the force. The federal judge overseeing a settlement agreement over racial profiling and the beating and framing of suspects named a compliance director, giving him near-total control over the department.
BOOKS
November 10, 1985 | John Sutherland, Sutherland teaches English at Caltech. and
Like Jack London, Joseph Wambaugh made himself a writer despite the odds against him. The outline of his career is well publicized. He was born in Pittsburgh, a policeman's son. The family background was solidly working class and Roman Catholic. When Joe was 14, they moved to Los Angeles. At 17, he joined the Marines. In 1960, he entered the LAPD and served on the force for 14 years, retiring with the rank of detective sergeant.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California's labor commissioner has sued real estate brokerage ZipRealty Inc. for nearly $18 million, including back pay, in her department's largest minimum-wage enforcement action. The complaint, filed Monday in Alameda County Superior Court, accused the Emeryville, Calif., firm of failing to pay minimum wages and overtime to hundreds of agents throughout the state. ZipRealty markets homes statewide and nationally through the Internet but relies on employee agents to respond to online queries and shepherd deals to closing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990
The last thing we need is more "dog parks." Because of irresponsible dog owners and virtually non-existent law enforcement, everywhere they go becomes "dog toilets." The rest of us are sick of it and them! SUSU LEVY Encino
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