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Enforcement

NATIONAL
May 17, 2012 | Bloomberg News
A New York federal judge temporarily blocked enforcement of a provision in the National Defense Authorization Act that opponents contend could subject them to indefinite military detention for political activism, news reporting or other 1st Amendment activities. U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest in Manhattan ruled Wednesday in favor of a group of writers and activists who sued President Obama, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and the Defense Department. Obama signed the bill into law Dec. 31. The complaint was filed Jan. 13 by a group including former New York Times reporter Christopher Hedges.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Michele Wein Layne decided on a career change 17 years ago when she was at her office at 10 p.m. poring over a mind-numbing legal document. Layne was an up-and-coming corporate litigation lawyer at a big Los Angeles law firm. But the grueling hours and unrewarding work left her miserable. She wanted something more meaningful, and soon after joined the Securities and Exchange Commission's local office as a lawyer fighting investment fraud and insider trading. After a series of promotions, she was chosen last month to lead the 150-person office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1995
This ordinance simply deals with what's already in place. We have home-based occupations. What we need to do is regulate and control them. In the long run, there are many benefits. First, it legalizes what is already being done. It generates money for the city that will help with the tax base. It provides for better licensing control and regulation because we will now have a clear definition of who can and who cannot operate in residences. And, of course, it allows people to operate legally the kind of businesses that should be conducted from home, which by the way are often constitutionally protected--a writer for example.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2013 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
OAKLAND - It was a quiet evening by this city's standards, and still the police emergency lines were lighting up. As screams rang out behind her, a caller said her neighbor was being beaten. A woman reported that a front door down the street had been bashed in by a possible intruder. Another said a family member with a knife and supply of methamphetamine was threatening to kill herself. By 7:30 p.m. there were 40 calls requiring squad cars on the eastern half of town but no officers available to respond.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Melanie Mason and Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
BOSTON - Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told investigators that he and his older brother planned the Boston Marathon bombings only a week or so before the race, that they were operating alone, and that they received no training or support from outside terrorist groups, officials said Tuesday. His comments appear to support investigators' theory that the attack was hastily conceived by two siblings who were self-radicalized. Writing answers from his hospital bed because he was shot in the throat, the 19-year-old accused bomber also said that his slain older brother, Tamerlan, was "upset" by the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and that anger was the motivation to plant two crude homemade bombs along the crowded race route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Andrew Blankstein and Marisa Gerber
The gunman accused of killing four people in a Santa Monica shooting rampage Friday was apparently angry over his parents' divorce and had some mental health issues in the past, a law enforcement source told The Times. The suspect was identified by five law enforcement sources in Washington and Los Angeles as John Zawahri, in his 20s. Other sources with knowledge of the investigation said detectives believe the shooting was sparked by a family dispute of some kind but emphasized that the investigation was still in its early stages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Richard Winton and Brian Bennett
The man suspected of opening fire at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, killing a TSA agent, was shot in the leg and head, making it difficult for authorities to gather information, a law enforcement official told The Times. The suspected shooter, identified by police as 23-year-old  Paul Anthony Ciancia, was hospitalized in critical condition. He was wounded by an LAX police officer and sergeant as he shot his way through Terminal 3 shortly after 9 a.m., authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990
The last thing we need is more "dog parks." Because of irresponsible dog owners and virtually non-existent law enforcement, everywhere they go becomes "dog toilets." The rest of us are sick of it and them! SUSU LEVY Encino
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