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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
Federal environmental officials are objecting strongly to the proposed issuance of a permit for Pamo Dam, claiming that the San Diego region can meet its emergency water needs through construction of an alternate project that inflicts far less damage on the environment. In a lengthy report to be sent to the Army Corps of Engineers this week, U.S.
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OPINION
April 22, 2014 | Patt Morrison
"Fracking" - now there's a word that just begs for a bumper sticker. Short for "hydraulic fracturing" - the process of breaking open rock with high-pressure liquids to get at otherwise untappable oil and natural gas - fracking conjures up a welcome energy boom for some, ecological disaster for others. Mark Zoback - Stanford geophysicist since 1984, member of the National Academy of Engineering's Deepwater Horizon investigation committee, personal "decarbonizer," fracking expert - sees the problems and the potential for California.
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SCIENCE
August 5, 2012 | By Scott Gold
Engineers have sent their final command to Curiosity, which is less than 13,000 miles from Mars and closing in fast. Al Chen, an engineer on Curiosity's entry, descent and landing team, said from inside mission control that a transmitter that had been sending commands to the spacecraft during its long journey to Mars had been turned off as planned at 9:11 p.m. PDT, a little more than an hour before landing. Engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, Chen said, "will no longer be sending any commands.
OPINION
April 20, 2014 | By Michael S. Teitelbaum
We've all heard the dire pronouncements: U.S. science and technology is losing ground to its global competitors because of a nationwide shortage of scientists and engineers, due primarily to the many failures of K-12 education. But are these gloomy assertions accurate? Nearly all of the independent scholars and analysts who have examined the claims of widespread shortages have found little or no evidence to support them. Salaries in these occupations are generally flat, and unemployment rates are about the same or higher than in others requiring advanced education.
SCIENCE
August 10, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The Curiosity rover's landing wasn't quite perfect -- but if the Martian robot were an Olympic gymnast, it could earn a gold medal for its gymnastic contortions, according to NASA engineers. The Mars Science Laboratory's climactic Aug. 5 landing essentially happened on autopilot, with scientists and engineers in the control room at Jet Propulsion Laboratory waiting several minutes as the rover's signals traveled the roughly 150 million miles back to Earth. But Curiosity ended up roughly 1.5 miles away from its predicted touchdown zone - not bad, given that their projected landing zone was an ellipse 12 miles wide, mission engineers said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1992
After reading your article (June 5) I continue to believe that the shortage of qualified engineers and scientists is an impediment to maintaining our long-term national competitiveness in the global aviation marketplace. It is not the present abundance of unqualified people, but the long-term shortage of qualified people that requires rectification. On May 14, the Aerospace Engineering Department at San Diego State University was dissolved. The university president made this decision in reaction to California State University's short-term budgetary problems.
SCIENCE
September 27, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Tech soothsayers have long predicted the demise of computers as we know them today, as their shrinking sizes approach the limits of silicon's ability to take the heat. Now, researchers at Stanford University - in the heart of Silicon Valley - have tossed the essential element aside and built a basic computer out of carbon nanotubes. The engineering feat, described this week in the journal Nature, could herald the birth of a whole new generation of carbon-based computing devices, experts said.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley, Tribune Washington Bureau
-- More than a week into their quest to stop the oil pouring into the Gulf of Mexico from a damaged BP well, several dozen of the brightest minds in the engineering world gathered to watch a 100-ton failure unfold in slow motion. The engineers packed into a repurposed research center dubbed the Hive, which houses a dozen video screens and, most days, about as many scientists. Beside a bustling freeway, in a drab Houston office park bedecked with nearly every name in Big Oil, BP had launched a 21st century version of "Apollo 13."
BUSINESS
October 16, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
When people talk about competition in the auto industry, it's often couched in terms of the Detroit automakers versus the big Asian import brands - in other words, General Motors and Ford versus Toyota and Honda. In a Tuesday address to the SAE Convergence Conference in Detroit, GM North America President Mark Reuss talked about a different competition faced by the auto industry - the ability to recruit top engineers from high-tech, fast growth “glamour” industries. “We need to convince them that the automotive field is the most dynamic, exciting industry on earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1997
Los Angeles' Bureau of Engineering is failing to provide adequate oversight of city engineers who moonlight, according to an audit released Friday by the controller's office. Some vital information was missing from some engineers who reported working for others, including where the engineers were employed and how much money they were earning. Without that information, it is impossible to know whether the engineers are complying with the city's conflict-of-interest laws.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Fruit flies seem to have a preternatural ability to evade annoyed swatters. Now, laser-wielding scientists have discovered the secret of these winged escape artists: They execute speedy hairpin turns by banking in the same way that fighter jets do. The aerial skills of Drosophila hydei , described this month in the journal Science, could provide insight into the complex neural circuitry that makes such impressive maneuvers possible - and perhaps...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Allen E. Puckett, one of the engineers who after World War II built Los Angeles-based Hughes Aircraft Co. into the nation's leading defense electronics firm - dominant in the markets for air defense, radar systems, tactical missiles and satellites - has died. He was 94. One of the nation's top technologists and defense executives during the Cold War, Puckett died March 31 at his home in Pacific Palisades after suffering a stroke. His wife, Marilyn, confirmed his death. "Allen Puckett was one of the guiding spirits of Hughes Aircraft," said Malcolm Currie, a former deputy defense secretary who later followed in Puckett's footsteps as another president of the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant and Louis Sahagun
Faced with losing an ambitious $1-billion plan to revamp the Los Angeles River, Mayor Eric Garcetti on Friday raised the stakes by offering to split the cost with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The corps, which manages the river as a flood control channel, last year recommended a $453-million package of parks, bike paths and other enhancements to make the river more inviting to Angelenos. It recently informed the mayor's office that it was sticking with that plan rather than pursuing the $1-billion version, known as Alternative 20, that Garcetti backs.
AUTOS
April 10, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
General Motors has placed two engineers at the center of its delayed recall scandal on paid leave. GM Chief Executive Mary Barra confirmed Thursday that engineers Ray DeGiorgio and Gary Altman were put on leave following a briefing from Anton Valukas, the former U.S. attorney overseeing an independent investigation into circumstances leading to a safety recall of 2.6 million older GM cars because of a faulty ignition switch. “This is an interim step as we seek the truth about what happened,” Barra said.
AUTOS
April 10, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
General Motors announced Thursday it will take a $1.3-billion write-down to cover the cost of repairs related to faulty ignition switch recalls, and placed two engineers at the center of the recall scandal on paid leave. The company also said it will replace a second part in the affected cars. GM Chief Executive Mary Barra confirmed Thursday that engineers Ray DeGiorgio and Gary Altman were put on leave following a briefing from Anton Valukas, the former U.S. attorney overseeing an independent investigation into circumstances leading to a safety recall of 2.6 million GM cars because of a faulty ignition switch.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
After years of eliminating jobs in Southern California, aerospace giant Boeing Co. announced plans to increase its engineering workforce in Long Beach and Seal Beach by 1,000 positions. It is a rare and welcome development for the Southland's beleaguered aerospace industry, which has been stung by layoffs and assembly line closures for decades. "I couldn't be happier for the region," Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster said. "We want to continue to carry on our aviation tradition here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2013
A series of cracks are veining through the historic Watts Towers, a recurring problem that's forcing engineers to rethink how they repair the sculpture. Join us at 9 a.m. as we discuss the towers and the problems facing it with Times reporter Angel Jennings. The towers have been deteriorating for years, prompting quick patch jobs that did little long-term good. A worker with binoculars would spot a crack, panic and rush to seal it over with cement and other materials. But the cracks always came back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992
In response to "A Rude Shock for Engineers of Dreams," By James F. Glass, Commentary, Nov. 9: I share Glass' concern for the space program and the engineers who made it successful, but disagree with his implication of environmental and social activism as the cause of the decline he describes. Glass seems to forget that social liberals have had virtually no voice in government for the past 12 years. They have competed for government dollars on much the same footing as the space program, and all have contended jointly with a philosophy that says no endeavor is worthy of government support if it can't succeed on its own commercially.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co., which for years has been cutting its workforce in Southern California, announced that it plans to increase its engineering workforce in Long Beach and Seal Beach by 1,000 positions over the next two years. It is a surprising announcement from the plane maker, which has 1,800 commercial engineers in Long Beach and Seal Beach. The company said earlier in the week that it would shutter its C-17 production line three months earlier than planned in mid-2015.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Say hello to Robin Seggelmann. The name may not ring a bell, but his handiwork has gained worldwide notoriety. Seggelman, it seems, is the poor soul who wrote the flawed piece of code that has come to be known as the Heartbleed bug. According to his profile on the LinuxTag conference website, Seggelmann is a " researcher for the transport protocols of the Internet. Occasionally his work find its way into standards of the Internet Engineering Taskorce (IETF). In a manner of speaking he helps writing the technical 'laws' of the Internet.
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