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NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Horse racing was canceled throughout Britain, a major international rugby match was called off and the government extended restrictions on the movement of livestock as fears about the impact of foot-and-mouth disease mounted Tuesday. Outbreaks of the highly contagious livestock ailment were identified at six new sites, bringing the number of locations where cases had been confirmed to 18.
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NEWS
April 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Scientists in Britain say a greatly expanded program of livestock slaughter will be the only effective way to stop the spread of foot-and-mouth disease among the nation's farm animals. Researchers at the Imperial College School of Medicine in London have called for a policy of "ring culling," a system in which all livestock within about a mile of an infected animal are killed.
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NEWS
April 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Scientists in Britain say a greatly expanded program of livestock slaughter will be the only effective way to stop the spread of foot-and-mouth disease among the nation's farm animals. Researchers at the Imperial College School of Medicine in London have called for a policy of "ring culling," a system in which all livestock within about a mile of an infected animal are killed.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Tony Blair said Wednesday that a controversial program to vaccinate farm animals against foot-and-mouth disease may not be necessary because widespread slaughter appears to be stemming the epidemic's spread.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British farmers' bitter harvest of foot-and-mouth disease drew heartfelt sympathy from lovers of rural England in the early days of the outbreak. Those noble yeomen on the rebound from the "mad cow" crisis didn't deserve another sucker punch, public sentiment went. But six weeks later, as the epidemic spirals out of control and the killing fields of Cumbria dominate the evening news, opinion has begun to shift against farmers who "spread disease" and "blackmail us" for government funds.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
British Prime Minister Tony Blair announced that he was postponing local elections by a month to fight foot-and-mouth disease, signaling that plans for a general election would also have to wait. Blair said local council elections set for May 3 would be held June 7.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
As scientists warned that the worst of the foot-and-mouth outbreak is yet to come, Britain considered two highly unpopular options Friday--expanding a massive slaughtering plan and vaccinating animals against the disease. In further grim news, French agricultural officials Friday reported a new case of foot-and-mouth east of Paris--the second French farm to be struck with the disease. The first was in the northwestern village of La Baroche-Gondouin.
NEWS
April 2, 1996 | From The Washington Post
British agriculture officials Monday proposed a phased destruction of about 4.5 million cattle--three-quarters of a million annually--as a step to assure consumers that diseased beef is off the world's markets. They presented the plan to the European Union at a meeting in Luxembourg, according to Ben Gill, vice president of Britain's National Farmers Union, in an effort to obtain financial aid for the "selective slaughter" and a lifting of the EU's worldwide ban on British beef exports.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | From Reuters
Edwina Currie, the junior health minister who sparked a major controversy by saying most of Britain's eggs were contaminated, resigned Friday. A government spokesman said Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher accepted the 42-year-old politician's resignation with "great personal sadness." Currie said in a television interview two weeks ago that most of Britain's eggs were infected with salmonella bacteria, which causes food poisoning.
NEWS
March 15, 2001
With termed-out City Councilwoman Laura Chick running for city controller, six candidates are vying to represent the southwest San Fernando Valley in a wide-open race for her 3rd District seat. What sets Encino resident Judith Hirshberg apart is not only the depth of her experience in the Valley--she ran the Valley office of former City Councilman Marvin Braude and worked in the Valley office of the late Mayor Tom Bradley--but the breadth of her vision for Los Angeles. The Times endorses Hirshberg in the April 10 primary.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British farmers' bitter harvest of foot-and-mouth disease drew heartfelt sympathy from lovers of rural England in the early days of the outbreak. Those noble yeomen on the rebound from the "mad cow" crisis didn't deserve another sucker punch, public sentiment went. But six weeks later, as the epidemic spirals out of control and the killing fields of Cumbria dominate the evening news, opinion has begun to shift against farmers who "spread disease" and "blackmail us" for government funds.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
British Prime Minister Tony Blair announced that he was postponing local elections by a month to fight foot-and-mouth disease, signaling that plans for a general election would also have to wait. Blair said local council elections set for May 3 would be held June 7.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the number of cases rising like flood waters in an unrelenting storm, foot-and-mouth disease has cut a swath of economic devastation through the heart of Britain's farming and tourism industries in the five weeks since it first appeared at an Essex slaughterhouse, and it now threatens to do the same in continental Europe and Ireland. The disease that knows no borders has already struck at least 520 farms throughout Britain.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
As scientists warned that the worst of the foot-and-mouth outbreak is yet to come, Britain considered two highly unpopular options Friday--expanding a massive slaughtering plan and vaccinating animals against the disease. In further grim news, French agricultural officials Friday reported a new case of foot-and-mouth east of Paris--the second French farm to be struck with the disease. The first was in the northwestern village of La Baroche-Gondouin.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain's chief vet brushed aside angry protests from farmers and pledged to push ahead with a mass cull of healthy animals in areas stricken by the foot-and-mouth livestock epidemic sweeping the country. The government's chief veterinary officer, Jim Scudamore, spent hours in talks with farmers from Cumbria in northwestern England--one of the worst-affected areas--but was not swayed by their pleas to spare the lives of animals not yet infected.
NEWS
March 15, 2001
With termed-out City Councilwoman Laura Chick running for city controller, six candidates are vying to represent the southwest San Fernando Valley in a wide-open race for her 3rd District seat. What sets Encino resident Judith Hirshberg apart is not only the depth of her experience in the Valley--she ran the Valley office of former City Councilman Marvin Braude and worked in the Valley office of the late Mayor Tom Bradley--but the breadth of her vision for Los Angeles. The Times endorses Hirshberg in the April 10 primary.
NEWS
May 4, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The destruction of cattle considered most at risk from "mad cow disease" got off to a halting start Friday with more bureaucratic tangles than drama. About 100 cows older than 30 months were slaughtered in Scotland, stained with an indelible yellow dye and then sent to be rendered, keeping them out of the food chain. Thousands more animals will be destroyed and their remains incinerated as the program gathers speed next week.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1996 | From Reuters
European gardeners who deal in the seeds of the Lazy Housewife French bean, the ballerina tomato or the Bedford Market rearguard Brussels sprout are the vegetable world's equivalent of drug runners. The tasty traditional varieties are among hundreds of types of fruits and vegetables that fall afoul of a European Union law that decrees that only seeds on an official register may be legally marketed.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Horse racing was canceled throughout Britain, a major international rugby match was called off and the government extended restrictions on the movement of livestock as fears about the impact of foot-and-mouth disease mounted Tuesday. Outbreaks of the highly contagious livestock ailment were identified at six new sites, bringing the number of locations where cases had been confirmed to 18.
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