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SPORTS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
A James Bond-style ultrasonic gun disguised as a pair of binoculars was used to stun a top thoroughbred during a race, and could have become the key tool in a massive drug and betting conspiracy, a British court was told Tuesday. Defense attorney Jonathan Goldberg said the high-pitched sound from the gun caused the thoroughbred, Ile de Chypre, to veer suddenly and throw jockey Greville Starkey as they were heading for victory at Ascot racecourse on June 16, 1988.
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NEWS
July 9, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Tim Henman's rain-delayed, nail-biting quest for a shot at the Wimbledon title ended in defeat Sunday, British tennis fans let out a collective sigh of resignation mixed with relief. Three days of hoping against hope had come to naught. At least the wait was over. "The capacity to live with disappointment is an essential requirement of followers of British sport," the Independent on Sunday newspaper said. And that was before Henman lost the Wimbledon semifinals to Croatian Goran Ivanisevic.
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SPORTS
August 16, 1994 | Associated Press
The head of the soccer players' union in England doesn't like Americans playing on his home turf. "Not so long ago we were teaching the Americans how to play," Gordon Taylor said Monday. "Now I've got work permits for them piling up on my desk. It could be disastrous for us." Coventry City pursued U.S. defender Alexi Lalas, who signed last month with Padova of Italy's first division.
SPORTS
June 27, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY
Virginia Wade--"Our Ginny," as the local tabloids proudly referred to her--won the women's singles title at Wimbledon in 1977. Queen Elizabeth watched from the royal box. She hasn't been back since. Nor has any British player--man or woman--been back for a singles final on Center Court. The closest was the late Fred Perry.
SPORTS
April 21, 1988 | Jim Murray
You begin with the fact that apartheid is a cancer on the world body politic--to say nothing of its soul. You combat it the best way you can. But you don't throw maidens into a volcano. Neither do you conduct a lifelong vendetta against a young female runner. And you don't get Great Britain thrown out of the Olympic Games. The aim of the Supreme Council of Sport in Africa and the African-bloc nations in the international track and field federation is laudable.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The circumstances were uncanny. They were 6-foot-7 basketball players. They were 23 years old. They wore No. 44. They collapsed during games and died five days apart. Victims of heart problems. Tony Penny, formerly a Central Connecticut State player, died Feb. 27 in a Manchester, England, hospital after collapsing during a game. But the similarities to the death of Loyola Marymount's Hank Gathers don't end there.
NEWS
September 3, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This gritty, nondescript city, which prides itself on being the cradle of the Industrial Revolution, is in the last throes of an expensive battle to capture the summer Olympic Games in the year 2000.
SPORTS
August 11, 1987 | Associated Press
After a weekend that was supposed to highlight the best of soccer, an upstart import was applauded Monday for overshadowing the latest case of fan rowdiness at English sports. From event organizers to newspaper columnists, American football was hailed as an exciting, family oriented game unsullied by the misbehavior in the crowds that has become an uninvited guest at so many sports events in England in recent years.
SPORTS
August 29, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
If one can judge by the questions at a news conference, Robert Scott, the Manchester, England, theater owner who serves as chairman of his city's bid committee for the 1996 Summer Olympics, should close his latest show before the curtain rises.
SPORTS
April 28, 1988
Black African nations "are ready to participate in the Seoul Olympics," a spokesman said, apparently satisfied at the International Amateur Athletic Federation's effort to bar Zola Budd. But Sam Ramsamy, general secretary of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee, also leveled stinging criticism at John Holt, secretary general of the IAAF, accusing Holt, a Briton, of ineptitude and possible bias.
SPORTS
February 13, 2001 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before leaving for England on Saturday to talk to at least one Premier League soccer team, free agent Cobi Jones said he preferred not to identify the club in question. "All I'm going to say is that it's a top-10 team," Jones said. "I'd like to leave it to the team to announce something if it wants to." On Monday, it turned out that Jones is negotiating with Ipswich Town, a 123-year-old club that ranks sixth in England's top flight.
SPORTS
November 8, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Xenophobia is an extraordinary thing, and these days England is awash in it. Take, for example, the ugly reaction that bubbled to the surface last week when the English Football Assn., to its vast credit, broke 128 years of tradition and named a foreigner as England's national team coach. The five-year, $2.6 million-a-year contract accepted by Sweden's Sven-Goran Eriksson was greeted with howls of anger and outrage from expected and unexpected quarters. "Disaster!" shrieked the Daily Mirror.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a blow to Rupert Murdoch's sports expansion, the British government on Friday blocked a $1-billion bid by the media magnate's British Sky Broadcasting to take over this nation's most famous soccer team, Manchester United. Industry and Trade Secretary Stephen Byers said his decision was based on the recommendations of the Monopolies and Mergers Commission, which conducted a six-month investigation of the proposed deal.
SPORTS
December 16, 1998 | Associated Press
The head of English soccer quit Tuesday amid questions regarding a $5.3-million loan in the latest potential bribery scandal to hit sports. The resignation of Graham Kelly, chief executive of the English Football Assn., arises from a loan promised to the Welsh Football Assn. Newspaper reports have interpreted the loan as an attempted bribe by English FA chairman Keith Wiseman to help him gain a top job with FIFA, soccer's governing body.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is one reason media mogul Rupert Murdoch would spend $1 billion and change to buy Britain's most revered soccer team--more than three times what he paid for the Los Angeles Dodgers--and it is not just to tweak the noses of Manchester United fans. Even more than potential profits, owning one of the leading teams in the world's most popular sport gives Murdoch's News Corp.
SPORTS
September 7, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remember the $311 million that Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation shelled out to buy the Dodgers in March? It was small change. The latest target of the Australian-born media tycoon could cost him more than three times as much. The British Sky Broadcasting Group (BSkyB), which is 40% owned by News Corporation, is offering a staggering $958 million for one of the world's top soccer teams, Manchester United of England's Premier League.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Geraldine Lester recognized those hooligans who were trashing central London last weekend. They're the same sort as "those terrible people from the football terraces," she said, referring to the drunken ruffians often seen in the crowds in the standing-only sections at soccer games. Sometimes the English call them "lager louts," sometimes "yobbos."
SPORTS
July 8, 1990 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If West Germany's Lothar Matthaeus wants to finish as the World Cup's top goal-scorer, he will have to produce a hat trick today against Argentina in the championship match. Matthaeus comes into the 11 a.m. PDT match at Rome's Olympic Stadium with four goals, two fewer than Italy's Salvatore Schillaci. The odds are against Matthaeus succeeding. Only one other player in history--England's Geoff Hurst in 1966--has scored three goals in a World Cup final.
SPORTS
June 9, 1998
COLOMBIA * World Cup Record: Played 10, won two, lost six, tied two, goals for 13, goals against 21. * Best Finish: Second round, 1990. * 1994 Showing: Eliminated in the first round. * Coach: Hernan Dario Gomez. He was the assistant coach in 1994 but rose to the top job despite the debacle that year. Has stuck with the same players, which might be a mistake. * Players to Watch: Jorge Bermudez, Freddy Rincon, Anthony de Avila, Carlos Valderrama, Faustino Asprilla.
SPORTS
May 10, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Long before there was a World Cup or a European Cup or a Copa America or even an MLS Cup, there was England's Football Assn. Cup, better known to fans worldwide simply as the FA Cup. It is soccer's oldest competition, the granddaddy of all cups. First competed for in the 1871-72 season, it reaches its annual climax Saturday when Arsenal and Newcastle United meet at Wembley in this year's final.
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