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NEWS
December 21, 1999 | Reuters
Melita Norwood, the 87-year-old British great-grandmother who admitted spying for the Soviet Union during the Cold War, will not face prosecution, legal authorities said Monday. Norwood said in September that she passed secrets to Moscow while working in Britain's atomic weapons program after World War II. Solicitor General Ross Cranston said cases of four other alleged spies revealed in KGB papers published this year would not be pursued.
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NEWS
April 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
A Belarussian man was convicted for the murders of two Jewish women in 1942 and sentenced to life in prison Thursday in Britain's first war crimes prosecution. Anthony Sawoniuk, 78, had denied killing the women while serving in the local police in his hometown of Domachevo, Belarus, during the German occupation. Sawoniuk, a retired British Rail employee, was accused of killing a woman who was among at least 15 people mowed down with a submachine gun as they stood naked by a pit in Domachevo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Chileans who suffered abuses under military rule cheered the British court ruling Wednesday that former dictator Augusto Pinochet is not immune from prosecution for human rights atrocities, but were disappointed by the limitations it imposed on the bid to extradite him to Spain.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's highest court on Wednesday rejected former dictator Augusto Pinochet's claim of immunity from prosecution for human rights crimes committed while he ruled Chile, but it drastically reduced the charges that can be brought against him and the chances that he will be extradited to Spain for trial.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Vatican confirmed Friday that it intervened in the extradition row over Gen. Augusto Pinochet, asking the British government to send the former Chilean dictator home. Spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said the Vatican made its appeal about a month ago after a request from the Chilean government. Pinochet was arrested Oct. 16 in London on a Spanish warrant alleging that he ordered killings, torture and hostage-taking during his 17-year rule.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Britain's highest court wrapped up hearings Thursday to determine Gen. Augusto Pinochet's fate, with opposing lawyers contending that human rights law would be reduced to a "meek little mouse" if he goes free. The judges from the House of Lords said they would begin private considerations and announce "in due course" their ruling on whether the former Chilean dictator is immune from prosecution for crimes against humanity that he is accused of committing during his 17-year rule.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Privy Council in London has ordered Trinidad and Tobago to reopen the case of a 36-year-old woman who was sentenced to death in the murder of her husband after enduring nearly a decade of severe physical abuse.
NEWS
January 19, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet is not immune from prosecution as a former head of state because he committed many crimes before he seized power, lawyers for the British and Spanish governments told Britain's highest court Monday. The lawyers, seeking Pinochet's extradition to Spain on charges of murder, torture and kidnapping, made the argument on the opening day of an unprecedented rehearing of the court's own case.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The House of Lords overturned its original ruling denying immunity to former Gen. Augusto Pinochet to maintain public confidence in the integrity of British justice, the judges involved said in legal papers. A new panel is scheduled Monday to consider again if the former Chilean dictator can be held in Britain pending a decision on extradition to Spain for gross human rights abuses. Pinochet, who remains under police guard in a rented mansion west of London, was arrested Oct.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
In an unprecedented move, Britain's highest court Thursday set aside its own ruling against Gen. Augusto Pinochet because a judge failed to disclose his ties to Amnesty International. The decision rattled the judiciary and stalled Spain's efforts to extradite the former Chilean dictator. Responding to the legal debacle in the House of Lords, the head of Britain's judiciary said top judges must be required to declare possible conflicts and withdraw from cases where bias might be inferred.
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