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TRAVEL
January 14, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Cue the college choir. Roll the "Brideshead Revisited" footage. Lay out the strawberries and clotted cream. And let me begin by saying, ahem, that it's a rich experience, reflecting upon one's days at Oxford. The morning sun through the high stained-glass windows of the dining hall. The undistinguished food on the table. The expertise and eccentricity of one's classmates. The time-honored squalor of the dormitories. The history underfoot and overhead.
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TRAVEL
January 20, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds
OXFORD, England -- Cue the college choir. Roll the "Brideshead Revisited" footage. Lay out the strawberries and clotted cream. And let me begin by saying, ahem, that it's a rich experience, reflecting upon one's days at Oxford. The morning sun through the high stained-glass windows of the dining hall. The undistinguished food on the table. The expertise and eccentricity of one's classmates. The time-honored squalor of the dormitories. The history underfoot and overhead. Even now, one can close one's eyes and see the severe geometry of the Christ Church quadrangle cloaked in the shadows of dusk.
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NEWS
May 31, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A star public high school student turned down by Oxford University but accepted at Harvard with $100,000 in financial aid has become the poster child of a British government war on snobbery. To Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown of the Labor Party, the Oxford medical school's rejection of 18-year-old Laura Spence--a straight-A student from economically disadvantaged northeastern England--is a sterling example of the elitism rampant in Britain's top universities and "an absolute scandal."
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A star public high school student turned down by Oxford University but accepted at Harvard with $100,000 in financial aid has become the poster child of a British government war on snobbery. To Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown of the Labor Party, the Oxford medical school's rejection of 18-year-old Laura Spence--a straight-A student from economically disadvantaged northeastern England--is a sterling example of the elitism rampant in Britain's top universities and "an absolute scandal."
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Morale is low at Britain's two ancient universities, Oxford and Cambridge. Twice since 1981, the government has cut their financial support by 11%, stunting academic salaries, stifling research and shrinking faculty levels.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Italian automaker Fiat is now in the same league as Nissan of Japan, academically speaking. It has pledged $1.1 million to keep Italian studies alive at Oxford University, officials say. Since 1979, Nissan has funded the chair in modern Japanese studies at Britain's oldest university, which has been hurt by cuts in government grants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The British Medical Assn. has approved a game for schoolchildren with cards depicting condoms and sperm donation to teach children 11 to 18 about the dangers of AIDS. The game released last week consists of 28 cards depicting a range of social and sexual activities that children are asked to define as either safe or as posing a risk of transmitting acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Among the safe behaviors are shaking hands, kissing, sharing food, donating blood and coughing and sneezing.
NEWS
October 17, 1988 | From Reuters
Nearly half the respondents in a British survey were unable to add the prices of a simple restaurant menu and one in six couldn't pick out Britain on a world map, according to a poll in the Sunday Times. The survey of 1,000 people showed 42% of those questioned were unable to total three items on a hamburger menu. About 17% could not find Britain on a map--placing it off the coast of North America or even in the Far East.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxford University is putting the squeeze on Kate Ravenscroft. It has withdrawn the first-year student's electronic card, which gives her access to the library, and closed her free e-mail account. And her college at Oxford has given her an ultimatum: Pay up or get out.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Love her or hate her, few Britons would deny that Margaret Thatcher, the grocer's daughter from central England, has been the most dominant British political personality since her idol, the late Winston Churchill. The second-longest-serving British prime minister ever and the most durable in more than 160 years (since Robert Banks Jenkinson Liverpool), she profoundly transformed her country by what sometimes seemed sheer force of will.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxford University is putting the squeeze on Kate Ravenscroft. It has withdrawn the first-year student's electronic card, which gives her access to the library, and closed her free e-mail account. And her college at Oxford has given her an ultimatum: Pay up or get out.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Love her or hate her, few Britons would deny that Margaret Thatcher, the grocer's daughter from central England, has been the most dominant British political personality since her idol, the late Winston Churchill. The second-longest-serving British prime minister ever and the most durable in more than 160 years (since Robert Banks Jenkinson Liverpool), she profoundly transformed her country by what sometimes seemed sheer force of will.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The British Medical Assn. has approved a game for schoolchildren with cards depicting condoms and sperm donation to teach children 11 to 18 about the dangers of AIDS. The game released last week consists of 28 cards depicting a range of social and sexual activities that children are asked to define as either safe or as posing a risk of transmitting acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Among the safe behaviors are shaking hands, kissing, sharing food, donating blood and coughing and sneezing.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Italian automaker Fiat is now in the same league as Nissan of Japan, academically speaking. It has pledged $1.1 million to keep Italian studies alive at Oxford University, officials say. Since 1979, Nissan has funded the chair in modern Japanese studies at Britain's oldest university, which has been hurt by cuts in government grants.
NEWS
October 17, 1988 | From Reuters
Nearly half the respondents in a British survey were unable to add the prices of a simple restaurant menu and one in six couldn't pick out Britain on a world map, according to a poll in the Sunday Times. The survey of 1,000 people showed 42% of those questioned were unable to total three items on a hamburger menu. About 17% could not find Britain on a map--placing it off the coast of North America or even in the Far East.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Morale is low at Britain's two ancient universities, Oxford and Cambridge. Twice since 1981, the government has cut their financial support by 11%, stunting academic salaries, stifling research and shrinking faculty levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Mollie Sugden, 86, a British actress best known for her role as Mrs. Slocombe in the television comedy series "Are You Being Served?" died Wednesday in London after a long illness, according to her agent, Joan Reddin. With her hair highly coiffed and dyed various outlandish shades, Sugden played the bossy Mrs. Slocombe throughout the run of the innuendo-laden BBC show from 1972 to 1985. Reruns of the show in the United States in the 1990s gained her a new audience overseas. "She was great fun, a very good actress, very versatile.
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