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NEWS
May 10, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
European Union leaders, long accustomed to British skepticism about a united Europe, came to London with nagging questions Friday but went home smiling. After a week in office, Prime Minister Tony Blair is moving quickly--but cautiously--to smooth ruffled feathers among continental partners who admire his winning political flair but wonder how deep his commitment runs to their dream of a united Europe.
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NEWS
May 10, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
European Union leaders, long accustomed to British skepticism about a united Europe, came to London with nagging questions Friday but went home smiling. After a week in office, Prime Minister Tony Blair is moving quickly--but cautiously--to smooth ruffled feathers among continental partners who admire his winning political flair but wonder how deep his commitment runs to their dream of a united Europe.
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NEWS
January 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Western and Southeast Asian nations met Tuesday in Geneva to consider changes in their policy toward Vietnamese "boat people," Hong Kong authorities were coming under increasing fire for the way they determine whether Vietnamese qualify for refugee status.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resignation of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher seems certain to swing Britain into the mainstream of European politics in a crucial period of the Continent's economic and political integration, battling to help shape its future rather than resisting it. Although none of the three contenders for the leadership of the ruling Conservative Party is as stalwart a "European" as a French, Italian or German politician might be, each is committed to the concept of "Britain in Europe."
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resignation of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher seems certain to swing Britain into the mainstream of European politics in a crucial period of the Continent's economic and political integration, battling to help shape its future rather than resisting it. Although none of the three contenders for the leadership of the ruling Conservative Party is as stalwart a "European" as a French, Italian or German politician might be, each is committed to the concept of "Britain in Europe."
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Reuters
Great Britain said Friday that it is pulling out of a major multinational project to build a new NATO naval frigate for the 1990s. The Ministry of Defense said it was withdrawing from the $13-billion program because deadlines were not being met and there seemed little prospect of achieving a common design for the warships. "Taking account of the reduced prospects for achieving a common design, the government has concluded that the timetable does not meet the conditions which it sought," it said.
OPINION
January 24, 2003 | David Martin, David Martin is an Ottawa attorney and contributor to "101 Damnations: The Humorists' Tour of Personal Hells" (St. Martin's Press, 2002).
In the ongoing tradition of questioning celebrities about their reading habits, we've asked a number of famous folks what they are reading now. Realizing, however, that perception and reality do not always jibe, we've also checked out their nightstands to see what they're really reading. George W. Bush: "With a possible war on the horizon, I've been reading Eliot A. Cohen's excellent treatise, 'Supreme Command.' I've also put in an order with Amazon.com for Sun-Tzu's 'The Art of War.'
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Western and Southeast Asian nations met Tuesday in Geneva to consider changes in their policy toward Vietnamese "boat people," Hong Kong authorities were coming under increasing fire for the way they determine whether Vietnamese qualify for refugee status.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Reuters
Great Britain said Friday that it is pulling out of a major multinational project to build a new NATO naval frigate for the 1990s. The Ministry of Defense said it was withdrawing from the $13-billion program because deadlines were not being met and there seemed little prospect of achieving a common design for the warships. "Taking account of the reduced prospects for achieving a common design, the government has concluded that the timetable does not meet the conditions which it sought," it said.
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