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December 21, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Major is making his first visit to Washington as British prime minister with a goal of reaffirming the "special relationship" between Britain and the United States, say sources in his office at 10 Downing Street. The first order of business this morning for the 47-year-old leader, who arrived in Washington late Thursday, will be to appear on U.S. television networks to establish himself as a heavyweight successor to Margaret Thatcher, who was widely respected in U.S. government circles.
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January 2, 1991 | From Reuters
Britain was worried that Iraq might attack Kuwait 30 years ago and drew up plans to dislodge Iraqi troops from the territory, according to newly released government papers. Documents disclosed Tuesday under a 30-year secrecy rule showed that a military committee was asked to consider an operation to drive out Iraqi troops if they invaded Kuwait. Kuwait was then controlled by the British, but a coup had overthrown a pro-British regime in Baghdad.
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NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Reuters
Britain was worried that Iraq might attack Kuwait 30 years ago and drew up plans to dislodge Iraqi troops from the territory, according to newly released government papers. Documents disclosed Tuesday under a 30-year secrecy rule showed that a military committee was asked to consider an operation to drive out Iraqi troops if they invaded Kuwait. Kuwait was then controlled by the British, but a coup had overthrown a pro-British regime in Baghdad.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Major is making his first visit to Washington as British prime minister with a goal of reaffirming the "special relationship" between Britain and the United States, say sources in his office at 10 Downing Street. The first order of business this morning for the 47-year-old leader, who arrived in Washington late Thursday, will be to appear on U.S. television networks to establish himself as a heavyweight successor to Margaret Thatcher, who was widely respected in U.S. government circles.
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