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BUSINESS
August 21, 1987 | From Reuters
In what will be the biggest share offering in history, the British government will sell its remaining stake in British Petroleum Co. in late October for the equivalent of $12.1 billion, the government's financial advisers said Thursday. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's government, which has sold more than 20 state-owned companies to the investing public, will sell its remaining 31.5% stake in BP for $9.7 billion and $2.4 billion worth of new shares, they said.
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NEWS
January 10, 2001 | From Reuters
In a policy turnabout, the British government said Tuesday that it will test armed forces personnel for possible health problems caused by uranium-tipped weapons, while insisting that there was no evidence of a link between the two. Armed Forces Minister John Spellar told Parliament that the government would set up a voluntary screening program for service personnel and civilians who have served in the Balkans.
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NEWS
July 24, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British agents plotted to kill Adolf Hitler at his Bavarian retreat in Berchtesgaden in the final months of World War II, but internal debate and the search for the right assassin kept them from an attempt before the Fuehrer took his own life April 30, 1945.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2001 | Associated Press
British regulators objected to the $3.45-billion purchase of Bass Brewers by Belgium's Interbrew, saying the deal would stifle competition in the beer industry, and ordered Interbrew to sell the British brewer. Interbrew said the ruling "defies logic," but stopped short of saying whether it would comply with the order or appeal the decision.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"TELL US THE TRUTH TONY, Are we being run by a gay mafia?" cried a front-page headline in the Sun tabloid after a second member of Prime Minister Tony Blair's Cabinet announced that he is gay and two others were "outed" in the media. The response Tuesday came not from Blair but from the British public: Who cares?
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | From United Press International
Britain's attempt to quell a controversy over an official's unflattering remarks about Germany foundered Sunday with the publication of a high-level government memo that characterized Germany as an egotistical bully with an inferiority complex. Britain has been publicly reiterating its support of German unification in recent days in the wake of a magazine article in which Nicholas Ridley, minister of trade and industry, was critical of the European Community, Germany and France.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a spectacle as old as Britain's democracy and as contemporary as strategic arms talks, Queen Elizabeth II outlined an ambitious and controversial legislative agenda here Tuesday as she formally opened a new term of Parliament.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 |
Britain is ruling today whether it will free former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet on medical grounds or bow to demands by four European states that he should face a torture trial. British newspapers reported that the 84-year-old general was likely to be freed from 16 months of house arrest, splashing headlines such as "Pinochet Prepares to Fly Home."
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a policy of "sedation," the British government misled the public for years about the threat of fatal "mad cow" disease spreading from cattle to human beings, according to an official report released Thursday. The former Conservative Party government did not deliberately lie to Britons about bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, the report said.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No date has been set for the next general election in Britain, but Prime Minister Tony Blair delivered a rousing appeal for a second term Tuesday after a slew of opinion polls showed his Labor Party trailing the Conservatives for the first time since he took office. In the past two weeks, Blair has been buffeted by fuel protests that nearly shut down the country, demands for higher government pensions from some of his supporters, and public anger over the money-sucking Millennium Dome.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | From Reuters
The British government will not issue a blanket pardon to soldiers shot for desertion or mutiny during World War I, a Defense Ministry spokesman said Sunday. More than 300 soldiers, some as young as 17, were executed for desertion as an example to others during the four-year conflict. "The government decided it could not make a blanket pardon for all those who were shot in the First World War," the spokesman told reporters.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a policy of "sedation," the British government misled the public for years about the threat of fatal "mad cow" disease spreading from cattle to human beings, according to an official report released Thursday. The former Conservative Party government did not deliberately lie to Britons about bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, the report said.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No date has been set for the next general election in Britain, but Prime Minister Tony Blair delivered a rousing appeal for a second term Tuesday after a slew of opinion polls showed his Labor Party trailing the Conservatives for the first time since he took office. In the past two weeks, Blair has been buffeted by fuel protests that nearly shut down the country, demands for higher government pensions from some of his supporters, and public anger over the money-sucking Millennium Dome.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big Brother is not only watching Britons, soon he may be demanding their computer passwords and perusing their e-mail from a new, $40-million cyber-surveillance center in the headquarters of the MI5 domestic spy agency. Under a bill making its way through Parliament, the government would have the right to monitor all online activities--some of them without a warrant.
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it a busman's paternity leave. British Prime Minister Tony Blair says that when his 45-year-old wife, Cherie Booth, gives birth to their fourth child next month, he will go into "holiday mode" for a time, canceling public engagements but otherwise running the country. Any parent knows that having a newborn is no holiday, so Blair's announcement Sunday sounded a little implausible. Like having your baby and sleeping too. Or like taking paternity leave and not taking it.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 |
Britain is ruling today whether it will free former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet on medical grounds or bow to demands by four European states that he should face a torture trial. British newspapers reported that the 84-year-old general was likely to be freed from 16 months of house arrest, splashing headlines such as "Pinochet Prepares to Fly Home."
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The government will establish a $40-million fund to compensate victims of Nazi persecution whose assets were seized by Britain during World War II, Trade and Industry Secretary Peter Mandelson said. Britain's 1939 Trading With the Enemy Act sought to stop "belligerent countries" from using property belonging to their nationals to finance Hitler's war effort. However, innocent victims, including many Jews who had sent cash and valuables to Britain for safekeeping, also had their assets seized.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | Reuters
Britain has secretly granted political asylum to five Chinese dissidents recently based in Hong Kong, said the Independent on Sunday newspaper. One was a student leader of the 1989 pro-democracy movement. "The five--three men and two women, all thought to be in their late 20s--were involved in the pro-democracy movement which culminated in the Tiananmen Square massacre," the paper said.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as Protestant and Roman Catholic leaders traded blame Saturday for the breakdown of their 72-day-old power-sharing government, Northern Ireland remained calm and even modestly optimistic about the survival of its battered peace process.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They clung to their claret-colored benches for months, threatened to disrupt Britain's upper house of Parliament like football hooligans and cried "treason." But in the end, Britain's aristocrats accepted their fate Tuesday and agreed to abolish the centuries-old right of more than 700 hereditary peers to sit and vote in the House of Lords.
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