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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government on Wednesday banned the drug Halcion, the world's most widely prescribed sleeping pill. Halcion, and other medicines containing triazolam, have been associated with psychological side effects, particularly memory loss and depression, an announcement from the Department of Health said.
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NEWS
April 26, 2001 | From Reuters
Britain battled on new fronts in the foot-and-mouth crisis Wednesday as news that humans may have been infected sparked fresh health worries and dealt a blow to a campaign to woo back nervous tourists. Health officials were investigating two more suspected cases of human infection, 24 hours after a slaughterhouse worker who was sprayed with the entrails from a burst animal carcass became the first suspected victim of the disease here in 34 years. Test results are not expected before next week.
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NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Horse racing was canceled throughout Britain, a major international rugby match was called off and the government extended restrictions on the movement of livestock as fears about the impact of foot-and-mouth disease mounted Tuesday. Outbreaks of the highly contagious livestock ailment were identified at six new sites, bringing the number of locations where cases had been confirmed to 18.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain mobilized troops against the foot-and-mouth epidemic that has swept through its farms. Prime Minister Tony Blair, worried that the virulent disease was harming the nation's image and slashing tourist income, sent in troops to help tackle the virus and launched a global charm offensive to reassure potential visitors. About 200 soldiers began work in Devon in southwestern England and Cumbria in the northwest to help cope with the slaughter and disposal of thousands of animals.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | From Reuters
Britain battled on new fronts in the foot-and-mouth crisis Wednesday as news that humans may have been infected sparked fresh health worries and dealt a blow to a campaign to woo back nervous tourists. Health officials were investigating two more suspected cases of human infection, 24 hours after a slaughterhouse worker who was sprayed with the entrails from a burst animal carcass became the first suspected victim of the disease here in 34 years. Test results are not expected before next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2001
More than one in four people in Britain who need surgery to reopen or bypass clogged heart arteries do not get it, according to a report in today's New England Journal of Medicine by Dr. Harry Hemingway and his colleagues at the Kensington & Chelsea and Westminster Health Authority. The results may apply equally in the United States, Hemingway said.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Dramatically escalating its bid to stop the wildfire spread of foot-and-mouth disease, Britain announced plans Thursday to slaughter up to 100,000 animals that may have come in contact with the virus--in addition to more than 200,000 sheep, cows and pigs already killed or marked for death. The drastic move, announced by Agriculture Minister Nick Brown, came as reverberations of the nearly month-old outbreak rippled far beyond British shores.
NEWS
March 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Fears of "mad cow disease" spread around the globe, with South Africa, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea joining most of Britain's European Union partners in banning imports of British beef. In London, steak restaurants were deserts of empty booths after the announcement by scientists that they had found a possible link between "mad cow disease" from British beef and an incurable brain disorder in humans.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Upjohn to Fight UK Ban on Halcion: Upjohn Co. said it will fight a ban on sales of its sleeping drug Halcion in the United Kingdom. The sale of Halcion tablets has been suspended as of today by order of the Committee on Safety of Medicines, a regulatory authority. The committee said it has received incomplete information about the safety of the drug. Upjohn failed in an attempt to block the suspension, and the agency gave Upjohn until Nov. 8 to appeal the ruling.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | From Reuters
Edwina Currie, the junior health minister who sparked a major controversy by saying most of Britain's eggs were contaminated, resigned Friday. A government spokesman said Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher accepted the 42-year-old politician's resignation with "great personal sadness." Currie said in a television interview two weeks ago that most of Britain's eggs were infected with salmonella bacteria, which causes food poisoning.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
As foot-and-mouth continued to spread across Britain, the government found itself caught between a tourist industry desperate to draw visitors back to the countryside and farmers angry that thousands of healthy animals are to be killed. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals joined mounting opposition to the slaughter, which would include healthy sheep and pigs within two miles of some infected sites.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Dramatically escalating its bid to stop the wildfire spread of foot-and-mouth disease, Britain announced plans Thursday to slaughter up to 100,000 animals that may have come in contact with the virus--in addition to more than 200,000 sheep, cows and pigs already killed or marked for death. The drastic move, announced by Agriculture Minister Nick Brown, came as reverberations of the nearly month-old outbreak rippled far beyond British shores.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Foot-and-mouth disease proved the great leveler Saturday as the Queen Mother joined thousands of horse racing fans in sloshing across a disinfectant mat on her way to a day at the races. The 100-year-old royal matriarch joined crowds at Sandown Park, near London, to watch two of her horses compete. Racing resumed Wednesday in Britain after a weeklong suspension because of the outbreak of the highly infectious livestock ailment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2001
More than one in four people in Britain who need surgery to reopen or bypass clogged heart arteries do not get it, according to a report in today's New England Journal of Medicine by Dr. Harry Hemingway and his colleagues at the Kensington & Chelsea and Westminster Health Authority. The results may apply equally in the United States, Hemingway said.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Horse racing was canceled throughout Britain, a major international rugby match was called off and the government extended restrictions on the movement of livestock as fears about the impact of foot-and-mouth disease mounted Tuesday. Outbreaks of the highly contagious livestock ailment were identified at six new sites, bringing the number of locations where cases had been confirmed to 18.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
Workers began slaughtering thousands of British pigs, sheep and cattle Saturday, as the government said its measures to contain an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease appeared to be paying off. The animals were being killed on six farms where the disease had been confirmed and at two others that had contact with the infected sites, chief veterinary officer Jim Scudamore said. The carcasses were to be burned to keep the risk of transmission to a minimum.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A six-year study of more than 5,000 British doctors published Friday found no evidence that men who take aspirin daily can reduce their risk of heart attacks. The finding appears to contradict a study of about 22,000 U.S. doctors reported this week that suggests aspirin taken every other day can cut the risk of heart attack by as much as 47%. But because the British study involved fewer participants, the British researchers conceded that the U.S. study might carry greater weight.
NEWS
May 8, 1988
An outbreak of legionnaire's disease at the British Broadcasting Corp.'s headquarters in London has increased to 19 confirmed cases and 45 suspected cases, the BBC said. Forty-one people are hospitalized, nine in serious condition, a BBC spokeswoman said. Doctors said they expect more cases to develop in the next few days but believe there is no further risk of infection.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
The infant who was separated from her weaker conjoined twin sister in a 20-hour operation is making a "rapid recovery" and breathing without a ventilator, doctors said Thursday. The girl, known only as Jodie, remains in critical condition. Experts say she has a chance at a near-normal life if her progress continues. "Jodie is well and is making a rapid recovery," said a statement from St. Mary's Hospital in Manchester, where the surgery was performed Monday.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Scientists have pinpointed a highly toxic bacterium as the cause of a mysterious illness that has killed at least 35 heroin addicts, public health officials said Thursday. The source of the illness, which first emerged in Glasgow and has been found in other areas of Scotland, as well as in England and Dublin, Ireland, had baffled health chiefs for more than a month. Sixty-four infectious cases have been confirmed.
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