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NEWS
November 4, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British government illegally expelled nearly 2,000 inhabitants of the Chagos islands in the Indian Ocean at the height of the Cold War to make way for a strategic U.S. military base on Diego Garcia, the High Court ruled here Friday.
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WORLD
July 13, 2005 | John Daniszewski and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
He was British-born, the son of a Pakistani merchant who had made good in that most British of endeavors: the fish-and-chip business. But at some point, Shahzad Tanweer, named Tuesday as a suspected suicide bomber in a blast that tore apart an Underground carriage in London last week, became consumed by the rage that has swept across Europe of a new and restive generation of Islamic extremists.
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NEWS
October 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Hundreds of immigration officers at British airports and seaports dressed casually in track suits or T-shirts and jeans Friday to protest the government's refusal to pay allowances for coats and ties. The Immigration Service Union argues that if the Home Office, which is responsible for immigration affairs, "requires us to dress in a formal style, they should pay for it."
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British government illegally expelled nearly 2,000 inhabitants of the Chagos islands in the Indian Ocean at the height of the Cold War to make way for a strategic U.S. military base on Diego Garcia, the High Court ruled here Friday.
NEWS
July 22, 1987
Britain said it has found 16 alleged Nazi war criminals in the country and that they are suspected of lying to win British citizenship. The individuals were among 51 alleged war criminals listed as being in Britain by Scottish Television and the Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center. A Foreign Office spokeswoman declined to identify the 16. She added that six people on the lists have died and that the others have not been traced.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House of Commons approved a controversial bill to give British passports and citizenship to an estimated 225,000 residents of Hong Kong. The bill would give right of residency to 50,000 heads of households and their families before Hong Kong is handed over to China in 1997. About 3.25 million Hong Kong Chinese now hold a special category of British passport that does not confer right of residency in Britain.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Britain has staked out a tough line against Afghans seeking asylum after a hijacking, but it could be months before a final decision. Afghanistan warned Friday that the hijackers could face death if they returned. After a standoff ended early Thursday at London's Stansted Airport, 74 of the freed hostages--almost half--requested asylum. Police have arrested 22 people who will likely face trial in Britain. The rest are still considering their options.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
With pressure mounting on Britain to open its doors to the increasingly jittery people of Hong Kong, British Foreign Secretary Geoffrey Howe disclosed Monday that London is drawing up plans to take in a small portion of the colony's population.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Facing their last chance to apply for British passports, about 16,000 people lined up outside the immigration office, anxious to get British documents before Hong Kong reverts to Chinese rule. Britain's 155-year government of Hong Kong doesn't expire until June 30, 1997. But anticipating a rush, the British government set a deadline of midnight tonight for Hong Kong residents to get travel papers.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The House of Commons approved legislation Thursday to allow 50,000 heads of households from Hong Kong and their families to enter Britain when the colony is handed back to China in 1997. Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd has said he wants key people to remain in Hong Kong after Chinese rule. He says the best way to achieve that is to guarantee them a British passport so they know they can always leave.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Britain has staked out a tough line against Afghans seeking asylum after a hijacking, but it could be months before a final decision. Afghanistan warned Friday that the hijackers could face death if they returned. After a standoff ended early Thursday at London's Stansted Airport, 74 of the freed hostages--almost half--requested asylum. Police have arrested 22 people who will likely face trial in Britain. The rest are still considering their options.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with the tourists and traders speeding in air-conditioned comfort through the Channel Tunnel linking Britain and the rest of Europe, increasing numbers of undocumented immigrants are arriving in London seeking political asylum. The traffic is orchestrated, British officials say, by legally savvy and technologically sophisticated people movers--a tony European version of the "coyotes" who work the Rio Grande.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Facing their last chance to apply for British passports, about 16,000 people lined up outside the immigration office, anxious to get British documents before Hong Kong reverts to Chinese rule. Britain's 155-year government of Hong Kong doesn't expire until June 30, 1997. But anticipating a rush, the British government set a deadline of midnight tonight for Hong Kong residents to get travel papers.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative Member of Parliament Winston Churchill, grandson and namesake of Britain's wartime prime minister, set off a public outcry Saturday by calling for an urgent halt to the "relentless flow" of immigrants into Britain. Addressing a Conservative Party gathering in northern England, Churchill said that the British way of life and liberal democracy are threatened by immigration, particularly from the Indian subcontinent.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | Times Wire Service s
China denounced as "unacceptable" Saturday a British law granting passports and the right of abode in Britain to 50,000 key Hong Kong Chinese families and said it will not recognize the "erroneous action." China's vow of non-recognition appeared designed to undermine a key aim of the British Nationality Act, passed by the Parliament last week as a safety valve to give some key Hong Kong residents the confidence to stay in the territory after the colony reverts to Chinese rule in 1997.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of Hong Kong residents, worried about their future after China's takeover in 1997, flooded the Immigration Department on Wednesday, the last day to apply for a special program to emigrate to Britain. More than 18,000 heads of households submitted applications for the nationality package by 12:30 this morning when police clanged shut a portable gate 30 minutes after the deadline.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | Times Wire Service s
China denounced as "unacceptable" Saturday a British law granting passports and the right of abode in Britain to 50,000 key Hong Kong Chinese families and said it will not recognize the "erroneous action." China's vow of non-recognition appeared designed to undermine a key aim of the British Nationality Act, passed by the Parliament last week as a safety valve to give some key Hong Kong residents the confidence to stay in the territory after the colony reverts to Chinese rule in 1997.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent effort to regain international financial support, the Chinese government Monday permitted Fang Lizhi, the country's leading dissident, and his wife to leave their yearlong confinement inside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing and fly to freedom and a new academic job in Britain. A U.S. Air Force C-135, specially dispatched from Japan, picked up Fang and his wife, Li Shuxian, in Beijing and took them to London.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The House of Commons approved legislation Thursday to allow 50,000 heads of households from Hong Kong and their families to enter Britain when the colony is handed back to China in 1997. Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd has said he wants key people to remain in Hong Kong after Chinese rule. He says the best way to achieve that is to guarantee them a British passport so they know they can always leave.
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