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NEWS
April 19, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
It's been 28 years since the last of the town's four coal mines closed, yet powerful memories linger of a life where young boys joined their fathers "down the pits" and the community shared its hardships as one. "There was a love-hate relationship with the mines," recalled Ted Griffiths, a burly miner's son, as he sipped his beer at the Tylorstown Workingman's Club. "Men didn't want their kids going down, but the camaraderie was so strong, they wouldn't give it up themselves."
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NEWS
October 19, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rover Group's four-wheel-drive automobile factory in suburban Solihull represents Britain's economic hope: The high-tech plant is churning out an array of off-road vehicles, from the upscale Range Rover to the new smaller, lighter Freelander. But 12 miles away, Rover's Longbridge family-car plant represents reality: employment and production cutbacks. They are hallmarks of a recession in manufacturing that many here fear will affect the rest of the British economy.
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NEWS
September 30, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Metrication is coming! Metrication is coming! Britain lurches measurably closer to Europe this weekend when packaged food officially sheds ounces and pounds and acquires grams and kilos. It's the latest chapter in a phased switch from old-fashioned, American-friendly imperial measurements to the metric standard of Britain's partners in the European Community--and most of the rest of the world. Britain's defection means that the United States will soon be almost alone in the yard.
NEWS
September 30, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Metrication is coming! Metrication is coming! Britain lurches measurably closer to Europe this weekend when packaged food officially sheds ounces and pounds and acquires grams and kilos. It's the latest chapter in a phased switch from old-fashioned, American-friendly imperial measurements to the metric standard of Britain's partners in the European Community--and most of the rest of the world. Britain's defection means that the United States will soon be almost alone in the yard.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on Thursday submitted legislation to sell the electricity monopoly, a sale three times larger than previous steps in her campaign to dispose of nationalized industries. Financial analysts have said the sale of the power generating and distribution system in England and Wales, to be completed by mid-1991, may be worth anywhere from $30 billion to $50 billion. Two separate companies will be set up in Scotland, while Northern Ireland is not affected.
NEWS
May 27, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The threat is to the very fabric of society, the British are warned. The mass media are up in arms, members of Parliament in revolt. At issue is something as vital as politics or religion: that unique British institution known as the public house, or pub. "An Englishman's pub is his castle," the conservative Daily Telegraph thundered. "It is one thing for the government to tangle with the bar or the doctors, but if it upsets the nation's drinkers, its goose will be well and truly cooked."
NEWS
October 19, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rover Group's four-wheel-drive automobile factory in suburban Solihull represents Britain's economic hope: The high-tech plant is churning out an array of off-road vehicles, from the upscale Range Rover to the new smaller, lighter Freelander. But 12 miles away, Rover's Longbridge family-car plant represents reality: employment and production cutbacks. They are hallmarks of a recession in manufacturing that many here fear will affect the rest of the British economy.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | United Press International
The Conservative Party, trying to remain in power through the 1990s, vowed Wednesday to denationalize Britain's coal industry--once virtually ruled by the miners' union. On the second day of their annual convention, the Tories also called for a "national crusade against crime" with many speakers asking for a restoration of the death penalty during a lively debate.
NEWS
January 3, 1987 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, Times International Economics Correspondent
"What are you doing in Britain?" asked John Harvey-Jones, chairman of Imperial Chemical Industries, the nation's largest manufacturing corporation. "Looking at the British economy," his American visitor replied. Harvey-Jones smiled. "Looking at it?" he asked. "Or looking for it?" Gallows humor fills the air in Britain these days. The ruling Conservative Party boasts that the country on the whole has never lived so well. The opposition scoffs that at least 11.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An explosion and fire did not just level most of the Malden Mills textile factory in Methuen, Mass. It destroyed a near-miraculous success story of the New England textile industry. It threatened the supply of fleecy Polartec fabric to customers such as L.L. Bean--and it put at least 1,400 people out of work just before Christmas. Four of the five buildings in the complex were reduced to smoking piles of brick, wood and metal. Thirty-three people were injured, eight critically.
NEWS
May 27, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The threat is to the very fabric of society, the British are warned. The mass media are up in arms, members of Parliament in revolt. At issue is something as vital as politics or religion: that unique British institution known as the public house, or pub. "An Englishman's pub is his castle," the conservative Daily Telegraph thundered. "It is one thing for the government to tangle with the bar or the doctors, but if it upsets the nation's drinkers, its goose will be well and truly cooked."
BUSINESS
December 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on Thursday submitted legislation to sell the electricity monopoly, a sale three times larger than previous steps in her campaign to dispose of nationalized industries. Financial analysts have said the sale of the power generating and distribution system in England and Wales, to be completed by mid-1991, may be worth anywhere from $30 billion to $50 billion. Two separate companies will be set up in Scotland, while Northern Ireland is not affected.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | United Press International
The Conservative Party, trying to remain in power through the 1990s, vowed Wednesday to denationalize Britain's coal industry--once virtually ruled by the miners' union. On the second day of their annual convention, the Tories also called for a "national crusade against crime" with many speakers asking for a restoration of the death penalty during a lively debate.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
It's been 28 years since the last of the town's four coal mines closed, yet powerful memories linger of a life where young boys joined their fathers "down the pits" and the community shared its hardships as one. "There was a love-hate relationship with the mines," recalled Ted Griffiths, a burly miner's son, as he sipped his beer at the Tylorstown Workingman's Club. "Men didn't want their kids going down, but the camaraderie was so strong, they wouldn't give it up themselves."
NEWS
January 3, 1987 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, Times International Economics Correspondent
"What are you doing in Britain?" asked John Harvey-Jones, chairman of Imperial Chemical Industries, the nation's largest manufacturing corporation. "Looking at the British economy," his American visitor replied. Harvey-Jones smiled. "Looking at it?" he asked. "Or looking for it?" Gallows humor fills the air in Britain these days. The ruling Conservative Party boasts that the country on the whole has never lived so well. The opposition scoffs that at least 11.
SPORTS
August 4, 2005 | Dan Arritt
Jamie Bestwick is one of the most well-known athletes living in State College, Pa., though you'll never see him in a Penn State uniform. Bestwick, 34, is a two-time X Games gold medalist in the BMX freestyle vert competition. Raised in Riddings, England, he moved to State College in 1998 to pursue a career as a BMX rider. State College is home to Woodward Camp, a state-of-the-art BMX training facility that features 17 parks.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | JONATHAN YENKIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In June, 1988, U.S. Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke told banks that aggressive uncontrolled expansion can lead to deep trouble. "Growth for growth's sake, or growth without the resources to back it up, is a highly risky strategy because it leaves the bank exposed when the economy turns down," he said.
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