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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1997
Longshore workers at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles joined other West Coast dockworkers Monday in an eight-hour work stoppage to show solidarity with dockworkers in Liverpool, England. Members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, Locals 13 and 63, refused to work between 6 p.m. Monday and 2 a.m. today, demanding the reinstatement of Liverpool dockworkers who were fired during a work dispute two years ago.
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TRAVEL
April 1, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
In 1830, 16-year-old Sarah Hodgdon, a millworker in Lowell, Mass., wrote these sweet lines to her parents back home in New Hampshire: I wish you well from all my heart, Although we are so far apart. If you die there and I die here, Before one God we shall appear. She was one of thousands of young women who left farms and families in the New England countryside between 1825 and 1850 to work in the new water-powered mills of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine.
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NEWS
December 2, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been more than two years since 36-year-old Ferdi Rutenfrans lost his last paying job, cataloguing books at the Amsterdam public library. "I wasn't exactly fired," he said. But he didn't exactly quit either. He chafed under what he calls the library's "hierarchical" organization. "I had words with my employer," and the next thing he knew he had joined the sizable ranks of the Dutch unemployed.
NEWS
October 19, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rover Group's four-wheel-drive automobile factory in suburban Solihull represents Britain's economic hope: The high-tech plant is churning out an array of off-road vehicles, from the upscale Range Rover to the new smaller, lighter Freelander. But 12 miles away, Rover's Longbridge family-car plant represents reality: employment and production cutbacks. They are hallmarks of a recession in manufacturing that many here fear will affect the rest of the British economy.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A combination of World Cup fever and a public transportation strike brought the British capital close to a standstill on a day that had been dubbed "Idle Monday" before it even began. In thin, cold rain, the streets here were clogged with cars, taxis and sodden pedestrians under umbrellas, as tens of thousands of people unable to get to work on the strike-bound subway trudged toward offices. But many more did not bother.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
British Unemployment Dives, Inflation Rises: Government figures show that seasonally adjusted unemployment dived by 54,600 in December to 2.4 million, or 8.6% of the work force, from 8.8% in November. Unemployment has fallen for 11 months in a row and now stands at its lowest level in three years. But the good news on jobs was marred by a surprisingly large increase in inflation. Inflation year-over-year rose to 2.9% in December. It was 2.6% in November.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a politically embarrassing about-face, the British government declared Monday that last week's announced closing of more than half of the nation's coal mines will be partially rescinded. The original decision to close 31 out of 50 mines, at the cost of 30,000 miners' jobs, had provoked a firestorm of public and political outrage nationwide.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A combination of World Cup fever and a public transportation strike brought the British capital close to a standstill on a day that had been dubbed "Idle Monday" before it even began. In thin, cold rain, the streets here were clogged with cars, taxis and sodden pedestrians under umbrellas, as tens of thousands of people unable to get to work on the strike-bound subway trudged toward offices. But many more did not bother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1997
Longshore workers at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles joined other West Coast dockworkers Monday in an eight-hour work stoppage to show solidarity with dockworkers in Liverpool, England. Members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, Locals 13 and 63, refused to work between 6 p.m. Monday and 2 a.m. today, demanding the reinstatement of Liverpool dockworkers who were fired during a work dispute two years ago.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Demonstrators marching in support of fired dockworkers threw bottles, paint and an orange smoke bomb at police guarding the entrance to Downing Street, where Prime Minister John Major has his official residence. Dozens of police donned riot gear to protect themselves, and many officers were splattered with paint, but the demonstrators did not penetrate the metal gates at the street's entrance. Major was away campaigning for the May 1 general election.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
British Unemployment Dives, Inflation Rises: Government figures show that seasonally adjusted unemployment dived by 54,600 in December to 2.4 million, or 8.6% of the work force, from 8.8% in November. Unemployment has fallen for 11 months in a row and now stands at its lowest level in three years. But the good news on jobs was marred by a surprisingly large increase in inflation. Inflation year-over-year rose to 2.9% in December. It was 2.6% in November.
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest mass demonstration in years tied up central London on Sunday as an estimated 150,000 people turned out in support of threatened British miners. In driving rain, a well-behaved crowd formed behind colliery brass bands parading through the capital in a march that protested not only the government's announced closure of 31 mines but also the faltering economy.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a politically embarrassing about-face, the British government declared Monday that last week's announced closing of more than half of the nation's coal mines will be partially rescinded. The original decision to close 31 out of 50 mines, at the cost of 30,000 miners' jobs, had provoked a firestorm of public and political outrage nationwide.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1988 | From Reuters
Workers at Britain's Ford factories voted overwhelmingly Thursday to end an 11-day strike that has threatened production across Europe and cost the company $990 million, a Ford spokesman said. He said unofficial results from nearly all the 22 plants showed 70% had voted to accept a pay package to boost wages by 14% over two years. The 32,500 car makers return to work Monday.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronting huge stockpiles and dwindling demand, the once-mighty British coal industry announced Tuesday that it will close 31 pits and eliminate a staggering 30,000 jobs--75% of the nation's miners. The sweeping cuts--which will be felt nationwide with full force within months, although officials have promised to assist miners as much as possible during the transition--leave only 19 working mines in a previously powerful industry.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | From Associated Press
U.S. workers are more productive than their German or Japanese counterparts, largely because of America's highly competitive and open trade environment, a new study said Tuesday. American workers are 11% more productive than West German workers and 23% more productive than Japanese workers, said William Lewis, director of the McKinsey Global Institute, which sponsored the study of five big industrial nations.
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