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NEWS
April 20, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British government moved Thursday to ease public fears about new gene technologies by announcing plans to outlaw human reproductive cloning and steps to prevent insurance companies from using genetic tests to limit coverage. At the same time, genetic tests for diseases such as breast cancer are to be made more readily available through the National Health Service.
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NEWS
August 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan won his appeal Tuesday against a government ban preventing him from visiting Britain. Justice Michael Turner did not immediately disclose his reasoning in overturning the ban, imposed by former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's government in 1986. The judge said he would give his reasons Oct. 1, and he prohibited Farrakhan, a Chicago-based activist, from entering Britain until that time.
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NEWS
March 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
To the relief of thousands of pet owners, Britain is dropping its severe quarantine laws for eligible animals arriving from other rabies-free countries. Instead of spending six months in a kennel, each eligible animal will have to qualify for a kind of "pet passport" with blood tests, a vaccination against rabies and the insertion of an identification microchip under the skin.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | LAUREL ROSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan has asked Britain's High Court to lift a 15-year ban on his entry into the country, arguing that it violates his right to freedom of expression. Successive British governments have excluded Farrakhan out of fear that he would incite racial unrest. Upholding the ban last November, then-Home Secretary Jack Straw said Farrakhan's "anti-Semitic and racially divisive views" could harm community relations.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | United Press International
Britain plans to scrap its quaint liquor law dating from World War I that requires English and Welsh pubs to close in the afternoon, the government announced Wednesday. "The time has come for the law to be brought up to date," Home Secretary Douglas Hurd said. A government-supported bill on extended pub hours will be announced today at the state opening of the newly elected Parliament, officials said. "Cheers!" headlined the Evening Standard on the liquor news.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a spectacle as old as Britain's democracy and as contemporary as strategic arms talks, Queen Elizabeth II outlined an ambitious and controversial legislative agenda here Tuesday as she formally opened a new term of Parliament.
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reclusive farmer convicted of fatally shooting a 16-year-old burglar in the back with an illegal shotgun has become the unlikely poster boy for victims' rights in Britain. Tony Martin, who lived in a rundown Victorian estate called Bleak House and carried a teddy bear to court every day, received a mandatory sentence of life in prison last week for the killing. One of the dead intruder's accomplices was jailed for three years, the other for 2 1/2 years.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
In a landmark judgment for same-sex couples, Britain's highest court ruled Thursday that a gay man is entitled to remain in the state-subsidized apartment leased by his dead partner--a right restricted by law to spouses or "family" members. In a 3-2 ruling, a House of Lords judicial panel said that Martin Fitzpatrick, who lived with John Thompson for more than 20 years in a monogamous relationship, was entitled to take over the lease of an apartment that was in Thompson's name.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
British antitrust authorities said they may investigate a proposed alliance between British Airways and American Airlines Inc. because they consider it a merger under British law. News of Britain's interest came as British and U.S. negotiators said they plan on Monday to reopen informal talks about the alliance as they try again to work out a new "open skies" treaty between the two nations. A treaty is a precondition for the alliance, which would be the biggest in a series of links among U.S.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Court Bars Bank Takeover of Thrift: The British High Court blocked Lloyds Bank's proposed $2.66-billion takeover of Cheltenham & Gloucester Building Society, thus stopping what would have been the first merger of a British bank and thrift. The court ruled that Lloyds' plan to give cash payments to people holding accounts with Cheltenham & Gloucester for less than two years violated the Building Societies Act of 1986, which governs the thrift industry.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British government moved Thursday to ease public fears about new gene technologies by announcing plans to outlaw human reproductive cloning and steps to prevent insurance companies from using genetic tests to limit coverage. At the same time, genetic tests for diseases such as breast cancer are to be made more readily available through the National Health Service.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although soapbox orators have made Speaker's Corner a symbol of free speech for much of the world, their right to hold forth in Hyde Park is not explicitly guaranteed in British law. Similarly, Britain has no equivalent of the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent. Prosecutors have been allowed to introduce illegally obtained evidence in British trials, and police entrapment is not accepted as a defense in court.
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reclusive farmer convicted of fatally shooting a 16-year-old burglar in the back with an illegal shotgun has become the unlikely poster boy for victims' rights in Britain. Tony Martin, who lived in a rundown Victorian estate called Bleak House and carried a teddy bear to court every day, received a mandatory sentence of life in prison last week for the killing. One of the dead intruder's accomplices was jailed for three years, the other for 2 1/2 years.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
On June 7, 1982, a heroin addict in his early 30s named Michael Fagan--later diagnosed by British doctors as schizophrenic and having suicidal tendencies--scaled a railing at Buckingham Palace, climbed up a drainpipe and entered a third-floor window. Fagan found a bottle of Australian wine given as a gift to the Prince of Wales. He drank half of it. A maid suddenly spotted him in a hallway and called security guards. By the time they got there, Fagan was gone.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
In a landmark judgment for same-sex couples, Britain's highest court ruled Thursday that a gay man is entitled to remain in the state-subsidized apartment leased by his dead partner--a right restricted by law to spouses or "family" members. In a 3-2 ruling, a House of Lords judicial panel said that Martin Fitzpatrick, who lived with John Thompson for more than 20 years in a monogamous relationship, was entitled to take over the lease of an apartment that was in Thompson's name.
NEWS
April 1, 1999 | Associated Press
The House of Lords reluctantly passed a bill Wednesday stripping aristocrats who hold inherited seats from voting in the upper chamber of Parliament. But that didn't stop some peers from considering a legal challenge to the plan. The Lords passed the bill in the early hours after a marathon debate but attached an amendment expressing reservations concerning the Labor government's plan to modernize the 800-year-old nonelected chamber.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Britain, Sunday once was sacrosanct. There were restrictions on the operation of shops, movie theaters, pubs, restaurants, sports events. The rules narrowed the options of people here on Sundays to churchgoing, prayer-reading, long walks and dining on the traditional roast meat, often with relatives. But Britain's blue laws are going the way of bowler hats and winning cricket teams--much to the delight of a large majority of the populace.
NEWS
September 26, 1997
Britain's press watchdog, the Press Complaints Commission, on Thursday outlined a new code of practice and urged the nation's media to adopt the tougher voluntary guidelines. The revisions, prompted by the death of Princess Diana, cover the following five main points: HARASSMENT * Ban publication of pictures obtained through "persistent pursuit" or "unlawful behavior." * Make editors check how freelance material was obtained. * Encourage photo agencies to follow the code of practice.
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
To the relief of thousands of pet owners, Britain is dropping its severe quarantine laws for eligible animals arriving from other rabies-free countries. Instead of spending six months in a kennel, each eligible animal will have to qualify for a kind of "pet passport" with blood tests, a vaccination against rabies and the insertion of an identification microchip under the skin.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
A quarter-million people poured into London on Sunday to protest a government they say threatens their rural way of life. From the grouse moors of Scotland and the green valleys of Wales and England, landowners and laborers, fox hunters and their opponents brought their diverse grievances to the capital in Britain's largest single demonstration since antinuclear marches in the early 1980s.
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