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England Military Bases Northern Ireland

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NEWS
October 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility for bombing Britain's army headquarters in Northern Ireland and demanded that London invite the IRA's Sinn Fein political wing to peace talks. "The resolution of the conflict demands an inclusive negotiated settlement. This is not possible unless and until the British government faces up to its responsibilities," the IRA said in a statement to Irish state broadcaster RTE.
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NEWS
April 7, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A small bomb exploded at a British army base in Northern Ireland six days before Queen Elizabeth II is to visit Belfast, the provincial capital. No one was hurt in the early morning blast at the perimeter of the Ebrington Barracks in the city of Londonderry. It was the second bomb attack on an army base in the British province in six weeks.
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NEWS
March 13, 1989
Army bomb disposal experts defused a 1,500-pound IRA bomb planted near a British military base in Northern Ireland, police said. It took nearly 12 hours to defuse the bomb, which was in a stolen van near the base in Castlederg, near the western border with the Irish Republic. "There's no doubt that it was the IRA," a police spokesman said of the outlawed Irish Republican Army, which is seeking to drive the British out of Northern Ireland.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | From Reuters
Security forces found a 1,000-pound bomb near a British army base Saturday and suspect it was planted by the Irish Republican Army to grab headlines ahead of British elections. The device was found on a road between Clough and Ballykinlar, site of a major British army base in County Down, southeast of Belfast. It was left by the roadside in an apparently aborted attempt to blow up passing security force vehicles.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A small bomb exploded at a British army base in Northern Ireland six days before Queen Elizabeth II is to visit Belfast, the provincial capital. No one was hurt in the early morning blast at the perimeter of the Ebrington Barracks in the city of Londonderry. It was the second bomb attack on an army base in the British province in six weeks.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two terrorist car bombs exploded Monday at the largest British military base in Northern Ireland in an attack that may sound the death knell for struggling peace talks between Protestants and Roman Catholics in the divided province. The British army reported that 20 soldiers and 11 civilian workers were injured in the blasts, a handful of them seriously. The bombs exploded a few minutes apart near nightfall.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | From Reuters
Security forces found a 1,000-pound bomb near a British army base Saturday and suspect it was planted by the Irish Republican Army to grab headlines ahead of British elections. The device was found on a road between Clough and Ballykinlar, site of a major British army base in County Down, southeast of Belfast. It was left by the roadside in an apparently aborted attempt to blow up passing security force vehicles.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Detectives interrogated a Belfast man in connection with an Irish Republican Army attack on the British army's regional headquarters that returned bombing to Northern Ireland. Police arrested the man after the Thiepval barracks were struck Monday by two car bombs that injured 31 people. The suspect can be held for up to a week without being charged.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Detectives interrogated a Belfast man in connection with an Irish Republican Army attack on the British army's regional headquarters that returned bombing to Northern Ireland. Police arrested the man after the Thiepval barracks were struck Monday by two car bombs that injured 31 people. The suspect can be held for up to a week without being charged.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility for bombing Britain's army headquarters in Northern Ireland and demanded that London invite the IRA's Sinn Fein political wing to peace talks. "The resolution of the conflict demands an inclusive negotiated settlement. This is not possible unless and until the British government faces up to its responsibilities," the IRA said in a statement to Irish state broadcaster RTE.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two terrorist car bombs exploded Monday at the largest British military base in Northern Ireland in an attack that may sound the death knell for struggling peace talks between Protestants and Roman Catholics in the divided province. The British army reported that 20 soldiers and 11 civilian workers were injured in the blasts, a handful of them seriously. The bombs exploded a few minutes apart near nightfall.
NEWS
March 13, 1989
Army bomb disposal experts defused a 1,500-pound IRA bomb planted near a British military base in Northern Ireland, police said. It took nearly 12 hours to defuse the bomb, which was in a stolen van near the base in Castlederg, near the western border with the Irish Republic. "There's no doubt that it was the IRA," a police spokesman said of the outlawed Irish Republican Army, which is seeking to drive the British out of Northern Ireland.
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