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NEWS
November 25, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's Conservative Party, torn by the self-inflicted loss of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, saw its fortunes soar Saturday as soundings indicated that any of the three candidates for party leader would run ahead of the Labor Party if national elections were held today.
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NEWS
June 7, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's opposition Labor Party, once nearly moribund, has come back to life with unexpected zest, leaving the governing Conservatives in a dither. In recent samplings, several public opinion polls have shown the Labor Party running six to eight percentage points ahead of the Tories, a lead that Labor is maintaining. Just a couple of months ago, when questioners asked which party would be favored in a national election, the answers put the Conservatives clearly in front.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"A woman in mourning" was the way the headline summed up a recent profile of Margaret Thatcher as she prepared to visit Los Angeles--her first overseas trip since she resigned as Britain's prime minister in November. The designation seems apt, for observers used to her fighting, feisty style as the nation's leader and who have seen her at social gatherings say that she now seems somewhat "diminished." During 11 years in power, she presented a formidable facade in public and private.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's journalists swapped angry charges Sunday over their coverage and commentaries on the Persian Gulf War. The media war pitted newspapers and commentators who supported the allied war effort against those who had cautioned against a military attack, and the hawks accused the "naysayers" of ignorance or naivete or, in some cases, of being outright propagandists.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ruling Conservative Party is undergoing a wrenching argument--once again--over the degree of Britain's commitment to the European Community and its plans for political union. The fight pits the Tory party's moderate, pro-Europe wing led by Prime Minister John Major, against the Thatcherites, followers of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who oppose closer EC political union.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Opposition leader Neil Kinnock said Tuesday that Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher is "out of touch, out of date, and out of step with the British people" and that his newly moderate Labor Party is now "fit to serve our country." Kinnock delivered what colleagues said was perhaps his most important speech at the Labor Party's annual conference at this beach resort on England's south coast.
NEWS
October 14, 1989
Michael Foot, the fiery socialist orator who led Britain's opposition Labor Party to its worst defeat in 60 years, said Friday he will retire from Parliament at the next general election. Foot, a left-wing idealist, led Labor for three years. But he was unable to unite the party's warring factions and lost to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the 1983 election.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
The Conservative Party of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, whose ratings have plummeted in opinion polls, opened its annual conference in the northern English resort of Blackpool. With Britain's grim economic situation dominating the meeting, party officials defended their beleaguered finance minister, Nigel Lawson. Party Chairman Kenneth Baker opened the session by supporting Lawson and sought to boost morale with a fierce attack on the opposition Labor Party.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although soapbox orators have made Speaker's Corner a symbol of free speech for much of the world, their right to hold forth in Hyde Park is not explicitly guaranteed in British law. Similarly, Britain has no equivalent of the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent. Prosecutors have been allowed to introduce illegally obtained evidence in British trials, and police entrapment is not accepted as a defense in court.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition leader Neil Kinnock accused Prime Minister John Major on Tuesday of being "utterly negligent" in not cracking down faster on the London operations of the scandal-racked Bank of Credit and Commerce International. In their sharpest-ever exchange, Major, his voice trembling, replied that Kinnock's remarks showed that he conducts politics "by smear" and is "unfit to be in government." As their tempers flared, the House of Commons erupted in shouts, and the Speaker pleaded for order.
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