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NEWS
November 17, 1990 | Baltimore Sun
British Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd on Friday reserved the right to enter the Tory party leadership battle if Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher falters in the first ballot Tuesday. The only challenge Thatcher faces in that vote is from former Defense Secretary Michael Heseltine, who is presenting himself as best able to ensure a Conservative victory in the next election.
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NEWS
November 3, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's Conservative Party on Friday sought to put a brave face on the resignation of Deputy Prime Minister Geoffrey Howe, leaving the party's position on joining Europe in a state of doubt and confusion. Many Conservatives believe that Howe's resignation Thursday in protest against Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's renunciation of a common European currency will seriously damage them in the next general election.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1990 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's resignation may spark short-term volatility in British markets but is unlikely to prompt big swings in U.S. financial markets, economists and dealers said Thursday. Michael Metz, stock market strategist at Oppenheimer & Co., said that if the ruling Conservative Party in Britain were unable to unite, "it could be a negative for the British market." But, he added, "it's more of an internal matter rather than one with repercussions for us." U.S.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY
Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd and treasury chief John Major jumped into the contest for Conservative Party leader against Michael Heseltine. THE OUTSIDER Michael Heseltine--Born in Wales 57 years ago, he is a self-made man who became a millionaire in publishing . . . Nicknamed "Tarzan" in the tabloids because of his height, his flowing locks and his theatrical outburst against Laborites in Parliament in 1976 . . .
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's Conservative Party, torn by the self-inflicted loss of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, saw its fortunes soar Saturday as soundings indicated that any of the three candidates for party leader would run ahead of the Labor Party if national elections were held today.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's opposition Labor Party, once nearly moribund, has come back to life with unexpected zest, leaving the governing Conservatives in a dither. In recent samplings, several public opinion polls have shown the Labor Party running six to eight percentage points ahead of the Tories, a lead that Labor is maintaining. Just a couple of months ago, when questioners asked which party would be favored in a national election, the answers put the Conservatives clearly in front.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"A woman in mourning" was the way the headline summed up a recent profile of Margaret Thatcher as she prepared to visit Los Angeles--her first overseas trip since she resigned as Britain's prime minister in November. The designation seems apt, for observers used to her fighting, feisty style as the nation's leader and who have seen her at social gatherings say that she now seems somewhat "diminished." During 11 years in power, she presented a formidable facade in public and private.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's journalists swapped angry charges Sunday over their coverage and commentaries on the Persian Gulf War. The media war pitted newspapers and commentators who supported the allied war effort against those who had cautioned against a military attack, and the hawks accused the "naysayers" of ignorance or naivete or, in some cases, of being outright propagandists.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ruling Conservative Party is undergoing a wrenching argument--once again--over the degree of Britain's commitment to the European Community and its plans for political union. The fight pits the Tory party's moderate, pro-Europe wing led by Prime Minister John Major, against the Thatcherites, followers of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who oppose closer EC political union.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Opposition leader Neil Kinnock said Tuesday that Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher is "out of touch, out of date, and out of step with the British people" and that his newly moderate Labor Party is now "fit to serve our country." Kinnock delivered what colleagues said was perhaps his most important speech at the Labor Party's annual conference at this beach resort on England's south coast.
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