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July 26, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hong Kong residents desperate to flee before China takes over in 1997, the Federal Republic of Corterra sounded perfect. The tiny Pacific island nation was described as lying between Tahiti and Hawaii, with 80,000 citizens who enjoy democratic government, a British-style legal system and no income tax. Best of all, a newspaper ad here boasted, passports are bargain-priced at only $16,000. Three local businessmen quickly paid the $5,000 application fee. Then they discovered the catch.
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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was nothing subtle about the pink pamphlets stacked neatly beside the front door to the Rev. Al Ebanks' modern church in the capital of these idyllic and conservative Caribbean islands. Homosexuals, they claimed, quoting 1 Corinthians 6: 9-10, are as "wicked" as thieves, drunkards, slanderers, swindlers and the greedy, and they most certainly shall not "inherit the kingdom of God."
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NEWS
March 4, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over British objections, the United States is selling Argentina 36 A-4 Skyhawks with advanced radar to replace some of the jet attack planes lost by the Argentines in their 1982 war against Britain over the Falkland Islands. Argentina will get the used American planes cheap--$200,000 to $300,000 each, according to one source--but it will spend hundreds of millions of dollars to have them refurbished and refitted.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over British objections, the United States is selling Argentina 36 A-4 Skyhawks with advanced radar to replace some of the jet attack planes lost by the Argentines in their 1982 war against Britain over the Falkland Islands. Argentina will get the used American planes cheap--$200,000 to $300,000 each, according to one source--but it will spend hundreds of millions of dollars to have them refurbished and refitted.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking British official to visit China since last year's crackdown on pro-democracy protests expressed hope Thursday for gradual improvement of China's relations with the West.
NEWS
January 31, 1989
Britain confirmed that it will withdraw some troops from Gibraltar but denied it is abandoning the strategic area. Defense Secretary George Younger said the move is part of a cost-cutting drive and that the troops are needed elsewhere. He said Britain's commitment to the colony is "absolute and very clear. As long as the people of Gibraltar wish it, they will remain under the British flag." Government sources said that about 650 soldiers will be pulled out over two years' time.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Angry residents Wednesday honked horns, planted Nationalist Chinese flags and demanded that Chinese leaders resign during spontaneous protests in Hong Kong against the military crackdown in Beijing. The protests broke out even though organizers canceled planned demonstrations for fear of more violence after rioters stormed Chinese banks earlier in the day. Police said five officers were injured and 15 protesters arrested. From dawn until nearly midnight, a stream of protesters converged Wednesday on China's official New China News Agency, the mainland government's de facto embassy in this British colony.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Premier Li Peng said Wednesday that China's Communist leadership is united and capable of defeating any threat to its rule, an apparent allusion to last year's huge pro-democracy protests. "The core of leadership in China, with General Secretary Jiang Zemin as the nucleus, is united, it is strong and I believe that it commands the support of the Chinese people," Li told a press conference at the Great Hall of the People.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1991 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"The Japanese are confident about Hong Kong's investment climate. The Americans are not, and the British are very scared." That's how David K. P. Li, chief executive of the Bank of East Asia, sums up foreign views of Hong Kong after the British colony reverts to Chinese sovereignty in 1997.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years after their bloody conflict over the Falkland Islands, Argentina and Britain are engaged in a painstaking dialogue that Argentines hope will lead eventually to their recovery of the disputed territory. The two countries cannot avoid a lingering aftertaste of bitterness as they mark the war's 10th anniversary. But both governments seem eager to smooth out rough spots as they negotiate patiently on new measures of accommodation and cooperation.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1991 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"The Japanese are confident about Hong Kong's investment climate. The Americans are not, and the British are very scared." That's how David K. P. Li, chief executive of the Bank of East Asia, sums up foreign views of Hong Kong after the British colony reverts to Chinese sovereignty in 1997.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Reuters
Britain was worried that Iraq might attack Kuwait 30 years ago and drew up plans to dislodge Iraqi troops from the territory, according to newly released government papers. Documents disclosed Tuesday under a 30-year secrecy rule showed that a military committee was asked to consider an operation to drive out Iraqi troops if they invaded Kuwait. Kuwait was then controlled by the British, but a coup had overthrown a pro-British regime in Baghdad.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
The largest bank in Hong Kong announced Monday that it was transferring all assets offshore, a move that would probably damage confidence in the British colony reverting to Chinese rule in 1997. Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp. Chairman William Purves said the decision reflected the bank's global reach and did not signal abandonment of the territory where it has flourished for 125 years.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking British official to visit China since last year's crackdown on pro-democracy protests expressed hope Thursday for gradual improvement of China's relations with the West.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of Hong Kong residents, worried about their future after China's takeover in 1997, flooded the Immigration Department on Wednesday, the last day to apply for a special program to emigrate to Britain. More than 18,000 heads of households submitted applications for the nationality package by 12:30 this morning when police clanged shut a portable gate 30 minutes after the deadline.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hong Kong residents desperate to flee before China takes over in 1997, the Federal Republic of Corterra sounded perfect. The tiny Pacific island nation was described as lying between Tahiti and Hawaii, with 80,000 citizens who enjoy democratic government, a British-style legal system and no income tax. Best of all, a newspaper ad here boasted, passports are bargain-priced at only $16,000. Three local businessmen quickly paid the $5,000 application fee. Then they discovered the catch.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Premier Li Peng said Wednesday that China's Communist leadership is united and capable of defeating any threat to its rule, an apparent allusion to last year's huge pro-democracy protests. "The core of leadership in China, with General Secretary Jiang Zemin as the nucleus, is united, it is strong and I believe that it commands the support of the Chinese people," Li told a press conference at the Great Hall of the People.
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