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English As A Second Language

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1995 | YVETTE CABRERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, Gilberto and Lilia Hernani's six children left their homein Peru for the United States. When their last daughter said goodby, they felt isolated and alone. So in 1980, the couple sold their house and car, packed their belongings and departed their beloved motherland to start anew in what they call the "land of the freeways," otherwise known as Orange County.
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NEWS
May 1, 1994 | IRIS YOKOI
Michael Javier figures that whether you refer to it as arte, mei shu or bijutsu , art is a universal means of expression that brings together people of different backgrounds, ethnicities and ages. The use of art as expression is natural for immigrants who bring not only a "wealth of culture" from their native lands but also poignant personal tales of leaving their homes and trying to fit into a new country, Javier said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Worried that a drastic drop in enrollment at community adult schools after the Northridge earthquake could threaten future attendance-based funding, school district officials are launching an all-out campaign to draw students back to class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1994 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
While other educational institutions lost entire buildings to the Jan. 17 earthquake, Mission College has been struggling with a more perplexing loss--its English-language students. Exact attendance figures have not been compiled, but Carlie Tronto, dean of academic affairs at the Sylmar campus, said more than two dozen course sections were canceled or combined due to lack of students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Several groups that teach adults basic literacy skills and English as a second language are seeking volunteer tutors. They have announced new class schedules for tutor preparation. According to some estimates, as many as 700,000 Orange County adults are functionally illiterate or possess only limited reading and writing skills, and their number is steadily growing.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | ELAINE TASSY
Chul-Ho Lee doesn't really need to learn English. He led a full, successful life in Korea before coming to the United States six years ago to retire. He doesn't need it to get a job, because his eight children help support him. And he doesn't need it to make new friends, because they speak Korean. But he is on a mission to become fluent in English: "I have to graduate. This is very important. It is for my life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A group of about 20 parents at Roscoe Elementary School were so eager to have their own center where they could study English that they voluntarily rescued an abandoned schoolhouse from disrepair. With supplies and time donated by the Rotary Club of Sun Valley, the group pulled weeds, cleared debris, scrubbed walls and chased spiders, slowly transforming the run-down building that sits on a corner of the elementary school's playground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1993 | JOHN JOHNSON
Almost one in five students at Northridge Middle School lives in a gated compound surrounded by tall iron fences topped with coils of razor wire like the frontier of some country from which the citizens would like to escape. The two entrances to the 70 two-story stucco buildings that make up the Park Parthenia Apartments have guard booths manned by men and women wearing bulletproof vests under their crisp blue uniforms and polished gold badges.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Almost one in five students at Northridge Middle School lives in a gated compound surrounded by tall iron fences topped with coils of razor wire like the frontier of some country from which the citizens would like to escape. The main entrance to the complex of 70 two-story stucco buildings that make up the Park Parthenia Apartments has a guard booth staffed by men and women wearing bulletproof vests under their crisp blue uniforms and polished gold badges.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
As a group of English as a Second Language teaching volunteers neared the end of their training recently, they got a taste of how their students will feel by learning a few Russian words. The exercise in an unfamiliar language was intended to sensitize the volunteers to the difficulties of learning a language, said instructor Mary Anne Nelson of California Literacy Inc.
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