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English As A Second Language

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a continuing upward trend, the number of Ventura County public school students who speak little or no English increased by nearly 2,000, or about 10%, last year, according to a new report. The influx brings the number of limited-English-speaking students in the county to about one-fifth of the county's 116,230 students, according to the report by the office of the Ventura County superintendent of schools. The statistics were compiled from last spring's enrollment figures.
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NEWS
December 24, 1992 | PAT KEMPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Each September at Channel Islands High School in Oxnard, students show up at William Terrazas' English as a Second Language class flaunting gang affiliations and planning to quit school. But according to Terrazas and several of his students, by June many have dropped the gang colors, started applying to colleges and universities and are featured speakers at teachers conferences.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | IRIS YOKOI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Spanish is the only language Jose Hernandez has known for most of his 10 years. It's the only language spoken at home with his family, who came to the United States from El Salvador three years ago. So up until a year ago, Jose had a hard time learning and understanding English, his teachers say. But with the help of a new language program at Rosemont Avenue School, the fifth-grader can now tell you confidently what English compound words are. And he's becoming computer literate.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | ERIN J. AUBRY
I sit alone sometimes, still with a heavy heart, thinking about Beverly, because she was such a good friend. We knew each other four years. We met at work. She would come in and always say, "Hey, girlfriend!" and I would say the same. She made being at work a little more pleasant. Right now I'm going through some grieving. Sometimes people say, "Well, she wasn't your family," but you can be closer to your friends than you are to your family. There was so much: intimate conversations, time spent together, functions we attended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1992 | WILLSON CUMMER
English students in North County will soon have a new teacher--a computer--to help them work on their pronunciation. The Eastside Christian School set up a computer lab in October and will offer English-as-a-second-language classes in January. The computer will teach spoken English by using voice synthesizers, pictures and text on the screen.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | SHEARLEAN DUKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Liliana Calderon, 7, wiggled out of her seat and ran to join the 30 other second-graders who had gathered in the center of the classroom. With rap music throbbing behind her, Liliana began to chant today's reading lesson, barely missing a beat as her small voice gained confidence. Nearby in the fifth-grade room, 10-year-old Myla Ramirez, without any musical accompaniment, stood at her desk, clapped her hands and began chanting along with her classmates.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
When Irais Flores came to Santa Ana from Mexico two years ago, she envisioned earning a decent living by cleaning other people's homes or taking care of their children. But month after month, she found herself unable to find work because she does not speak English. Now, she and her husband, Luis, carve their daily living from selling pumpkin seeds, hair ribbons and yo-yos to passersby in a grocery store parking lot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1992 | ROSE APODACA
Flags recognizing the national Academic Excellence Award were presented last week at the Fountain Valley School district's board meeting to honor a program that teaches English to students of different language backgrounds. Project GLAD (Guided Language Acquisition Design) enables instructors to teach a class of limited-English students of various ethnic backgrounds simultaneously.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a few minutes before 8, and well into Lucia Ruiz's day. She sits in the cafeteria at Evans Community Adult School, drinking a quick cup of thick hot chocolate between early morning classes and describing her schedule: * Up by 4:30 a.m.--at the latest. * A 40-minute, two-bus trip to Evans, on Sunset and Figueroa, in time for the 5:50-7:50 English as a second language class, followed 10 minutes later by another two-hour session in English.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overheard on the Charles Bridge: "I couldn't believe it, man, I mean, she was beautiful! And she just got up and, like, walked out. . . ." You can hear it just walking down the streets here, those passing flashes of youthful American English, as emphatic as the sound of a basketball dribbled on concrete, pronounced in bursts of enthusiasm, like . . . declaiming. The love affair. Exhilarating, heart-stopping, complicated, uncertain, but, like . . . love. Americans in love with Prague.
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