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July 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
England, isolated for five years because of its violence-prone fans, was brought back into the European soccer community today with the decision to allow its teams to again play in tournaments on the continent. The Union of European Football Assns. imposed no explicit conditions on the return of English clubs, banned after the 1985 Heysel Stadium disaster in Brussels in which 39 people died.
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SPORTS
February 24, 2011 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
The wandering Englishman showed up in Carson on Thursday morning, happily back in the sunshine but perhaps not so happily back out of the limelight. David Beckham has returned to America and the Galaxy. You could hardly have missed the fact that he's been away, what with the vaunted Beckham publicity machine churning out ? one is tempted to say manufacturing ? one story after another for the always voracious tabloids on both sides of the Atlantic. Not a day went by, it seemed, when the Beckham brand was not being touted somewhere, somehow, some way. Before seeing what he had to say for himself Thursday, just consider some of the Beckham "sightings" during his three-month absence from these parts: ?
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SPORTS
July 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
England, isolated for five years because of its violence-prone fans, was brought back into the European soccer community Tuesday. The Union of European Football Assns. imposed no explicit conditions on the return of English clubs, banned after the 1985 Heysel Stadium disaster in Brussels in which 39 died in a riot started by unruly English fans.
SPORTS
February 5, 2011 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
It hasn't taken Boston Red Sox and Liverpool owner John W. Henry long to get the hang of this soccer thing. Not long at all. In fact, if English clubs aren't careful, it won't be long before Henry and his fellow American owners ? Stan Kroenke at Arsenal, Randy Lerner at Aston Villa and Malcolm Glazer at Manchester United ? start calling the shots in the Premier League. Given soccer's sorry state of affairs ? highlighted by the ineptitude of the English Football Assn. and a spend-and-be-damned attitude by certain Premier League clubs already floundering in debt ?
SPORTS
June 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
English clubs probably won't be allowed back in European competition this fall after renewed violence at the World Cup, Lennart Johansson, president of Europe's governing soccer federation, said today. "They will probably have to wait one more year," said Johansson, UEFA president. "I've heard about fans throwing rocks at police officers and several fans being arrested. There seems to be no end to this and it is all very sad."
BUSINESS
May 30, 1997 | DIRK BEVERIDGE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
English soccer is commanding a fair bit of attention these days in what might seem an unlikely venue: the stock market. More and more clubs are testing their fortunes in the rough-and-tumble corporate world as they raise cash by selling shares to the public. And what's happening in the market can be as wild as what takes place on the field. Stock prices have fluctuated sharply amid hype about pay-per-view deals with television companies. Earlier in the year, clubs' shares were up about 400 percent for a 12-month period.
SPORTS
April 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
The outgoing president of the European athletic federation said today that it would be "suicidal" to allow English clubs back into European soccer competitions without first getting crowd-control guarantees from the British government. English clubs have been banned since the 1985 Heysel stadium disaster, when 39 fans were killed in riots at the European Champions' Cup final in Brussels.
SPORTS
April 12, 1989
European soccer's governing body has voted to readmit English clubs to its three major cup competitions for the 1990-91 season, but said good fan behavior must be guaranteed. UEFA imposed a blanket ban on English clubs after 39 people were killed when a wall collapsed during fighting between rival fans before the European Champions Cup final between England's Liverpool and Italy's Juventus of Turin in May, 1985.
SPORTS
April 17, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
UEFA, European soccer's governing body, said today its decision on conditionally readmitting English clubs to European competitions next season remains unchanged. However, UEFA President Jacques Georges of France will seek a meeting with British Sports Minister Colin Moynihan after English authorities complete their probe of the "massacre at Sheffield" in which 94 people died. Based on Georges' report, UEFA's executive committee will then "take the necessary decision," a brief UEFA statement said.
SPORTS
June 24, 2006 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
If South Korean fans today want to blame anyone or anything for their team's World Cup exit, they can blame Arsenal. It was a player from the north London club, Switzerland defender Philippe Senderos, who stuck the first stake in the Koreans' hopes. It was a former Arsenal player, France midfielder Patrick Vieira, who dealt the second blow. And it was Arsenal's highest-profile player, France striker Thierry Henry, who finished off matters. First, some perspective.
SPORTS
May 13, 2005 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Manchester United, the world's wealthiest and arguably most famous soccer club, became American property in all but name Thursday. Malcolm Glazer, the billionaire owner of the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers, achieved effective control of the English team by buying a 28.7% stake in the club from Irish racehorse owners J.P. McManus and John Magnier. That raised Glazer's share in the 127-year-old team to 56.9% and paved the way for a complete takeover.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1997 | DIRK BEVERIDGE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
English soccer is commanding a fair bit of attention these days in what might seem an unlikely venue: the stock market. More and more clubs are testing their fortunes in the rough-and-tumble corporate world as they raise cash by selling shares to the public. And what's happening in the market can be as wild as what takes place on the field. Stock prices have fluctuated sharply amid hype about pay-per-view deals with television companies.
SPORTS
August 9, 1994 | Associated Press
Cobi Jones, the speedy midfielder with dreadlocks on the U.S. World Cup team, is joining American Roy Wegerle as a member of Coventry City in the English Premier League this season. The central English club said Jones signed a one-year contract with the Sky Blues with an option to stay two more seasons. "I think he will do well over here," Coventry Chairman Bryan Richardson said of the 24-year-old. "He is certainly box office material and we hope he will bring a spark to the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The trouble with treasures these days is that so many of them seem to be buried. Consider British guitarist Martin Simpson, whose deeply emotional yet finely delineated expressions on his instrument are like precisely cut gems: Their fire leaps out at you. If you can find them, his recent Shanachie albums "When I Was on Horseback" and "Leaves of Life" demonstrate his masterful way with traditional British instrumental tunes.
SPORTS
August 22, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
A first-division English soccer team was warned today that it could be expelled if there is another incident of fan violence similar to the one that accompanied a victory in May. The Football Assn., English soccer's governing body, said it would revoke Leeds United's membership as "the ultimate sanction." "It is not a likely scenario, but it is a possible scenario," said David Bloomfield, the FA's spokesman.
SPORTS
April 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
In a surprise move today, top European soccer officials voted unanimously to readmit English clubs into European competitions for the season beginning 1990-91. Speaking after the Union of European Football Assns.' executive committee meeting in Palmela, 25 miles south of Lisbon, UEFA President Jacques Georges said, "Taking into account the great effort taken by English authorities for assuring security in stadiums, UEFA has decided for the reintegration of English clubs into the inter-European competitions from the season 1990-91."
SPORTS
July 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
England, isolated for five years because of its violence-prone fans, was brought back into the European soccer community Tuesday. The Union of European Football Assns. imposed no explicit conditions on the return of English clubs, banned after the 1985 Heysel Stadium disaster in Brussels in which 39 died in a riot started by unruly English fans.
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