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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2007 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Juan Garcia makes the same resolution every New Year's: Learn English. Despite being in the U.S. for 15 years, the Mexican immigrant knows only a few words and phrases. Too busy with work and family, he has put off enrolling in a class. "The days pass and the years pass, and I don't do it," said Garcia, 63, who lives in Los Angeles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The highest compliment I ever paid an editor was to say that she had changed the way I think about commas. That may not sound like much, but it was revolutionary to me. Commas, punctuation, good grammar -- these are precision tools, designed for clarity. If you're a writer, they're all you have. But no ... not only if you're a writer; they are also essential if you want to accurately express your thoughts. As Fiona Maazel observes in a terrific little essay for the Millions : “On the spectrum of world problems that need bemoaning, is bad grammar really one of them?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1996
A. Trujillo Escareno wrote (letter, May 29) about the lack of consistency exhibited by the English language. As an Englishman I can explain this--we deliberately made our language difficult in order to keep foreigners who try to speak it off balance and confused. Since most Americans also speak a sort of English, we try to achieve the same goal with you by pronouncing our place names in unpredictable ways; for example, the river Thames is pronounced "Tems," not "Thayms." My British uncle was so used to this notion that after a whirlwind tour of California he returned home to tell everyone: "Over there they have a town that is spelled "La Jolla," but pronounced "Saint Luis Obispo.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
One suspects the world is out of kilter when a French girl utters cultural sacrilege: "Love is stronger than death? What a load of bull. " The girl in question, Camille, has returned from the dead, unbruised and unbloodied and looking just as she did four years earlier, before her school bus rounded a reservoir and sailed off a mountain. She does not devour flesh or walk in spastic shuffles. She's a zombie in the European style, moving with grace, pouting and posing existential questions in a mountain village where the water is rising and animals are up to strange things.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
For anyone interested in the politics of left and right -- and in political journalism as it is practiced at the highest level -- George Orwell's works are indispensable. This week, in the year marking the 110th anniversary of his birth, we present a personal list of his five greatest essays.   The winner and still champ, Orwell's "Politics and the English Language"  stands as the finest deconstruction of slovenly writing since Mark Twain's " Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses . " Orwell's essay, published in 1946 in Cyril Connolly's literary review Horizon, is not as sarcastic or funny as Twain's, but unlike Twain, Orwell makes the connection between degraded language and political deceit (at both ends of the political spectrum)
NEWS
May 23, 1986 | Associated Press
The teaching of the English language at "all educational stages" has been halted in Libya, the official Jana news agency reported Thursday. Russian is being taught instead, the dispatch said. It gave no other details. Libya's official language is Arabic, and it has long banned English and other foreign languages from public signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2009 | Anna Gorman
Nearly 30% of Los Angeles Unified School District students placed in English language learning classes in early primary grades were still in the program when they started high school, increasing their chances of dropping out, according to a new study released Wednesday. More than half of those students were born in the United States and three-quarters had been in the school district since first grade, according to the report by the Tomás Rivera Policy Institute at USC. The findings raise questions about the teaching in the district's English language classes, whether students are staying in the program too long and what more educators should do for students who start school unable to speak English fluently.
WORLD
July 4, 2010 | By Joshua Frank, Los Angeles Times
The crowded market for English-language foreign news is making room for a surprising new player: CNC World, a 24-hour television news channel launched by the New China News Agency, or Xinhua, China's main news service. In launching a "new source of information for global audiences," CNC apparently wants to be an English-language alternative to the dominant narratives of Western media, such as the BBC, CNN and certainly Fox. CNC will be broadcast in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, North America and Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1998 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
Students will receive mostly English instruction under a board policy adopted this week by school trustees. The policy, approved with a 4-1 vote, ensures that classroom instruction be delivered "overwhelmingly in English," or 80% English and 20% in a student's primary language. Trustee Kim Ann Guth voted against the policy, saying it was too lenient. "I don't object to the effort that the district has made," Guth said. "It just didn't go far enough."
NEWS
October 20, 1986 | Jack Smith
Those of us who were not jubilant over the appointment of William Rehnquist as chief justice of the United States may find reason not to despair in an observation from my esteemed colleague, Gladwin Hill. "Success!" he writes. "We can come out in the open now. Up to now our Alliance Against Vulgarization of English has had to operate underground, because we were up against too much opposition. But now we've arrived. One of our people now sits as chief justice of the United States."
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Mohamed Juma and Laura King
BENGHAZI, Libya - Relatively few Americans remained in this eastern Libyan city as street battles raged and Islamic militants made ever-bolder forays in recent weeks. But Ronnie Smith, a chemistry teacher at an English-language school, stayed on, planning, colleagues said, to return soon to the United States for Christmas. Smith, 33, of Texas was gunned down Thursday by an unknown assailant or assailants as he jogged in an affluent central neighborhood of Benghazi, not far from the U.S. Consulate where an attack in September 2012 killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
For anyone interested in the politics of left and right -- and in political journalism as it is practiced at the highest level -- George Orwell's works are indispensable. This week, in the year marking the 110th anniversary of his birth, we present a personal list of his five greatest essays.   The winner and still champ, Orwell's "Politics and the English Language"  stands as the finest deconstruction of slovenly writing since Mark Twain's " Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses . " Orwell's essay, published in 1946 in Cyril Connolly's literary review Horizon, is not as sarcastic or funny as Twain's, but unlike Twain, Orwell makes the connection between degraded language and political deceit (at both ends of the political spectrum)
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration, facing glitches in necessary computer systems, is delaying two online tools supposed to go live Tuesday for enrolling Americans in insurance under the president's health law. California is unaffected by the delay. But small businesses in some states that want to sign up their employees for health coverage on new federally run marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act will have to use paper forms until November, according to administration officials.
OPINION
August 25, 2013 | Laurel V. Cortes
The English language has no more deadly cliché than "Boys will be boys. " The author lives in Riverside. Read more: Opinion poetry by Times readers  
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Meg James and Hector Becerra
From the barbershops of El Monte to a mariachi outfitter's in Boyle Heights, many Southern Californians struggled Tuesday to make sense of the sudden disappearance of the wacky, warmhearted man they'd woken up with for the last decade. On Monday, Univision Radio Network announced that it had dropped " Piolín por la Mañana," the highly popular, nationally syndicated Spanish-language morning radio talk show hosted by Eddie " Piolín " Sotelo, whose ratings have been in decline for years.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook Monday announced that its updated search feature will begin rolling out to all users who have their language set to U.S. English over the next few weeks, regardless of whether or not they want Graph Search. The company unveiled Graph Search earlier this year, saying it would help users easily and quickly find specific data on the social network. Users, for example, can search for pictures of themselves taken in a specific city, or they can look for friends who like a specific movie or music band.
SPORTS
June 7, 1993 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of what was shaping up to be John Lee's best round of the high school golf season, he could think of only one thing. After 11 holes, Lee, a sophomore from Valencia, was four-under par; the Southern Section individual title was within reach. Was he nervous? Nope. Lee had something more basic in his mind. "I was hungry, very hungry," Lee said. Lee had started his round at Canyon Country Club in Palm Springs without breakfast because the snack bar wasn't open.
NEWS
October 27, 1985 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
A measure to declare English the official language of the city appears headed for the ballot next April amid charges that the proposal exploits racial fears for political advantage. R. E. (Pete) Hollingsworth, president of the city library board, said he and others are forming a committee to oppose the initiative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Donald Richie, an American expatriate in Japan who became that country's preeminent Western interpreter, explaining its culture - from cinema to Zen to tattoos - in books and essays that illuminated the author's psyche as much as that of his adopted home, has died. He was 88. Richie, who lived in Japan for more than 50 years, died Tuesday in Tokyo after a series of small strokes and other ailments, said his longtime friend Christopher Blasdel. An Ohio native, Richie discovered Japan in the early years of its struggle to recover from the devastation of World War II. He found a unique freedom there as a gaijin, or foreigner, who, he wrote, "could be expected to know nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Amy Dawes
To speak with Herbert Kretzmer, writer of the English-language lyrics for "Les Misérables," is uncannily like being let in on his creative process. He chooses his words - considering one, tossing it out, employing another, while muttering asides like "yes, that's better" - as if he were composing on the spot. Kretzmer was 60, and the longtime theater and television critic of the U.K.'s Daily Mail, when he took leave to tackle the "Les Misérables" project on a five-month deadline before the London debut of the musical in 1985.
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