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English Learners

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2006 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
A divided state Board of Education on Monday adopted far-reaching new guidelines for reading and English language arts textbooks aimed at California's elementary and middle school students, despite objections that the materials do not do enough to help students struggling to learn English.
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NEWS
July 23, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after voters approved the anti-bilingual education law Proposition 227, tens of thousands of California schoolchildren with limited English skills showed only modest gains in Stanford 9 test scores released Thursday. Statewide, third-grade reading scores for English learners, who make up 21% of the test takers in California, rose only 4 percentile points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
One-third of California's 1.4 million nonnative students demonstrated enough English fluency this year to gain access to higher-level and college-prep course work, a modest improvement over last year, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education. Increasing limited-English-speaking students' access to more rigorous classes and decreasing the achievement gap between these students and their native classmates are "moral" and "economic" imperatives, said Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2009 | Anna Gorman
Nearly 30% of Los Angeles Unified School District students placed in English language learning classes in early primary grades were still in the program when they started high school, increasing their chances of dropping out, according to a new study released Wednesday. More than half of those students were born in the United States and three-quarters had been in the school district since first grade, according to the report by the Tomás Rivera Policy Institute at USC. The findings raise questions about the teaching in the district's English language classes, whether students are staying in the program too long and what more educators should do for students who start school unable to speak English fluently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1998 | JOHN ESPINOZA, John Espinoza teaches at Malabar Elementary School
I am one of 5,500 bilingual teachers who work for the Los Angeles Unified School District. For the past 19 years, I have taught students whose first language is not English. Almost 100% of these students are, by my standards, poor. I've taught kindergarten through fifth grade, gifted and remedial students. While I know that many of our immigrant students in LAUSD are successfully progressing through the system, I also know that some of them are not.
OPINION
May 2, 2013
Re "Gov. Brown as Robin Hood," Column, April 29 In his column casting doubt on Gov. Jerry Brown's demand that money be shifted from better-off school districts to ones that have a higher share of disadvantaged students and English learners, George Skelton's poison pen writes - with no attribution other than "some" in Sacramento - that Brown was "cranky" after returning from his trip to China because of jet lag. Skelton notes speculation that...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The state education department has ignored its obligation to make sure that thousands of students learning English receive adequate and legally required assistance, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court. State officials said they had not studied the lawsuit, but insisted they are meeting their legal obligations. The suit, filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and others, focuses on an estimated 20,000 students who are receiving no help or inadequate services as they work to learn English and keep up academically at the same time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2010 | By Howard blume
The federal government has singled out the Los Angeles Unified School District for its first major investigation under a reinvigorated Office for Civil Rights, officials said Tuesday. The focus of the probe, by an arm of the U.S. Department of Education, will be whether the nation's second-largest district provides adequate services to students learning English. Officials turned their attention to L.A. Unified because so many English learners fare poorly and because they make up about a third of district enrollment, more than 220,000 students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1997
Congratulations to the Orange Unified School District trustees for scrapping the bilingual education program (April 18). It has proven it does not work. As a teacher of a language (Esperanto) I can tell you that total English immersion is the best method. We already print the voting ballots and vehicle code in several languages. It's about time we say we cannot afford to be all things to all people. To my friends of other lands who have chosen the United States to live and work I say, become united with us and learn our language and culture.
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