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English Proficiency

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In California and across the country, more people are speaking Spanish, Korean or a slew of other languages besides English at home - a phenomenon that has historically set off heated debate about how immigrants will assimilate into American life. Yet in recent years, as other tongues became more common in American homes, people nationwide were no less likely to speak English with ease, a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau shows. Scholars say slowing immigration has given rise to a more settled population of people born abroad.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
For Maricela Ruiz, a trip to the store to pick up a few groceries or to her daughter's school felt nearly impossible. “I'd go home crying,” said Ruiz, 37. She couldn't speak English, and after a few failed attempts at communication, began to wait for her husband to come home to help her run errands. For Ruiz, who moved from Mexico to Pasadena two years ago, the language barrier proved isolating. But a year ago Ruiz joined Mother's Club Family Learning Center, a nonprofit in Pasadena that provides English classes to mothers and their children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1998 | Jason Kandel, (714) 564-1038
Free computer classes will be offered beginning Jan. 11 at Taller San Jose, 801 N. Broadway, a vocational school. Morning, afternoon, evening and Saturday schedules are available. Students must be at least 18 years old and have an intermediate English proficiency. Information: (714) 543-5105.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In California and across the country, more people are speaking Spanish, Korean or a slew of other languages besides English at home - a phenomenon that has historically set off heated debate about how immigrants will assimilate into American life. Yet in recent years, as other tongues became more common in American homes, people nationwide were no less likely to speak English with ease, a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau shows. Scholars say slowing immigration has given rise to a more settled population of people born abroad.
NEWS
April 15, 1993
School officials in La Crescenta are offering a seminar Saturday to show parents who don't speak English that they can still play an active role in their children's studies. More than 200 parents of students who are likewise limited in English proficiency are expected to attend the conference, said Magaly Lavadenz, a teacher specialist for the Glendale Unified School District. The seminar will be from 9:15 a.m. to noon at the Clark Staff Development Center, 4747 New York Ave., La Crescenta.
OPINION
August 27, 2000
Re "Democrats May Have Lost Latinos," Commentary, Aug. 20: The federal government is required under Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to ensure that programs and activities funded by the federal government do not discriminate against persons on the basis of race, color or national origin. Language barriers prevent the government from effectively serving a large number of people for whom English is a second language. While Frank Del Olmo and others are busy weighing the impact of the Democratic convention on Latino voters, President Clinton was signing an executive order which will make the workings of all branches of the federal government more accessible to persons of limited English proficiency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1998
"Board Confirms Local-Control Policy on Bilingual Study" (April 9) indicates that Prop. 227 "calls for children with limited English skills to be put in mainstream (English-only academic) classes after about one year of English-language tutoring." Parents of our 1.4 million limited-English-proficient students would love for their children to have tutors to teach them English. The only tutoring mentioned in Prop. 227 is "community-based English tutoring," for which $500 million would be appropriated from the general fund over a 10-year period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2006 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
English proficiency remained stagnant among nonnative students in California last year, and most who did achieve fluency weren't given more challenging course work to prepare them for college, according to a state study released Wednesday. "We clearly need to look at why this gap is occurring and determine how to address it," said state Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell. It's not enough to have English learners master the language, he said. "They also must ...
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Test scores released Thursday paint a picture of public school student achievement in California that is at once surprisingly bright and dauntingly grim, with those who speak English doing well compared with national averages and those who do not continuing to be severely outmatched. Scores in reading, math, spelling and other subjects from the second annual administration of the Stanford 9 test show a deep and predictable gulf between those who speak English fluently and those who do not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1994
The attacks on the California Learning Assessment System tests as violating students' privacy rights miss the point of both the CLAS tests themselves and the larger issue of what is "education." I recently took an English proficiency exam as part of my graduate program in mathematics at Cal State Northridge. The exam consisted of composing an essay in response to a question not unlike those used in the CLAS test. I was asked to describe how I felt about some subject. Nowhere in the experience did I find this to be an invasion of privacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2009 | Howard Blume
Parents in Los Angeles this week will receive a one-page report card that will provide a less varnished and more accessible picture of how well their child's school is doing. For high schools, the report card will provide more accurate dropout figures and display, for example, how many students are proficient in English and math -- and whether that number is going up or down.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2006 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writers
English would be declared the "national language" of the United States under a measure the Senate approved Thursday, a largely symbolic move that supporters said would promote unity and encourage assimilation by immigrants. The measure would not reverse government practices of providing some materials and services -- including voting ballots and emergency advisories -- in other languages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2006 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
English proficiency remained stagnant among nonnative students in California last year, and most who did achieve fluency weren't given more challenging course work to prepare them for college, according to a state study released Wednesday. "We clearly need to look at why this gap is occurring and determine how to address it," said state Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell. It's not enough to have English learners master the language, he said. "They also must ...
OPINION
April 3, 2004
The acronyms help tell the story. Years ago they were ESL children, immigrant children for whom English was a second language. Then they were renamed LEP, for their limited English proficiency. Today those same kids are dubbed ELL, or English-language learners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2003 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
About one-third of California's public school students who previously had limited English skills showed success in learning to read, write and speak English this school year, a significant improvement over last school year, according to test results released Tuesday. Many teachers and school administrators said the gains reflect better teacher training and the switch to English immersion for most immigrant students under Proposition 227.
OPINION
January 11, 2003
Re "New Testing Adds Urgency to Bilingual Ed Battle," Jan. 4: There is no more insidious threat to the education of Latino children than bilingual education. It is destructive to their future. University studies are conducted in English, and English is a basic requirement for finding work and having a successful career. Latino children are not incapable of learning English, and Latino parents must be held accountable for ensuring that they do so. English immersion is the key. Children are sponges and will soak up knowledge, so parents need to make sure the TV is set to an English-speaking station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1998 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
School trustees tonight will consider adopting a policy that details English instruction as defined by Proposition 227. The policy mandates that classes be taught "overwhelmingly in English," or 80% English and 20% in a student's primary language. It also allows waivers for parents who, after 30 days, want to keep their children in bilingual education programs.
OPINION
August 27, 2000
Re "Democrats May Have Lost Latinos," Commentary, Aug. 20: The federal government is required under Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to ensure that programs and activities funded by the federal government do not discriminate against persons on the basis of race, color or national origin. Language barriers prevent the government from effectively serving a large number of people for whom English is a second language. While Frank Del Olmo and others are busy weighing the impact of the Democratic convention on Latino voters, President Clinton was signing an executive order which will make the workings of all branches of the federal government more accessible to persons of limited English proficiency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2000 | BRUCE FULLER and LUIS HUERTA, Bruce Fuller is a professor of education and public policy at UC Berkeley. Luis Huerta is a researcher at Policy Analysis for California Education. Their book, "Inside Charter Schools," is forthcoming in the fall from Harvard University Press
Parents and teachers constantly prod and cajole their children to pick up a new book, to bear down on homework, to spend more time on that science project. Yet we cannot always predict when our children will respond or why they become motivated to learn or be curious about new ideas.
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