Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEnglish Spelling
IN THE NEWS

English Spelling

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997
Do you like to "ghoti"? George Bernard Shaw pointed out that with the Roman alphabet the word "fish" might be spelled ghoti; f as in rough, i as in women and sh as in nation. I do like to ghoti. The fact that a single sound may be spelled in several different ways is the serious handicap of the Roman alphabet. I do not think it is just California students who have problems with spelling. JAMES D. HARAN Huntington Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 26, 2009 | By Meris Lutz
When Samih Toukan and Hussam Khoury started Maktoob.com as an Arabic e-mail service 10 years ago, they had a modest office in Amman, Jordan, and little support from friends and family who could not imagine anyone using the Internet in Arabic. "We were a typical start-up; I remember the day we got air conditioning we had a party," Toukan recalled. In August, Yahoo Inc. acquired Maktoob, now the largest Arabic portal, for a reported $80 million -- a milestone in the evolution of the Arabic Internet.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1988
William Tuohy's article gives the impression that German is extraordinarily difficult to learn and he seems to imply that this is the reason for its decline as an academic subject in high schools and colleges. Are the 90 million native speakers unusually gifted to master the "nightmarish complexity"? How about the nightmarish complexity of English spelling! The article, unfortunately, helps to promote certain assumptions rather than examining them. It would have been more productive to ask how the study of German can be an asset: To start with, it is still the lingua franca in the central European countries; for a number of academic disciplines, German is an essential research tool; the Federal Republic of Germany is the No. 1 export country in the world; its trade with the United States is substantial; it is the most important NATO partner; more than 4 million U.S. soldiers have done military service there; almost half the U.S. Army right now is stationed in West Germany.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Britons already feeling besieged by the Yank spellcheck on their computers, government guidelines to Americanize the spelling of some scientific words in schools are making them see the colour red. After all, sulfur and fetus aren't part of the queen's English they learnt. "As if Microsoft, the Internet, Disney, rap, McDonald's and chads were not enough to contend with, we now find an American fifth column in our own midst," huffed the Independent newspaper in an editorial last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993
Mademoiselle (or Madame) De Vries, please have mercy for the abused and defenseless langue Francaise ("Hello, I'm Catherine Deneuve," by Hilary de Vries, Dec. 27). "Belle de Jour (Daytime Beauty)" is the correct title of the unsurpassed Luis Bunuel movie. It is a play on words of the literary expression belle de nuit (night-time beauty), meaning "prostitute." Use du instead of de for the soup du jour you order at your favorite restaurant. Roger Vadim directed Deneuve in "Le Vice et la Vertu."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1986
Angie Papadakis has the best interests of Latinos at heart. Ramon should learn English. In the 1950s, while I was growing up in Boyle Heights, my parents, of Mexican descent, spoke Spanish to each other and to my relatives. At Santa Teresita, the Catholic elementary school I attended, however, there were no bilingual programs and so I learned English. I had English spelling and writing drilled into me by strict nuns. There is nothing I am so thankful for, nothing that has so benefited me, as that strong early education in reading and writing English.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Britons already feeling besieged by the Yank spellcheck on their computers, government guidelines to Americanize the spelling of some scientific words in schools are making them see the colour red. After all, sulfur and fetus aren't part of the queen's English they learnt. "As if Microsoft, the Internet, Disney, rap, McDonald's and chads were not enough to contend with, we now find an American fifth column in our own midst," huffed the Independent newspaper in an editorial last week.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | THOMAS H. MIDDLETON
A couple of weeks ago, I got a letter from my good friend Howard Fast, who said, among other things, that while George Bernard Shaw was one of his idols, he couldn't agree with Shaw's advocacy of the phonetic, or "simplified," spelling of English. Shaw's most famous demonstration of the absurdity of English orthography was the imaginative spelling ghoti for the word fish.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2009 | By Meris Lutz
When Samih Toukan and Hussam Khoury started Maktoob.com as an Arabic e-mail service 10 years ago, they had a modest office in Amman, Jordan, and little support from friends and family who could not imagine anyone using the Internet in Arabic. "We were a typical start-up; I remember the day we got air conditioning we had a party," Toukan recalled. In August, Yahoo Inc. acquired Maktoob, now the largest Arabic portal, for a reported $80 million -- a milestone in the evolution of the Arabic Internet.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | Jack Smith
Crusaders for Esperanto, the international language, will always be with us; so will those who want to simplify English spelling. Simplified spelling has been pushed by such unalike champions as George Bernard Shaw, the brilliant British playwright and critic, and Col. Robert R. McCormick, editor and publisher of the Chicago Tribune--"The World's Greatest Newspaper."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997
Do you like to "ghoti"? George Bernard Shaw pointed out that with the Roman alphabet the word "fish" might be spelled ghoti; f as in rough, i as in women and sh as in nation. I do like to ghoti. The fact that a single sound may be spelled in several different ways is the serious handicap of the Roman alphabet. I do not think it is just California students who have problems with spelling. JAMES D. HARAN Huntington Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993
Mademoiselle (or Madame) De Vries, please have mercy for the abused and defenseless langue Francaise ("Hello, I'm Catherine Deneuve," by Hilary de Vries, Dec. 27). "Belle de Jour (Daytime Beauty)" is the correct title of the unsurpassed Luis Bunuel movie. It is a play on words of the literary expression belle de nuit (night-time beauty), meaning "prostitute." Use du instead of de for the soup du jour you order at your favorite restaurant. Roger Vadim directed Deneuve in "Le Vice et la Vertu."
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | THOMAS H. MIDDLETON
A couple of weeks ago, I got a letter from my good friend Howard Fast, who said, among other things, that while George Bernard Shaw was one of his idols, he couldn't agree with Shaw's advocacy of the phonetic, or "simplified," spelling of English. Shaw's most famous demonstration of the absurdity of English orthography was the imaginative spelling ghoti for the word fish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1988
William Tuohy's article gives the impression that German is extraordinarily difficult to learn and he seems to imply that this is the reason for its decline as an academic subject in high schools and colleges. Are the 90 million native speakers unusually gifted to master the "nightmarish complexity"? How about the nightmarish complexity of English spelling! The article, unfortunately, helps to promote certain assumptions rather than examining them. It would have been more productive to ask how the study of German can be an asset: To start with, it is still the lingua franca in the central European countries; for a number of academic disciplines, German is an essential research tool; the Federal Republic of Germany is the No. 1 export country in the world; its trade with the United States is substantial; it is the most important NATO partner; more than 4 million U.S. soldiers have done military service there; almost half the U.S. Army right now is stationed in West Germany.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | Jack Smith
Crusaders for Esperanto, the international language, will always be with us; so will those who want to simplify English spelling. Simplified spelling has been pushed by such unalike champions as George Bernard Shaw, the brilliant British playwright and critic, and Col. Robert R. McCormick, editor and publisher of the Chicago Tribune--"The World's Greatest Newspaper."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1986
Angie Papadakis has the best interests of Latinos at heart. Ramon should learn English. In the 1950s, while I was growing up in Boyle Heights, my parents, of Mexican descent, spoke Spanish to each other and to my relatives. At Santa Teresita, the Catholic elementary school I attended, however, there were no bilingual programs and so I learned English. I had English spelling and writing drilled into me by strict nuns. There is nothing I am so thankful for, nothing that has so benefited me, as that strong early education in reading and writing English.
WORLD
September 15, 2003 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Is alphabetical order destiny? Yes, say Korean scholars and politicians who have begun a drive to change the official English-language name of their country to "Corea." The seemingly arcane campaign is based on an increasingly prevalent belief that the original "C" was switched to a "K" by the Japanese at the start of their 1910-45 occupation of the peninsula so that their lowly colonials would not precede them in the English alphabetical hierarchy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|