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TRAVEL
January 10, 1993
Another book to add to the reading list of those intrigued by Baja California and the legendary Baja Highway: "Into a Desert Place" by Graham Macintosh. This is the true story of a young Englishman who walked the length of the Baja Peninsula and survived to write a most entertaining book about it. A truly good read. MONICA CONRADY San Francisco
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SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Writers from around the Tribune Co. offer their predictions as to who will win this week's British Open. Feel free to join the conversation by leaving a comment of your own. Bill Dwyre, Los Angeles Times Brandt Snedeker will win the British Open for all the obvious reasons: He's a really smart guy with a Vanderbilt degree, and figuring out that your pitching wedge may end up going 190 yards with the last 90 bouncing on the hard ground will...
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TRAVEL
January 5, 1986
After reading Jack Pitman's article, "Guide to English English" (Dec. 8), I can well understand why Americans are regarded with contempt by most Londoners. The slang terms he lists have not been in popular use since the '50s. As anyone who has ever eaten an English sausage can testify, it is not meatless. Better use of the space would have been to list those words which have different meanings in the United Kingdom, such as "pants," which do not refer to trousers but to male or female underwear.
SPORTS
June 16, 2013 | By Mark Wogenrich
ARDMORE, Pa. - Justin Rose received a text message last week telling him to "go out and be the man your dad taught you to be. " After he finished his round but before he had won the U.S. Open on Sunday at Merion Golf Club, Rose pointed skyward as a nod to his late father and coach, Ken. "The look up to the heavens was absolutely for my dad," Rose said. "Father's Day was not lost on me today. You don't have opportunities to really dedicate a win to someone you love. And today was about him. " Rose shot an even-par 70 Sunday, capping it with one of the loveliest pars he has ever made, to win the U.S. Open by two shots over Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. Rose, 32, finished one over par and became the first English player to win the U.S. Open in 43 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1995
Look here, I wish to passionately protest the return, in movies such as "Braveheart" and others, of the depiction of Englishmen as spineless wankers and despots. I mean, I'm not going to boycott anything or march and carry placards, but I am writing this letter and for an Englishman that's pretty bloody passionate. I had thought that Hugh Grant had re-established the Englishman onscreen as, yes, essentially spineless, but nonetheless charming and a damned good chap. There was a time when an Englishman on the silver screen was a dashing and full-blooded fellow.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2003
Arnold Forman asks about technology, assuming that another reader's visitors came from Italy by plane ["Debate About Vacation Time Keeps Raging," Letters, Sept. 7]. His assumption that American technology made it possible is incorrect: The jet engine was invented by Frank Whittle, an Englishman, and radio by an Italian, Guglielmo Marconi. Airbus Industries, a French company, is a market leader in commercial aircraft sales. The father of the modern computer was Alan Turing, British.
MAGAZINE
November 10, 1985 | BEVIS HILLIER
As an Englishman who has now lived in Los Angeles for 18 months, I am sometimes asked, "What do you like best about living in America?" I usually answer: "Being able to unjack my telephone." In England, for the most part, you can't; and if you leave the receiver off the hook, you are quite likely to be visited by an officious man on a motorcycle, asking you why. Freedom from the tyranny of the telephone is not the least of life's freedoms.
SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Writers from around the Tribune Co. offer their predictions as to who will win this week's British Open. Feel free to join the conversation by leaving a comment of your own. Bill Dwyre, Los Angeles Times Brandt Snedeker will win the British Open for all the obvious reasons: He's a really smart guy with a Vanderbilt degree, and figuring out that your pitching wedge may end up going 190 yards with the last 90 bouncing on the hard ground will...
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cummings, the perennially youthful bachelor photographer of the 1950s television series "The Bob Cummings Show," died Sunday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. Cummings, 80, died of kidney failure and complications of pneumonia, hospital spokeswoman Louella Benson said. The actor, who also was in advanced stages of Parkinson's Disease, was admitted to the hospital Nov. 18.
NEWS
August 30, 1985 | ART SEIDENBAUM
England, First & Last by Anthony Bailey (Elizabeth Sifton/Viking: $15.95) This sometimes charming, occasionally graceful, always lucid book is a little memoir making a global round. The individual stops are more engaging than the whole journey. Read about Anthony Bailey, then a boy, coming home to England after four formative years in the United States.
SPORTS
February 6, 2013
PEBBLE BEACH - Lee Westwood still doesn't know why his father took him to the golf course. He played just about every other sport in England when he was 12, such as soccer, cricket and rugby. He used to go fishing with his father, but the fish weren't biting, mainly because Westwood kept throwing stones into the water. So off they went to a golf course called Kilton Forest, neither of them having ever so much as swung a club. Westwood was hooked. "I turned pro at 19 and came on tour, and he was still a 12 handicap, so I can't understand the reasons for that," Westwood said.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2013 | By David Pilling
When Michael Woodford in 2011 became president of Olympus Corp., the Japanese optical equipment maker, he told his secretary there was no need to walk backward each time she left his office. In the executive suite of a Japanese company, where fawning deference to those at the top is the norm, this counted as a radical egalitarian gesture. But, as Woodford discovered, he was not really at the top at all. Although he had been promoted to the presidency, becoming the first foreigner to assume that role since the company was established in 1919, he was kept out of the inner circle.
WORLD
April 17, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
GIVERNY, France - When James Priest is asked to strike a Claude Monet pose and stroll under the famous arched trellises lining the pathway of the painter's world-renowned garden, he becomes almost giddy, his excitement melting into a grin. "Compare me to Monet?" asks the 54-year-old gardener, standing between the lush strokes of yellow, pink and red tulips - nature's spring palette - that glow in the midday light in this preserved village 45 miles northwest of Paris. To Priest, no compliment could be higher, and, as he quickly insists with playful charm, undeserved: "Nobody can fill his shoes.
WORLD
April 2, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING — In China, there are no elections, no slugfest debates, no $1,000-a-plate fundraisers. But lately the country seems to be taking a page from American politics, complete with campaign-style dirty tricks and a politician who wouldn't seem out of place pressing the flesh on the convention floor. As in the United States, this is a transition year for China. In October, the Communist Party convenes to choose a successor to Hu Jintao, who is retiring as the party's secretary-general and, next year, as president.
SPORTS
December 3, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Reporting from New York -- Miguel Cotto got his revenge against Antonio Margarito on Saturday, belting his bitter rival throughout nine rounds until a ringside doctor ruled that the wounded Tijuana fighter could no longer continue. The clearly crisper Cotto (37-2, 30 knockouts) repeatedly got the best of Margarito by smashing him with jabs, straight rights and sturdy lefts. By the seventh round, Margarito's previously injured right eye was closed, and an extra ringside doctor began watching the eye closely.
SPORTS
October 17, 2011 | By Jim Peltz
Seldom has winning a championship carried such heartache. Dario Franchitti had just won a remarkable third consecutive Izod IndyCar Series title, yet he sat in his race car sobbing after a massive wreck claimed the life of his friend and rival Dan Wheldon. Adding to the agony was that some drivers had voiced concern that despite safety advances in motor racing, a danger lurked at Sunday's race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway that rose above the sport's inherent risk. There were 34 cars traveling 220 mph or faster in a close pack on the banked, 1.5-mile oval in IndyCar's last race of the season.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Police arrested a 66-year-old man who admitted selling forgeries of paintings by British artist L.S. Lowry, the Malaga civil governor's office said. The office said John Green, 66, a native of Stroud, England, and a resident of this southern resort, told police he sold 50 forged Lowry works for prices of up to $2,608 each since 1976.
SPORTS
May 7, 2002 | Mal Florence
Englishman John Collinson, 36, made a modest living diving for lost balls in golf course ponds and selling them for 20 cents each ... and now he is in jail for trespassing. Police, ever vigilant, caught Collinson, equipped with a rubber diving suit at a course in England several months ago. He told a jury last week he had even filed taxes on his earnings, roughly $21,500 a year, but a judge jailed him anyway. "Rough justice," read an editorial in the Daily Telegraph.
SPORTS
June 16, 2011 | By Jeff Shain and Teddy Greenstein
Reporting from Bethesda, Md. — Robert Rock did not set foot at Congressional Country Club until Thursday. He didn't even get to the Washington area until 3:30 a.m. Thursday. Somehow, the English pro sleepwalked through a one-under-par 70 in his opening round. How does one explain that? "I don't know, really. I'm playing OK at the moment," said Rock, whose U.S. Open debut nearly got strangled in red tape as he awaited a visa. Approval didn't come until Wednesday afternoon, sending him scrambling to catch a U.S.-bound flight.
SPORTS
April 17, 2011 | By Jim Peltz
Few IndyCar drivers are more reserved and soft-spoken than Mike Conway, a 27-year-old Englishman who prefers to let his driving do the talking. And his skill spoke loud and clear Sunday as Conway, rebounding from serious injuries suffered in a horrific crash at last year's Indianapolis 500, won the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach — his first victory in the Izod IndyCar Series in 26 starts. "The car was just on fire, really, at the end," said Conway, who drives for Andretti Autosport, the team co-owned by former racer Michael Andretti.
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