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Engraving

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BUSINESS
February 7, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Want to engrave a few words in Chinese on your new iPad? No problem - Apple offers consumers in mainland China free personalization. Just don't get too political. Say you type in the Dalai Lama's name in Chinese characters into Apple's online store engraving service. You'll receive a yellow pop-up box saying, "The engraved text is not suitable. " Other phrases that return the same error notice include "Tibet independence," "Xinjiang independence" and "Taiwan independence.
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BUSINESS
February 7, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Want to engrave a few words in Chinese on your new iPad? No problem - Apple offers consumers in mainland China free personalization. Just don't get too political. Say you type in the Dalai Lama's name in Chinese characters into Apple's online store engraving service. You'll receive a yellow pop-up box saying, "The engraved text is not suitable. " Other phrases that return the same error notice include "Tibet independence," "Xinjiang independence" and "Taiwan independence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The booming illegal international wildlife trade forced conservationists to do the unthinkable Tuesday: Brand the golden domes of two of the rarest tortoises on Earth to reduce their black market value by making it easier for authorities to trace them if stolen. "It's heartbreaking that it's come to this, but it's the right thing to do," Paul Gibbons, managing director of the nonprofit Turtle Conservancy's Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, said as he gently placed a 30-pound adult female ploughshare tortoise on a small table.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The booming illegal international wildlife trade forced conservationists to do the unthinkable Tuesday: Brand the golden domes of two of the rarest tortoises on Earth to reduce their black market value by making it easier for authorities to trace them if stolen. "It's heartbreaking that it's come to this, but it's the right thing to do," Paul Gibbons, managing director of the nonprofit Turtle Conservancy's Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, said as he gently placed a 30-pound adult female ploughshare tortoise on a small table.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1986 | ALAN GOLDSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Key Image Systems disclosed Monday that Ehsan Manavi, chairman of the Chatsworth computer equipment company for just three months, resigned in December to pursue "personal business interests." Fara Mahdavi, the company's president since April, has taken on the title of chairman and assumed Manavi's duties. The management change comes at a time when the 12-year-old company is losing money and spending heavily on research and development.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1986 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"I never treat classification in art seriously: I hate it, and am happy we have a real victory over it," says painter Jan Sawka, describing his recent work, "A Book of Fiction" (Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.). "It is a book without words; it is a printed thing that is painted. You cannot call it an illustrated book, because it is not a book. It is dry-point engraving, and it is not--because it is tinted with gouache and water colors. It is published, but it is crazy."
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | DON ALPERT
Question: I have a United States Liberty silver-dollar proof coin and also a half-dollar proof coin, both in a gift box. I bought them from my bank. I'd like to know if they will ever be valuable. I paid $24 for the dollar and $7.50 for the half dollar.--C.G. Answer: Undoubtedly, you have the new Statue of Liberty coins. As I mentioned before, the Statue of Liberty sets with gold half eagles ($5 pieces) have made spectacular gains.
TRAVEL
January 1, 2012 | Jay Jones
With the holiday shopping season behind us -- and slim pickings in our wallets and checking accounts -- most of us lament the truth of one particular adage: Money doesn't grow on trees. Unless the prospect of a lengthy term in prison sounds attractive, we're probably not going to sneak off to the basement or the garage to print some extra green. As much as we might like it, that's a job we have to leave to the Money Factory. Year in and year out, there's never a shortage of moola here, where about 58% of America's money is made.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--One clothing chain in Florida really cashes in when it comes to wrapping gifts. For $55, Maus & Hoffman will gift-wrap items purchased in its four stores in a sheet of 32 uncut $1 bills. "A lot of people don't think it's real until they touch it," said Allen Wade, a sales manager at the chain's Bal Harbour store. The uncut sheets of bills are purchased from the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, said William H. Maus Jr., a vice president of the Fort Lauderdale-based chain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2001 | GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He works in a woolen vest, precisely knotted tie, pressed blue Oxford shirt and clutching a six-pound hammer. Nathen Blackwell, 79, is nothing if not fastidious, a fact that might be appreciated by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation Board of Trustees, whose names he is carving in the limestone walls of the Reagan Library.
SPORTS
September 30, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
The Stanley Cup made its first public appearance Saturday since the Kings' names were inscribed on it, and the updated trophy contained a surprise. The name of club co-owner Ed Roski, omitted from the original list submitted to the NHL and the Hockey Hall of Fame, is on the top line following the names of owner Phil Anschutz, Anschutz's wife, Nancy, and Tim Leiweke, head of the Kings' parent company. That gave the Kings 53 names on the Cup, one above the limit, but Roski's ownership role was considered important enough for the league to add his name.
SPORTS
September 29, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
The Hockey Hall of Fame and the Kings released the first photos of the Stanley Cup with the champions' names newly engraved on it, and among them was one surprise. Owner Ed Roski, whose name wasn't on the original list of 52 names the Kings had submitted for inclusion, appears on the top row, after owners Phil and Nancy Anschutz and AEG boss Tim Leiweke. That gave the team 53 names, one over the limit. However, adding Roski's name didn't require adding another line and the NHL gave permission for it to be engraved.
TRAVEL
January 1, 2012 | Jay Jones
With the holiday shopping season behind us -- and slim pickings in our wallets and checking accounts -- most of us lament the truth of one particular adage: Money doesn't grow on trees. Unless the prospect of a lengthy term in prison sounds attractive, we're probably not going to sneak off to the basement or the garage to print some extra green. As much as we might like it, that's a job we have to leave to the Money Factory. Year in and year out, there's never a shortage of moola here, where about 58% of America's money is made.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Albino Pineda can't forget his backbreaking youth as a migrant field laborer, the days when he came home so tired he could barely pull his heavy boots off. In Camarillo, he stooped over tomato plants for 10 hours, earning $14 a day. In Morro Bay, he sprayed the toxic chemical DDT on pea plants without protective gear. In San Jose, he filled heavy gunny sacks with apricots under a hot sun. Now, at age 86, the Santa Paula great-grandfather is living comfortably on a retired heavy equipment operator's pension.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2009 | Neely Tucker, Tucker writes for the Washington Post
For more than 150 years, Abraham Lincoln's pocket watch had been rumored to carry a secret message from the Civil War, supposedly written by an Irish immigrant and watchmaker named Jonathan Dillon. Dillon, working in a Maryland watch repair shop in 1861, told family members that he -- by incredible happenstance -- had been repairing Lincoln's watch when news came that Ft. Sumter had been attacked in South Carolina. It was the opening salvo of the Civil War.
SPORTS
March 6, 2009 | Mike Penner
Describing the New York Mets' new stadium as "the anti-Shea," the New York Times website offers a "first peek" photo montage inside and outside Citi Field. The ballpark, which will open March 29 with a game between Georgetown and St. John's, features a Jackie Robinson Rotunda outside its doors, the plaza built with engraved bricks purchased by fans for $195 to $340 for the privilege. One brick reads, "Jeri Hester was at Game 6. Nuff Said."
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | Associated Press
The number of U.S. postage stamp issues found to have secret markings was reported to have climbed to three as the Bureau of Engraving and Printing announced Tuesday that it is pursuing a detailed examination of all recent stamps. Linn's Stamp News reported that a Swedish government engraver worked his name into the grass depicted on a stamp designed to honor World War I veterans.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1985 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Three California cities--Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco--are among the leading candidates for a federal Bureau of Engraving and Printing satellite production facility that could eventually print about 25% of the nation's currency and employ about 200 workers. Officials learned in June that their cities were included in a bureau list of locations believed to meet minimum criteria, a California Department of Commerce spokesman said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga and Duke Helfand, LaGanga and Helfand are Times staff writers.
Oakland's new Cathedral of Christ the Light stretches skyward, sheathed in gleaming glass that reveals a delicate skeleton of wood and steel. Terrie Light has spent more than three years thinking about the elegant structure. She has attended more meetings than she can count about the $190-million cathedral complex while helping to design its most famous garden.
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