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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
As a student in the Los Angeles Unified School District, I have found that communication is often an insurmountable obstacle. District officials neglect the opinions of teachers and administrators, and the students suffer. There are not enough supplies, and there is no funding for field trips. However, the teachers still try their best to make do with what little they have, and most of them do a great job. Therefore, I was not surprised when the most senior staff began to depart from the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies one by one ("Parents Say Bureaucracy Is Luring Teachers Away," Oct. 27)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
Tucked in the corner of a grimy East Hollywood strip mall is a shining hope of public education. Or so U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Wednesday in an event that showcased a comprehensive program to boost academic achievement by supporting students and their families with job training, health services, after-school tutoring and other help. The program is a collaboration of Los Angeles public and private partners led by the Youth Policy Institute, which received a $30-million federal grant in 2012 to launch the initiative in the high-poverty neighborhoods of East Hollywood and Pacoima.
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WORLD
May 14, 2010 | By Julia Damianova and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Iran has expanded the number of machines producing medical reactor-grade uranium, an incremental step that could increase its ability to produce the highly refined material necessary to build a nuclear bomb, said two diplomats in Vienna, home of the U.N. atomic watchdog agency. The disclosure, first revealed by news agencies Friday, ups pressure on diplomats struggling to find a resolution of the confrontation between Tehran and the United States, Israel and their European allies over the nuclear program.
OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By Betty DeRamus
Black History Month reminds me of a really great golden oldies station, always blaring the same handful of terrific tunes. Every February, it plays Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman soul - with a chorus or two of the George Washington Carver blues. Now don't get me wrong. This is my kind of history, and my kind of heroes, and I understand why we must tell every generation their stories. I just think that including some fresh tales too would produce a far fuller picture of how blacks enriched America.
OPINION
July 12, 2003
Re "Artists Will Get By Without Grants," letter, July 6: Your letter writer's example of Vincent Van Gogh as a great artist who "never received a public grant from the French government, yet ... managed to leave the world an inspired body of work" may be true, but imagine if Van Gogh had received public grants for his innovative and inspiring works; perhaps he would not have lived a life of rejection and depression that ultimately led to his suicide....
OPINION
January 15, 2005 | By Peter Nicholas and Borzou Daragahi
Presenting a united front on Iran's nuclear energy program, President Obama and Russian counterpart Dmitry Medvedev warned Sunday that they were losing patience with Tehran and wouldn't wait much longer for it to accept a proposal to resolve the dispute. After an hourlong meeting in Singapore on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, the two leaders expressed dissatisfaction with Iran's response to a proposal to ship its enriched uranium abroad to be refined further for use in an Iranian reactor to produce medical isotopes.
WORLD
February 10, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
Iran's move on Tuesday to produce higher-grade uranium for a medical reactor prompted widespread international condemnation and an uncharacteristically harsh response from Russia, whose support is key to U.S.-led efforts to impose tough new sanctions against the Islamic Republic. But the response from China, which like Russia wields a U.N. Security Council veto and maintains robust economic ties with Iran, was far more muted, suggesting a tough road ahead for the Obama administration and Western allies seeking to put pressure on Tehran.
WORLD
November 9, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
A state-owned Iranian television station quoted unnamed diplomats today as saying Iran, in a possible compromise to a U.N.-backed proposal, is willing to send 800 kilograms, or 1,764 pounds, of its enriched uranium abroad to be exchanged for fuel for a medical reactor. The original proposal, backed by the Obama administration, had called for Iran to send abroad 1,200 kilograms, or 70% of its nuclear material supply, by year's end, temporarily lowering Iran's capacity to build a nuclear bomb and creating the diplomatic breathing room for a possible broader deal.
OPINION
February 8, 2005
Re "Actor Played a Powerful Role in Civil Rights Gains," obituary, Feb. 5: What more can one say about Ossie Davis than the world and our country in particular were vastly enriched by the way he chose to live his life. Dirk Blocker Santa Barbara
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1991
Linda Blandford's "Private Faces, Public Spaces" columns (Commentary) are outstanding! Her use of the language is marvelous--just the very right words to make me fully aware of her subject, and the life of that person. So much is packed into that small space. I always finish reading feeling so enriched--as if I'd been given a much desired gift. Thank you, Ms. Blandford. PAT CORPE West Covina
WORLD
December 7, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - President Obama signaled Saturday that he was prepared to allow Iran to enrich uranium on its own soil, saying that a final deal could be structured to prevent Tehran from developing a nuclear bomb. Obama also put the odds of success for the upcoming international negotiations with Iran at not "more than 50-50. " Seeking to rebut criticism of a just-completed interim nuclear deal with the Islamic Republic, Obama said in an appearance sponsored by the Brookings Institution's Saban Center for Middle East Policy that it was not realistic to try to force Iran to dismantle all of its multibillion-dollar nuclear complex.
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim
GENEVA - On the eve of a new round of talks, Iran's foreign minister appeared to suggest a way Tehran and the West can finesse the touchy question of whether the Islamic Republic will continue to enrich uranium for its nuclear program. Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif released a five-minute online video that describes the negotiations that begin Wednesday in Geneva as a "historic opportunity" and urges the West to participate with respect and equal treatment of Iran so that the talks will be successful.
WORLD
November 7, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Iran and six world powers appeared to close in on a preliminary agreement in Geneva on Thursday that would begin to limit Tehran's nuclear development after a decade of frustrating negotiations, according to diplomats. They said the proposed framework agreement, which could still falter, would require Iran to halt at least some enrichment activities in exchange for partial easing of economic sanctions. They described the expected accord as a significant first step intended to buy six months and perhaps longer to pursue a comprehensive final agreement.
WORLD
October 19, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - The six world powers negotiating with Iran over its disputed nuclear program asked Tehran in an opening proposal earlier this week to slow, rather than halt, low-level uranium enrichment at its two enrichment facilities, a hard-line website in Iran reported. The Mashregh website said the six countries proposed in a meeting in Geneva on Tuesday and Wednesday that Iran also slow the installation of gas centrifuges, the machines that produce enriched uranium, at the Natanz and Fordo nuclear facilities.
WORLD
October 15, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
GENEVA -- Iran's new proposal for ending the crisis over its nuclear program insists on the country's right to enrich uranium and demands removal of all sanctions on its economy, an Iranian news agency reported. The Iranian Student News Agency reported that the proposal, which was presented Tuesday morning at negotiations with six world powers in Geneva, says Iran will cooperate with the United Nations' nuclear watchdog agency, and on other “areas of concern.” But the proposal, as described by ISNA, doesn't include some details Western officials have hoped to see, such as an end to the creation of medium-enriched uranium, which can be easily converted into nuclear bomb fuel.
WORLD
October 14, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - After a decade of stalemate, diplomats from Iran, the U.S. and five other nations are about to meet for talks that will provide the clearest evidence yet of whether recent signs of a thaw in relations presage an agreement over Tehran's nuclear ambitions. Iran wants assurances at the talks Tuesday and Wednesday in Geneva that if it plunges into serious negotiations, it might win international approval to enrich uranium. Although uranium enriched at low levels is used to fuel civilian power plants, many nations fear that Iran, despite denials, wants to enrich it to high levels for use in bombs.
OPINION
July 23, 2008
Re "U-turn toward common sense," Opinion, July 19 In his article, Graham Allison implies that 500 pounds of low-enriched uranium that Iran has produced so far could easily be converted to highly enriched uranium for bombs. A couple of clarification points are missing from this article. First, Iranian-produced enrichment material remains under the control of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Second, converting this fuel to highly enriched uranium would take months. Any changes to the current facilities would be noticed by the IAEA instantly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1991
In view of the recent spate of racial hate crimes spawned by ignorance and bigotry in fair Orange County, it is surprising that the usual vocal flag-waving champions of more "teaching of patriotism" in our public schools aren't demanding that the "Patriotism Code" be altered to include: Requires teachers to stress the cultural and ethnic diversity of the immigrants to America--groups and individuals who have enriched and continue to enrich...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2013 | Sandy Banks
It started as a social club, a way for a bunch of Westside workaholics to carve out time for fun while doing a few good deeds on the side. As comfortable alums of prestigious schools, with satisfying careers, they wanted their friendship to become a lever of social change. "We were part of that generation in the '60s and '70s where social causes based on race and poverty came to the forefront," recalled investment banker Rob Deutschman. "We were all exposed to the civil rights movement, to Vietnam, to the campaigns against poverty in urban America.
OPINION
August 1, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
SeaWorld would no doubt prefer that the public forget about Dawn Brancheau, the trainer who died in an attack by a killer whale at its Orlando theme park more than three years ago. But that's unlikely to happen in the near future - not after the recent release of the documentary "Blackfish," which explores why Tilikum, a whale involved in two previous deaths, attacked Brancheau during a performance. Conclusions are hard to draw, but if nothing else, the public is learning to ask harder questions about whether it is humane or right to keep these intelligent, social marine mammals in aquarium tanks, performing for crowds.
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