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Enrico Fermi

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NEWS
January 8, 1995 | JOHN BARBOUR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
She no longer had to wonder. Two atomic bombs obliterated Hiroshima and Nagasaki and ended World War II. Her father and his fellow scientists had introduced the human race to a weapon capable of wiping out hundreds of thousands of lives in moments. It was a weapon that would hold the world in thrall forever.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Maurice Goldhaber, one of the pioneers of modern physics whose experiments helped create the current understanding of how the world works, died May 11 at his home on Long Island, N.Y., after a short illness. He had celebrated his 100th birthday less than a month earlier. Goldhaber was "one of the world's most distinguished nuclear and particle physicists," the U.S. government said in 1998 when it presented him the prestigious Enrico Fermi Award. His innovative and thought-provoking experiments provided much of the foundation for the standard model of physics that now paints our view of the universe, and his leadership and vision as head of the Brookhaven National Laboratory during the 1960s led to three Nobel Prizes in Physics for the Long Island institution.
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NEWS
April 19, 1985
U.S. military experts considered poisoning 500,000 Germans during World War II with radioactive food, according to a letter from A-bomb father J. Robert Oppenheimer to physicist Enrico Fermi. Oppenheimer wrote Fermi in 1943 about the plan, recommending that Fermi delay work on it until some technical problems could be solved. There is no evidence the plan was attempted. Barton J.
BOOKS
November 26, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
PICTURING THE BOMB: Photographs From the Secret World of the Manhattan Project, by Rachel Fermi and Esther Samra (Harry N. Abrams: $39.95; 232 pp.). Because we know the way the story turned out, these photographs, almost all taken before the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, have a markedly ominous air about them. Sometimes the most innocent pictures, like bingo night at Hanford, Wash., or a Girl Scout troop outside Oak Ridge, Tenn.
BOOKS
November 26, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
PICTURING THE BOMB: Photographs From the Secret World of the Manhattan Project, by Rachel Fermi and Esther Samra (Harry N. Abrams: $39.95; 232 pp.). Because we know the way the story turned out, these photographs, almost all taken before the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, have a markedly ominous air about them. Sometimes the most innocent pictures, like bingo night at Hanford, Wash., or a Girl Scout troop outside Oak Ridge, Tenn.
BOOKS
August 10, 1986 | Peter Goodchild, Goodchild has been head of the BBC's science department and was the producer of a television series and author of a biography on Robert Oppenheimer. and
In the summer of 1939, the German nuclear physicist, Werner Heisenberg, came to the United States on a lecture tour, and, while in New York, met his famous Italian colleague, Enrico Fermi, who had recently emigrated from his home country. According to Malcolm MacPherson, Fermi directly challenged Heisenberg about his intended return to work in Germany, pointing out that atomic physicists would be expected by their respective governments to work on new weapons. Heisenberg's response was confused.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | LEE DYE
In the scores of television documentaries and newspaper and magazine articles flowing out of the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, there has been enough Monday morning quarterbacking to make any coach ill. Some of it is enlightening, and there cannot be too much discussion of an event that altered human history in such a tragic way. But some of it is a little weird.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Maurice Goldhaber, one of the pioneers of modern physics whose experiments helped create the current understanding of how the world works, died May 11 at his home on Long Island, N.Y., after a short illness. He had celebrated his 100th birthday less than a month earlier. Goldhaber was "one of the world's most distinguished nuclear and particle physicists," the U.S. government said in 1998 when it presented him the prestigious Enrico Fermi Award. His innovative and thought-provoking experiments provided much of the foundation for the standard model of physics that now paints our view of the universe, and his leadership and vision as head of the Brookhaven National Laboratory during the 1960s led to three Nobel Prizes in Physics for the Long Island institution.
BOOKS
May 21, 1989 | Richard Eder
"A portrait in voices of (a) nuclear and lopsided family. The nucleus is unstable and radioactive. The voices are clicks on a Geiger counter. . . . Joan Chase is the Enrico Fermi of domestic subatomics; that is, of the woman's part."
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | LEE DYE
In the scores of television documentaries and newspaper and magazine articles flowing out of the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, there has been enough Monday morning quarterbacking to make any coach ill. Some of it is enlightening, and there cannot be too much discussion of an event that altered human history in such a tragic way. But some of it is a little weird.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | JOHN BARBOUR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
She no longer had to wonder. Two atomic bombs obliterated Hiroshima and Nagasaki and ended World War II. Her father and his fellow scientists had introduced the human race to a weapon capable of wiping out hundreds of thousands of lives in moments. It was a weapon that would hold the world in thrall forever.
BOOKS
August 10, 1986 | Peter Goodchild, Goodchild has been head of the BBC's science department and was the producer of a television series and author of a biography on Robert Oppenheimer. and
In the summer of 1939, the German nuclear physicist, Werner Heisenberg, came to the United States on a lecture tour, and, while in New York, met his famous Italian colleague, Enrico Fermi, who had recently emigrated from his home country. According to Malcolm MacPherson, Fermi directly challenged Heisenberg about his intended return to work in Germany, pointing out that atomic physicists would be expected by their respective governments to work on new weapons. Heisenberg's response was confused.
NEWS
April 19, 1985
U.S. military experts considered poisoning 500,000 Germans during World War II with radioactive food, according to a letter from A-bomb father J. Robert Oppenheimer to physicist Enrico Fermi. Oppenheimer wrote Fermi in 1943 about the plan, recommending that Fermi delay work on it until some technical problems could be solved. There is no evidence the plan was attempted. Barton J.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | United Press International
Luis W. Alvarez, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and University of California, today was named by the Department of Energy as the winner of the 1987 Enrico Fermi Award. The award, which includes a gold medal and $100,000, carried the citation "for the importance and breadth of his pioneering contributions in the physical sciences."
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Luis W. Alvarez, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and University of California, and Gerald F. Tape were named Monday by the Department of Energy as winners of the 1987 Enrico Fermi Award. Each recipient will receive a gold medal and $100,000. Tape, of Bethesda, Md., was honored for "contributions to the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons," among other work.
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