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Enrique Krauze

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2004
I must take exception to the theme of Enrique Krauze's conclusions in his article on "21 Grams" ("Hollywood Deaths: An American Dream," Feb. 22). Mr. Krauze would like to believe that it was some flaw in American culture that accounted for the lack of enthusiasm from audiences about "21 Grams." For me, the flaws were not the fault of the audience but could be laid solely at the foot of the director. Despite a good script and many superb performances, the result seemed like a great film that had suffered a sad accident in the cutting room.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
The great Mexican writer José Emilio Pacheco died on Sunday of a heart attack at the age of 74. This week he was remembered in his native Mexico City with funeral services worthy of a head of state. Pacheco, born in 1939, burst on to the Mexican literary scene in the 1960s and '70s with several poetry and short-story collections. His 1981 novella “Las batallas en el desierto” ("The Battles in the Desert"), based largely on his own middle-class Mexico City upbringing, was a love poem to a smaller, more innocent metropolis that was later wiped out by explosive growth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
The great Mexican writer José Emilio Pacheco died on Sunday of a heart attack at the age of 74. This week he was remembered in his native Mexico City with funeral services worthy of a head of state. Pacheco, born in 1939, burst on to the Mexican literary scene in the 1960s and '70s with several poetry and short-story collections. His 1981 novella “Las batallas en el desierto” ("The Battles in the Desert"), based largely on his own middle-class Mexico City upbringing, was a love poem to a smaller, more innocent metropolis that was later wiped out by explosive growth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2004
I must take exception to the theme of Enrique Krauze's conclusions in his article on "21 Grams" ("Hollywood Deaths: An American Dream," Feb. 22). Mr. Krauze would like to believe that it was some flaw in American culture that accounted for the lack of enthusiasm from audiences about "21 Grams." For me, the flaws were not the fault of the audience but could be laid solely at the foot of the director. Despite a good script and many superb performances, the result seemed like a great film that had suffered a sad accident in the cutting room.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Like other wars, this one was started in the United States and spread to Nicaragua. The combat has escalated amid cries of an inquisition and charges of foreign intervention. But this war is being fought on a battlefield of newsprint and political reviews.
BOOKS
July 6, 1997 | SAUL LANDAU, Saul Landau is a documentary filmmaker whose latest work, "The Sixth Sun: Mayan Uprising in Chiapas," is being aired on PBS. He is also a fellow of the Institute of Policy Studies in Washington, D.C., and of the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam
Today, July 6, tens of millions of Mexicans will vote in congressional and local elections. Because the elections will be more widely observed than ever by Mexico's neighbors and trading partners, the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, in power for nearly three quarters of a century, cannot so easily resort to its traditional electoral chicanery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Antonio Ortiz Mena, 99, former Mexican treasury secretary under two presidents and a recognized financial wizard who oversaw a period of stable economic growth and industrialization, died Monday at a hospital in Mexico City, Mexican news media reported. Ortiz Mena served under Presidents Adolfo Lopez Mateos from 1958 to '64 and Gustavo Diaz Ordaz from 1964 to '70.
WORLD
June 12, 2012 | By Ken Ellingwood and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - When Mexico's long-ruling party was ousted by voters 12 years ago, giddy celebrants hailed the event as something like the fall of the Berlin Wall. For seven decades, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, had governed virtually unchallenged, aided by election trickery, a well-honed ability to buy off potential troublemakers and, when that didn't work, an iron fist. Its historic loss in 2000, and its tumble to third place six years later, led some to even imagine a Mexico without the PRI. Now the PRI is on the verge of an epic comeback.
BOOKS
April 11, 2004 | Hugh Thomas, Hugh Thomas is the author of numerous books, including "Conquest: Montezuma, Cortes, and the Fall of Old Mexico" and the forthcoming "Rivers of Gold: The Rise of the Spanish Empire, from Columbus to Magellan."
I began to know something of Mexico in the late 1980s when Murray Rossant, then director of the Twentieth Century Fund (now known as the Century Foundation), asked me to write a study of what I thought should be the United States' policy with Mexico. I traveled all over that country for the first time and wrote a report of which I was inordinately proud. My key suggestion was that American cities should adopt and cultivate a Mexican town of comparable size to their own.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party won two Mexican governorships this weekend but lost a third state race as opposition parties made inroads into the PRI's traditional victory margins, according to nearly complete official election results released Monday. In the small central state of Aguascalientes, the opposition National Action Party, or PAN, defeated the PRI to take the governor's seat for the first time.
BOOKS
July 6, 1997 | SAUL LANDAU, Saul Landau is a documentary filmmaker whose latest work, "The Sixth Sun: Mayan Uprising in Chiapas," is being aired on PBS. He is also a fellow of the Institute of Policy Studies in Washington, D.C., and of the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam
Today, July 6, tens of millions of Mexicans will vote in congressional and local elections. Because the elections will be more widely observed than ever by Mexico's neighbors and trading partners, the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, in power for nearly three quarters of a century, cannot so easily resort to its traditional electoral chicanery.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Like other wars, this one was started in the United States and spread to Nicaragua. The combat has escalated amid cries of an inquisition and charges of foreign intervention. But this war is being fought on a battlefield of newsprint and political reviews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1988 | MARK EDWARD MORAN, Mark Edward Moran is a Washington lawyer who represents the office of the president of Mexico in the United States. He is a former adviser to the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
Carlos Salinas de Gortari has been confirmed as Mexico's next president, and, as the dust raised by the closely contested election begins to settle, some explaining is in order. Even as the voting ended July 6, some American news media rushed to the conclusion that it was marred by "massive fraud" and represented the last political gasp of Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which has ruled the country continually for almost 60 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a political scientist and longtime critic of the PRI and the Salinas government. He hosted the first meetings of Grupo San Angel.
It might appear surprising, or even outrageous, to state that Mexico's upcoming presidential election, being touted as the most crucial, contested and clean vote in the country's history, is not really very important.
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